Governor of Colorado

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Governor of the State of Colorado)
Jump to: navigation, search
Governor of the State of Colorado
Seal of the Executive Office of Colorado.svg
=
Incumbent
John Hickenlooper

since January 11, 2011
Style The Honorable
Residence Colorado Governor's Mansion
Term length Four years, can succeed self once
Inaugural holder John Long Routt
Formation August 1, 1876
Deputy Joseph A. Garcia
Salary $90,000 (2009)[1]
Website www.colorado.gov/governor

The Governor of the State of Colorado is the head of the executive branch of U.S State of Colorado's government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws, and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Colorado General Assembly, to convene the legislature, and to grant pardons, except in cases of treason or impeachment.[2]

Seven people served as governor of Colorado Territory over eight terms, appointed by the President of the United States. Since statehood, there have been 36 governors, serving 41 distinct terms. The longest-serving governors were Richard "Dick" Lamm and Roy Romer, who each served twelve years over three terms. The shortest term occurred on March 17, 1905, a day when the state had three governors: Alva Adams won the election, but soon after he took office, the legislature declared his opponent, James Peabody, governor, but on the condition that he immediately resign, so that his lieutenant governor, Jesse McDonald, could be governor. Thus, Peabody served only a few minutes as governor.

The current governor is John Hickenlooper, who took office on January 11, 2011.

Governors[edit]

Governor of the Territory of Jefferson[edit]

The self-proclaimed Provisional Government of the Territory of Jefferson was organized on November 7, 1859.[3] Jefferson Territory included all of present-day Colorado, but extended about 3 miles (5 km) farther east, 138 miles (222 km) farther north, and about 50 miles (80 km) farther west.[4] The territory was never recognized by the federal government in the tumultuous days before the American Civil War. The Jefferson Territory had only one governor, Robert Williamson Steele, a pro-union Democrat elected by popular vote. He proclaimed the territory dissolved on June 6, 1861, several months after the official formation of the Colorado Territory, but only days after the arrival of its first governor.[5]

Governors of the Territory of Colorado[edit]

William Gilpin, first Governor of the Territory of Colorado
For the period before Colorado Territory was formed, see the lists of Governors of New Mexico Territory, Utah Territory, Kansas Territory, and Nebraska Territory.

The Territory of Colorado was organized on February 28, 1861, from parts of the territories of New Mexico, Utah, and Nebraska, and the unorganized territory that was previously the western portion of Kansas Territory.[6]

# Governor Took office Left office Appointed by Notes
1   Gilpin, WilliamWilliam Gilpin March 25, 1861[7] March 26, 1862 Lincoln, AbrahamAbraham Lincoln [a][b]
2   Evans, JohnJohn Evans March 26, 1862[7] October 17, 1865 Lincoln, AbrahamAbraham Lincoln [c]
3   Cummings, AlexanderAlexander Cummings October 17, 1865[11] April 24, 1867 Johnson, AndrewAndrew Johnson
4   Hunt, Alexander CameronAlexander Cameron Hunt April 24, 1867[11] June 14, 1869 Johnson, AndrewAndrew Johnson
5   McCook, Edward M.Edward M. McCook June 14, 1869[12] 1873 Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant [d]
6   Elbert, Samuel HittSamuel Hitt Elbert April 4, 1873[13] 1874 Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant [e]
7   McCook, Edward M.Edward M. McCook June 19, 1874[12] March 29, 1875 Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant
8   Routt, John LongJohn Long Routt March 29, 1875[14] August 1, 1876 Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant

Governors of the State of Colorado[edit]

Davis Hanson Waite, Eighth Governor of the State of Colorado
Charles Spalding Thomas, 11th Governor of the State of Colorado
George Alfred Carlson, 20th Governor of the State of Colorado
Ralph Lawrence Carr, 29th Governor of the State of Colorado
Richard "Dick" Lamm, 38th Governor of the State of Colorado

The State of Colorado was admitted to the Union on August 1, 1876.

