Grade II listed buildings in Liverpool-L1

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Listed Buildings in Liverpool
Lime Street railway station
Lime Street railway station, which opened in 1836, is the primary terminus for mainline services in Liverpool
Listed buildings in Liverpool
Grade I listed buildings
Grade II* listed buildings
Grade II listed buildings:

Liverpool is a city and port in Merseyside, England, which contains many listed buildings. A listed building is a structure designated by English Heritage of being of architectural and/or of historical importance and, as such, is included in the National Heritage List for England. There are three grades of listing, according to the degree of importance of the structure. Grade I includes those buildings that are of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; the buildings in Grade II* are "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and those in Grade II are "nationally important and of special interest". Very few buildings are included in Grade I — only 2.5% of the total. Grade II* buildings represent 5.5% of the total, while the great majority, 92%, are included in Grade II.[1]

Liverpool contains more than 1,550 listed buildings, of which 28 are in Grade I, 109 in Grade II*, and the rest in Grade II.[a] This list contains the Grade II listed buildings in the L1 postal district of Liverpool. This area of the city formed part of the commercial hub of the city during the 19th and early 20th centuries. From that time, and continuing into the present, it also contains the major shopping district of the city. During the late 18th century, residential streets were developed in the area, the most important of these being Rodney Street, Duke Street, Seel Street and Bold Street. Some of the buildings in these streets continue to be used for domestic use, others have been adapted for different purposes, including retail and professional.[2][3]

Grade II listed buildings from other areas in the city can be found through the template on the right, along with the lists of the Grade I and Grade II* buildings in the city.

Buildings[edit]

Name Location Built Notes
15 Argyle Street
53°24′07″N 2°59′06″W / 53.4020°N 2.9849°W / 53.4020; -2.9849 (15 Argyle Street)
Mid-19th century Originally a warehouse, the building is in brick with a slate roof. It has a rectangular plan, with six storeys and a basement. It has been converted into flats.[4][5]
Old Bridewell 17 Argyle Street
53°24′09″N 2°59′03″W / 53.4025°N 2.9842°W / 53.4025; -2.9842 (17 Argyle Street)
1861 This was originally a bridewell and police station. It is built in brick with stone dressings and has a slate roof. The building is in two storeys, has three bays, and is in Italianate style. It is asymmetrical and has two towers of different heights. It has since been used as a restaurant. The boundary walls are included in the listing.[4][6]
23 Argyle Street
53°24′06″N 2°59′03″W / 53.4016°N 2.9842°W / 53.4016; -2.9842 (23 Argyle Street)
Mid to late 19th century A warehouse with five storeys and a cellar. It is in brick, with a plastered ground floor, and a slate roof. The building is in three bays, has windows with segmental arches and, in the top floor, oval windows. It has a wooden catshead.[7][8]
Heap's Rice Mill Bethwick Street
53°23′59″N 2°59′09″W / 53.3998°N 2.9857°W / 53.3998; -2.9857 (Heap's Rice Mill)
Early to mid 19th century Originating as a rice mill, with warehouses added and later combined into a single building. It is constructed in brick with some sandstone dressings, and has roofs of slate, tiles and corrugated sheeting and a frame of timber and cast iron. The whole building has a square plan, and is mainly in seven storeys.[9][10]
8 and 10 Benson Street
53°24′13″N 2°58′31″W / 53.4037°N 2.9753°W / 53.4037; -2.9753 (8 and 10 Benson Street)
1844–48 Originally a house with an attached warehouse, built in ashlar sandstone and brick, with a slate roof. It was built for Samuel and James Holme, contractors, its design being attributed to Arthur Hill Holme. It is in Greek Revival style, and has a pediment with acanthus scrolls. The building was converted for residential use in 2003.[11][12]
12 Benson Street
53°24′13″N 2°58′34″W / 53.4037°N 2.9760°W / 53.4037; -2.9760 (12 Benson Street)
1818 A brick house with stone dressings. It has three storeys, an attic and a basement, and is in two bays. All the windows have wedge lintels; most are sashes and one is a casement window.[13]
24–30 Berry Street
87 Seel Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′34″W / 53.4011°N 2.9762°W / 53.4011; -2.9762 (24–30 Berry Street)
1798-1803 Three shops in stuccoed brick with sandstone dressings and a hipped slate roof. They were originally part of Walmsley's Yard. The building has an L-shaped plan in three storeys, with five bays facing Berry Street, and three bays facing Seel Street.[14][15]
Blackburne Terrace 1–6 Blackburne Place
53°23′57″N 2°58′10″W / 53.3993°N 2.9695°W / 53.3993; -2.9695 (Blackburne Terrace)
1826 A terrace of six houses in brick on a stone base, with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys, and each house has three bays. The sash windows have wedge lintels, and four houses have porches with Doric fluted columns and entablatures. The entrances of the others have architraves and pilasters with capitals decorated with acanthus and lotus features.[16][17]
3 Blackburne Place
53°23′59″N 2°58′12″W / 53.3997°N 2.9701°W / 53.3997; -2.9701 (3 Blackburne Place)
1820s A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and a basement, and is in two bays. The windows are sashes with have wedge lintels.[18]
5 and 7 Blackburne Place
53°23′59″N 2°58′12″W / 53.3997°N 2.9700°W / 53.3997; -2.9700 (5 and 7 Blackburne Place)
1820s Two houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys and a basement, and have two bays to each house. The windows are sashes with have wedge lintels. The entrances have flat architraves and cornices.[19]
Blackburne House Blackburne Place
53°24′00″N 2°58′14″W / 53.3999°N 2.9705°W / 53.3999; -2.9705 (Blackburne House)
1788 Initially built as a house, later converted into a school, and known for a time as the Liverpool Institute High School for Girls. It was extended in 1874–76 by W. I. Mason, by the addition of a north wing and a tower. It is built in brick with stone dressings, and has a slate roof. There are two storeys, a basement and an attic, and the front is in seven bays.[20][21][22]
6–15 Bold Place
26 Roscoe Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′29″W / 53.4013°N 2.9748°W / 53.4013; -2.9748 (6–15 Bold Place)
Early 19th century A row of ten houses in brick with stone dressings. They are in three storeys with a basement, and there are two bays to each house. The windows are a mix of sashes and casements. The doorways have Tuscan pilasters.[23]
10 Bold Street
53°24′15″N 2°58′52″W / 53.4043°N 2.9812°W / 53.4043; -2.9812 (10 Bold Street)
Early 19th century Originally a private house, later converted into a shop. It is in brick, the upper two floors being stuccoed. It has four storeys, and is in two bays.[24]
12–16 Bold Street
53°24′15″N 2°58′52″W / 53.4043°N 2.9811°W / 53.4043; -2.9811 (12–16 Bold Street)
1848 The building was extended later. It is an iron-framed shop, with plate glass windows rising through two floors, between which are slim iron struts. No. 12 has three storeys, and Nos. 14 and 16 have four. No. 12 has a plain parapet at the top, and Nos. 14 and 16 have a cornice.[25][26]
43–47 Bold Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′43″W / 53.4033°N 2.9785°W / 53.4033; -2.9785 (43–47 Bold Street)
1861 This was originally the head office of the Liverpool Savings Bank, and later used as a shop. It was designed by William Culshaw in the style of a palazzo. It is constructed in stone with four storeys, and has five bays.[27][28]
Marlborough House 52 Bold Street
53°24′13″N 2°58′47″W / 53.4035°N 2.9796°W / 53.4035; -2.9796 (Marlborough House, Bold Street)
1852–53 Built as a music hall designed by Arthur Hill Holme, it has later been used as a shop. It is in two storeys with an attic, and has three bays facing Bold Street, and six bays on Concert Street. It is in brick and stone, now painted, and is in Italianate style. At the top of the building is a richly carved frieze.[29][30]