To serve as Governor, one must be at least 30 years old, be a citizen of the United States, and have been a resident of the state for at least two years prior to election. The state constitution of 1876 originally called for election of the governor every two years, with their term beginning on the second Tuesday of the January following the election.[15] An amendment passed in 1956, taking effect in 1959, increased terms to four years.[16] Originally, there was no term limit applied to the governor; a 1990 amendment allowed governors to succeed themselves only once.[17] There is however no limit on the total number of terms one may serve as long as one who has served the two term limit is out of office for four years.

Should the office of governor become vacant, the lieutenant governor becomes governor.[18] If both the offices governor and lieutenant governor are vacant, the line of succession moves down through the senior members of the state senate and state house of representatives of the same party as the governor.[19] The lieutenant governor was elected separately from the governor until a 1968 amendment to the constitution[20] made it so that they are elected on the same ticket.[21]

      Republican (19)[f]       Democratic (22)[g]       People's (1)

#[h] Governor Term start Term end Party Lt. Governor[i] Terms[j]
1   John Long Routt August 1, 1876 January 14, 1879 Republican   Lafayette Head 1
2 Frederick Walker Pitkin January 14, 1879 January 9, 1883 Republican Horace Austin Warner Tabor 2
3 James Benton Grant January 9, 1883 January 13, 1885 Democratic William H. Meyer[k] 1
4 Benjamin Harrison Eaton January 13, 1885 January 11, 1887 Republican Peter W. Breene 1
5 Alva Adams January 11, 1887 January 8, 1889 Democratic Norman H. Meldrum 1
6 Job Adams Cooper January 8, 1889 January 13, 1891 Republican William Grover Smith 1
7 John Long Routt January 13, 1891 January 10, 1893 Republican William Story 1
8 Davis Hanson Waite January 10, 1893 January 8, 1895 People's David Hopkinson Nichols 1
9 Albert Washington McIntire January 8, 1895 January 12, 1897 Republican Jared L. Brush 1
10 Alva Adams January 12, 1897 January 10, 1899 Democratic Jared L. Brush[k] 1
11 Charles Spalding Thomas January 10, 1899 January 8, 1901 Democratic Francis Patrick Carney[l] 1
12 James Bradley Orman January 8, 1901 January 13, 1903 Democratic David C. Coates[m] 1
13 James Hamilton Peabody January 13, 1903 January 10, 1905 Republican Warren A. Haggott[n] 1
14 Alva Adams January 10, 1905 March 17, 1905 Democratic Arthur Cornforth 13[o]
15 James Hamilton Peabody March 17, 1905 March 17, 1905 Republican Jesse Fuller McDonald 13[o]
16 Jesse Fuller McDonald March 17, 1905 January 8, 1907 Republican Fred W. Parks 13[o]
17 Henry Augustus Buchtel January 8, 1907 January 12, 1909 Republican Erastus Harper 1
18 John F. Shafroth January 12, 1909 January 14, 1913 Democratic Stephen R. Fitzgarrald 2
19 Elias M. Ammons January 14, 1913 January 12, 1915 Democratic Stephen R. Fitzgarrald 1
20 George Alfred Carlson January 12, 1915 January 9, 1917 Republican Moses E. Lewis 1
21 Julius Caldeen Gunter January 9, 1917 January 14, 1919 Democratic James A. Pulliam 1
22 Oliver Henry Shoup January 14, 1919 January 9, 1923 Republican George Stepham 2
Earl Cooley
23 William Ellery Sweet January 9, 1923 January 13, 1925 Democratic Robert F. Rockwell[k] 1
24 Clarence Morley January 13, 1925 January 11, 1927 Republican Sterling Byrd Lacy[p] 1
25 Billy Adams January 11, 1927 January 10, 1933 Democratic George Milton Corlett[k] 3
Edwin C. Johnson
26 Edwin C. Johnson January 10, 1933 January 1, 1937 Democratic Ray Herbert Talbot 1 12[q]
27 Ray Herbert Talbot January 1, 1937 January 12, 1937 Democratic vacant 12[r]
28 Teller Ammons January 12, 1937 January 10, 1939 Democratic Frank J. Hayes 1
29 Ralph Lawrence Carr January 10, 1939 January 12, 1943 Republican John Charles Vivian 2
30 John Charles Vivian January 12, 1943 January 14, 1947 Republican William Eugene Higby 2
31 William Lee Knous January 14, 1947 April 15, 1950 Democratic Homer L. Pearson 1 12[s]
Walter Walford Johnson
32 Walter Walford Johnson April 15, 1950 January 9, 1951 Democratic Charles P. Murphy[k] 12[r]
33 Daniel I.J. Thornton January 9, 1951 January 11, 1955 Republican Gordon L. Allott 2
34 Edwin C. Johnson January 11, 1955 January 8, 1957 Democratic Stephen L.R. McNichols 1
35 Stephen L.R. McNichols January 8, 1957 January 8, 1963 Democratic Frank L. Hays[k] 2[t]
Robert Lee Knous
36 John Arthur Love January 8, 1963 July 16, 1973 Republican Robert Lee Knous[p] 2 12[u]
Mark Anthony Hogan[p]
John David Vanderhoof
37 John David Vanderhoof July 16, 1973 January 14, 1975 Republican Ted L. Strickland 12[r]
38 Richard "Dick" Lamm January 14, 1975 January 13, 1987 Democratic George L. Brown 3
Nancy E. Dick
39 Roy Romer January 13, 1987 January 12, 1999 Democratic Mike Callihan 3
Samuel H. Cassidy
Gail Schoettler
40 Bill Owens January 12, 1999 January 9, 2007 Republican Joe Rogers 2
Jane E. Norton
41 Bill Ritter January 9, 2007 January 11, 2011 Democratic Barbara O'Brien 1
42 John Hickenlooper January 11, 2011 Incumbent Democratic Joseph A. Garcia 1[v]