58 Bold Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′45″W / 53.4034°N 2.9792°W / 53.4034; -2.9792 (58 Bold Street)
c. 1900 A shop in Arts and Crafts style. It is constructed in stone, with three storeys. The first floor has continuous glazing with iron mullions and transoms, breaking forward into three shallow oriels. In the top floor is a seven-light window.[29][31]
75–79 Bold Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′39″W / 53.4028°N 2.9774°W / 53.4028; -2.9774 (75–79 Bold Street)
1830s These shops are stuccoed, in three storeys, and five bays. They are in Greek Revival style. In the ground floor are three shop fronts with Doric columns, panelled pilasters, a pulvinated frieze, and a modillioned cornice. The central bay of the second floor contains an Ionic portico.[32][33]
92 Bold Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′40″W / 53.4027°N 2.9778°W / 53.4027; -2.9778 (92 Bold Street)
c. 1879 This is a shop in three storeys and three bays with a modern shop front in the ground floor. The two storeys above are in a mixture of Greek and Egyptian styles. The middle storey contains Corinthian pilasters, a frieze, and a cornice, behind which runs unbroken glazing. The top storey comprises an open loggia, also with columns, and at the top of the building is an entablature.[34][35]
25 and 25A Church Street
53°24′19″N 2°59′04″W / 53.4054°N 2.9844°W / 53.4054; -2.9844 (25 and 25A Church Street)
Mid-19th century A stuccoed shop building with four storeys and in three bays. In the ground floor are 20th-century shop fronts. On the first and second floors are pilasters behind giant columns. The windows in the first floor are round-headed windows, the second floor has three windows in moulded architraves, and in the top floor are three three-light windows.[36]
Compton House 33–45 Church Street
53°24′19″N 2°59′01″W / 53.4054°N 2.9836°W / 53.4054; -2.9836 (Compton House)
1865–67 An early purpose-built department store in stone with a slate roof. It has four storeys and an attic, and is in 13 bays. At each corner on the front is a square tower. The front is elaborately decorated, including the statue of a figure representing Commerce.[37][38]
14 Colquitt Street
53°24′19″N 2°59′04″W / 53.4054°N 2.9844°W / 53.4054; -2.9844 (14 Colquitt Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and is in three bays. The windows are sashes under flat brick arches. One window is blind. The entrance is round-headed.[39]
Royal Institution 26 Colquitt Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′40″W / 53.4013°N 2.9779°W / 53.4013; -2.9779 (Royal Institution)
c. 1799 Originally built as the combined house and business premises for the merchant Thomas Parr. In 1815 the building was adapted to form the Royal Institution. It is in brick with stone dressings. The main block is in three storeys with five bays. This is connected on each side by a single storey wall to a pavilion in two storeys with three bays. At the front is a projecting Doric porch.[40][41]
23 Cropper Street
16 and 18 Newington
53°24′14″N 2°58′39″W / 53.4039°N 2.9776°W / 53.4039; -2.9776 (23 Cropper Street)
1847 Shops in three storeys and five bays, with rusticated quoins at the corners and flanking the central bay, which is recessed. On the ground floor are shop windows and a round-headed entrance. In the first floor is a Venetian window. The other windows are sashes.[42]
Juvenile Court 5 Crosshall Street
53°24′31″N 2°59′06″W / 53.4085°N 2.9851°W / 53.4085; -2.9851 (Juvenile Court)
1879–80 This was built as a chapel for the Welsh Calvinists, designed by W. H. Picton, and has later been used as a courthouse. It is built in stone with red granite shafts, and is in Romanesque style with round-headed windows. The building is in five storeys and five bays. It has a gable containing a five-light window with a roundel above, a Lombard frieze and a poppyhead finial.[43][44]
Buckleys Buildings 38–46 Dale Street
53°24′28″N 2°59′18″W / 53.4079°N 2.9882°W / 53.4079; -2.9882 (Buckleys Buildings)
1880s An office building in brick with stone dressings. It has six storeys, and eight bays. The ground floor contains shops, and the windows are rectangular in moulded architraves. There is a cornice over the first floor windows, and those in the second floor have pediments.[45]
Westminster Buildings 90–98 Dale Street
1 and 3 Crosshall Street
53°24′32″N 2°59′08″W / 53.4089°N 2.9856°W / 53.4089; -2.9856 (Westminster Buildings)
1879–80 An office block in Gothic style designed by Richard Owens. It is built in stone with red granite window shafts, and has a slate roof. The building has three storeys, an attic and a basement, and is in six bays. It has a Mansard roof with dormers.[43][46]
Humyak House 13 Duke Street
53°24′10″N 2°59′05″W / 53.4027°N 2.9846°W / 53.4027; -2.9846 (Humyak House)
1864 A brick warehouse with a slate roof in four storeys. The front has a pair of loading bays under round-headed arches in each storey, with a window between them. All the windows and doors have cast iron shutters, and the windows are barred. Inside are spiral staircases, and cast iron columns supporting the timber floors.[4][47]
17–25 Duke Street
53°24′09″N 2°59′04″W / 53.4025°N 2.9844°W / 53.4025; -2.9844 (17–25 Duke Street)
Late 18th century A terrace of five houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys, each house having three bays, other than No 25, which has two bays. The windows in Nos. 17 and 19 are casements, the others are sashes. The entrances are round-headed with Tuscan doorcases.[48][49]
48 and 50 Duke Street
53°24′07″N 2°59′00″W / 53.4020°N 2.9834°W / 53.4020; -2.9834 (48 and 50 Duke Street)
c. 1760s Two brick houses with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in two storeys, each house having two bays; No 50 also has a gable. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrance to No. 48 is round-headed with a Doric doorcase and an open pediment.[48][50]
Monro Public House 92 and 94 Duke Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′51″W / 53.4013°N 2.9807°W / 53.4013; -2.9807 (Monro Public House)
Late 18th century The public house is constructed in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys, with five bays on Duke Street and six on Suffolk Street.[51]
96 Duke Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′50″W / 53.4012°N 2.9806°W / 53.4012; -2.9806 (96 Duke Street)
Late 18th century Originally a house, later a shop and office, in rendered brick, with a tiled roof. Its main front is in three storeys and three bays, with a 19th-century single-storey shop extension. On the ground floor are four arched openings, with three windows to each floor above.[48][52]
98 Duke Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′50″W / 53.4012°N 2.9805°W / 53.4012; -2.9805 (98 Duke Street)
c. 1770s Built as a house, later used as an office, this is in brick with stone dressings and has a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The central entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase with an open pediment.[48][53]
105 Duke Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′51″W / 53.4017°N 2.9807°W / 53.4017; -2.9807 (105 Duke Street)
1800 Built as the Union News Room, designed by John Foster, senior. From 1852 it became Liverpool's first public library, then it was converted into offices in 1862. It is constructed in ashlar stone, and has two storeys. There are five bays on the Duke Street face, and three bays facing Slater Street. On the Slater Street side is a Venetian window with Ionic columns.[48][54]
116 Duke Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′47″W / 53.4009°N 2.9797°W / 53.4009; -2.9797 (116 Duke Street)
Late 18th century A house in brick with stucco and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes with brick heads. The central entrance is round-headed with Ionic columns, a frieze and a cornice.[48][55]
118 Duke Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′47″W / 53.4009°N 2.9796°W / 53.4009; -2.9796 (118 Duke Street)
Late 18th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys with a basement, and has three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases. It was the birthplace of the poet Felicia Hemans.[48][56]
120, 122 and 124 Duke Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′46″W / 53.4008°N 2.9794°W / 53.4008; -2.9794 (120, 122 and 124 Duke Street)