Other high offices held[edit]

Three of Colorado's governors have served other high offices, all three representing Colorado in the U.S. Senate and one of those also representing the state in the U.S. House. One (marked with *) resigned to take his seat in the Senate.

Governor Gubernatorial term Other offices held Source
Thomas, Charles SpaldingCharles Spalding Thomas 1899–1901 Senator [26]
Shafroth, John FranklinJohn Franklin Shafroth 1909–1913 Representative, Senator [27]
Johnson, Edwin CarlEdwin Carl Johnson 1933–1937, 1955–1957 Senator* [28]

Living former governors[edit]

As of September 2014, four former governors were alive, the oldest being Roy Romer (1987–1999, born 1928). The most recent death of a former governor, and also the most recently serving governor to have died, was that of John David Vanderhoof (1973–1975), who died on September 19, 2013.

Governor Term of office Date of birth
Richard "Dick" Lamm 1975–1987 (1935-09-12) September 12, 1935 (age 79)
Roy Romer 1987–1999 (1928-10-31) October 31, 1928 (age 85)
Bill Owens 1999–2007 (1950-10-22) October 22, 1950 (age 63)
Bill Ritter 2007–2011 (1956-09-06) September 6, 1956 (age 58)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The territory was formed on February 28, 1861, but no governor was appointed until March 25, 1861. Gilpin himself did not arrive in the territory until May 27, 1861.[8]
  2. ^ Removed from office for improper financial drafts from the federal treasury.[9]
  3. ^ Resigned at the request of President Johnson following the Sand Creek Massacre. The resignation was requested on July 18, 1865.[10]
  4. ^ Removed from office by petition.[12]
  5. ^ Records show Elbert served "less than a year", but his successor was appointed on June 19, 1874, which was 14 months after Elbert took office.[13]
  6. ^ Includes two terms served by repeat governors.
  7. ^ Includes three terms served by repeat governors.
  8. ^ The official numbering includes repeat governors.
  9. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  10. ^ The fractional terms of some governors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple governors served, due to resignations, deaths and the like.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Represented the Republican Party.
  12. ^ Represented the Populist Party.
  13. ^ The Colorado State Archives labels Coates a Democrat;[22] however, a contemporary New York Times article describes him as a Populist elected on a fusion ticket, and that he had renounced all other parties and become a Socialist.[23]
  14. ^ The Colorado State Archives says Haggott served from 1902 to 1903; however, multiple sources say he served with Peabody[24] well into 1904,[25] so it is assumed the Archives are in error.
  15. ^ a b c The 1904 election was rife with fraud and controversy. Alva Adams won election, but soon after he took office the Republican legislature declared James Peabody to be the actual winner, on the condition that Peabody immediately resign. Since Peabody had been governor for a few moments before resigning, it was his lieutenant governor, Jesse McDonald, that succeeded to the governorship. In all, Colorado had three governors on March 17, 1905.
  16. ^ a b c Represented the Democratic Party.
  17. ^ Resigned to take elected seat in the United States Senate.
  18. ^ a b c As lieutenant governor, filled unexpired term.
  19. ^ Resigned to take seat on the United States District Court for the District of Colorado.
  20. ^ Gubernatorial terms changed from two to four years during McNichols' term; his first term was two years, his second term was four years.
  21. ^ Resigned to be Director of the Office of Energy Policy.
  22. ^ Governor Hickenlooper's first term expires on January 13, 2015; he is not yet term limited.