Late 18th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys, each house having three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases.[48][57]
135–147 Duke Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′45″W / 53.4011°N 2.9793°W / 53.4011; -2.9793 (135–147 Duke Street)
Late 18th century A terrace of seven houses, including a shop and offices, in painted brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys with a basement. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels.[48][58]
Warehouse Duke Street Lane
53°24′08″N 2°59′07″W / 53.4023°N 2.9853°W / 53.4023; -2.9853 (Warehouse, Duke Street Lane)
1863 A narrow warehouse in brick with a slate roof, five bays deep. Its gabled front is three storeys high with an attic. The front contains pairs of loading doors and a pulley hoist system. Inside is a spiral staircase. The beams are supported by cast iron columns.[4][59]
1–9 Duke’s Terrace
53°24′03″N 2°58′37″W / 53.4007°N 2.9770°W / 53.4007; -2.9770 (1–9 Duke's Terrace)
1843 A terrace of small back-to-back houses in three storeys with cellars. The front and back are identical, with four steps leading up to the doorways. They are in brick with one window in each storey, and are the only remaining back-to-back houses in Liverpool.[48][60]
Statue of William Huskisson Duke’s Terrace
53°24′03″N 2°58′39″W / 53.40074°N 2.97739°W / 53.40074; -2.97739 (Huskisson Statue)
1846 This statue to William Huskisson was cast in bronze by Ferdinand von Miller in Munich from the marble statue by John Gibson. Huskisson is portrayed standing, wearing a Roman toga, and holding a scroll. This is placed on a granite plinth.[61]
2 and 4 Elliot Street
10–14 Clayton Square
53°24′21″N 2°58′51″W / 53.4057°N 2.9807°W / 53.4057; -2.9807 (2 and 4 Elliot Street)
Mid-19th century Shops in ashlar stone in Italianate style. They are in four storeys, with three bays on Elliot Street and four on Clayton Square. In the ground floor are modern shop fronts. Above, there are balustraded balconies, and the stonework is decorated with features including reclining lions, foliage, and urns.[62]
Gatepiers and gates Gambier Terrace
53°23′55″N 2°58′16″W / 53.39849°N 2.97123°W / 53.39849; -2.97123 (Gatepiers and gates, Gambier Terrace)
c. 1836 These stand on the corner of Canning Street at the entrance to Gambier Terrace. They consist of seven stone gate piers, and wrought iron gates.[63]
3 and 4 Great George Place
53°23′44″N 2°58′36″W / 53.3956°N 2.9768°W / 53.3956; -2.9768 (3 and 4 Great George Place)
1860s This was built as the North and South Wales Bank. It is constructed in stone in Gothic Revival style, and has a slate roof. It is in three storeys with a basement and attic, and has a front of four bays under a pointed gable. The windows have pointed arches, and some are mullioned and transomed. Decoration on the front includes a frieze, and tympana containing the shields of England, Wales, Liverpool, and Ireland, and a central shield with the initials NSWB.[64]
18–21 Great George Square
53°23′52″N 2°58′45″W / 53.3977°N 2.9791°W / 53.3977; -2.9791 (18–21 Great George Square)
Early 19th century A terrace of four houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys with a basement, each house having three bays. The central six bays protrude forward and are surmounted by a pediment. The windows have flat brick arches; those of No. 21 are casements, and the others are sashes. All the entrances are round-headed. No. 21 has a first floor iron balcony.[9][65]
30–33 Great George Square
53°23′55″N 2°58′43″W / 53.3986°N 2.9787°W / 53.3986; -2.9787 (30–33 Great George Square)
Early 19th century A terrace of houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They are in three storeys with a basement, each house having three bays. The windows are sashes with flat brick arches. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases with fluted columns.[9][66]
Former Congregational Church Great George Street
53°23′57″N 2°58′36″W / 53.3993°N 2.9768°W / 53.3993; -2.9768 (Congregational Church, Great George Street)