References[edit]

General
Constitutions
Specific
  1. ^ "Salaries of elected state officials". Colorado Revised Statutes. Michie's Legal Resources. Retrieved June 3, 2010. 
  2. ^ CO Const. art IV
  3. ^ University of Colorado Studies, p. 71
  4. ^ University of Colorado Studies, p. 68
  5. ^ University of Colorado Studies, pp. 75–76
  6. ^ Thirty-sixth United States Congress (February 28, 1861). "An Act to provide a temporary Government for the Territory of Colorado" (PDF). State of Colorado, Department of Personnel and Administration, Colorado State Archives. Retrieved November 29, 2007. 
  7. ^ a b Houston Jr., Robert B. (2005). Two Colorado Odysseys: Chief Ouray Porter Nelson. p. 3. ISBN 0-595-35860-8. 
  8. ^ McGinnis, Ralph Y.; Calvin N. Smith (1994). Abraham Lincoln and the Western Territories. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 58. ISBN 0-8304-1247-6. 
  9. ^ "William Gilpin". Colorado Governor's Index. Colorado State Archives. Retrieved October 23, 2008. 
  10. ^ "Correspondence from W. H. Seward to Gov. John Evans, re: Request by President for Resignation – 7/18/1865". Colorado State Archives. Retrieved September 1, 2007. 
  11. ^ a b "Alexander Cummings". Colorado Governor's Index. Colorado State Archives. Retrieved September 1, 2007. 
  12. ^ a b c "Edward Moody McCook". Colorado Governor's Index. Colorado State Archives. Retrieved September 1, 2007. 
  13. ^ a b "Samuel Hitt Elbert". Colorado Governor's Index. Colorado State Archives. Retrieved September 1, 2007. 
  14. ^ "John L. Routt". Colorado Governor's Index. Colorado State Archives. Retrieved September 1, 2007. 
  15. ^ CO Const. art IV, original section 1
  16. ^ "Ballot History". Colorado Legislature. Retrieved December 4, 2008. 
  17. ^ "Ballot History". Colorado Legislature. Retrieved December 4, 2008. 
  18. ^ CO Const. art IV, sec 13
  19. ^ CO Const. art IV, sec 13, paragraph 7
  20. ^ "Ballot History". Colorado Legislature. Retrieved December 4, 2008. 
  21. ^ CO Const. art IV, sec 1
  22. ^ "Lieutenant Governors of Colorado". Colorado State Archives. Retrieved October 25, 2009. 
  23. ^ "General Notes". The New York Times. July 13, 1902. Retrieved October 25, 2009. 
  24. ^ Goodspeed, Weston Arthur (1904). The Province and the States: Missouri, Kansas, Colorado. p. 481. Retrieved October 25, 2009. 
  25. ^ "Shots Fired from Windows". The New York Times. June 6, 1904. Retrieved October 25, 2009. 
  26. ^ "Thomas, Charles Spalding". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved October 22, 2008. 
  27. ^ "Shafroth, John Franklin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved October 22, 2008. 
  28. ^ "Johnson, Edwin Carl". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved October 22, 2008. 

External links[edit]