1840–41 Originally a Congregational church, it is constructed in stone, and was designed by Joseph Franklin. At the northeast is a semicircular portico with fluted Corinthian monolith columns. Above this is a tower surmounted by a shallow dome, with a band of small wheel windows. Along the sides of the church are two tiers of windows between which are Corinthian pilasters. The church was converted into an arts centre in the 1970s.[67][68]
Warehouse Block 12 Hanover Street
53°24′09″N 2°59′09″W / 53.4025°N 2.9857°W / 53.4025; -2.9857 (12 Hanover Street)
1889–90 A curved office block and warehouse in brick and terracotta designed by Edmund Kirby. It has four storeys and is in twelve bays. In the ground floor are large round-arched windows, and above are three- and four-light windows. Between the windows the piers rise to form chimneys, between which is a balustrade. There is a balcony around the first floor.[69][70]
Neptune Theatre 85 Hanover Street
53°24′16″N 2°58′56″W / 53.4045°N 2.9821°W / 53.4045; -2.9821 (Neptune Theatre)
1913–15 Originally built as the Crane Building, it was a shop selling musical instruments, with a theatre above. It was designed by Walter Aubrey Thomas, and is in stone and brick. It has five storeys and an attic, and is in six bays. It is richly decorated externally and internally, the auditorium being in Neoclassical style.[71][72]
Warehouse Hanover Street
53°24′08″N 2°59′09″W / 53.4023°N 2.9857°W / 53.4023; -2.9857 (Warehouse Hanover Street)
1863 A brick warehouse with five storeys and in four bays. It contains round-headed loading bays, and segmental-headed windows with stanchions.[69][73]
Church House Hanover Street
53°24′10″N 2°59′08″W / 53.4028°N 2.9856°W / 53.4028; -2.9856 (Church House)
1885 Originally partly an institute for the Mersey Mission to Seamen and partly a temperance public house, designed by G. E. Grayson, later an office building. It is constructed in brick and terracotta with a tiled roof. It has three storeys and an attic, and is in six bays.[69][74]
2 Hardman Street
25 Rodney Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4017°N 2.9731°W / 53.4017; -2.9731 (2 Hardman Street)
Mid-19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys, and has three bays on both fronts. All the windows are sashes. On the Hardman Street face is an elaborate round-headed entrance with columns and a keystone. On the Rodney Street face is a plain round-headed entrance and a canted bay window.[75]
Former Royal School for the Blind 24 Hardman Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4015°N 2.9713°W / 53.4015; -2.9713 (Merseyside Trade Union Community and Unemployed Resource Centre)
1849–51 This was built as the School for the Blind, designed by Arthur Hill Holme. It is faced with Bath stone, is in two storeys, and has 15 bays. The central five bays project forward and have a pediment. Behind the front the building is more utilitarian. It has a central rotunda from which four wings radiate. The building later became a resource centre.[76][77]
2, 4 and 6 Hope Place
53°24′03″N 2°58′21″W / 53.4008°N 2.9724°W / 53.4008; -2.9724 (2, 4 and 6 Hope Place)
Early 19th century Three brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and have a basement. Each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels, other than those in No. 2, which are casements. Nos. 4 and 6 have Doric doorcases with columns.[20][78]
5 and 7 Hope Place
53°24′04″N 2°58′18″W / 53.4010°N 2.9717°W / 53.4010; -2.9717 (5 and 7 Hope Place)
Early 19th century Two brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and have a stuccoed basement. Each house is in two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. In No. 5 is a canted bow window. The round-headed entrances have doorcases with panelled pilasters.[20][79]
8–22 Hope Place
53°24′03″N 2°58′18″W / 53.4007°N 2.9718°W / 53.4007; -2.9718 (8–22 Hope Place)
Early 19th century A terrace of eight brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and a basement, with each house having two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrances have Ionic doorcases.[20][80]
9–17 Hope Place
53°24′04″N 2°58′18″W / 53.4010°N 2.9716°W / 53.4010; -2.9716 (9–17 Hope Place)
Early 19th century A terrace of five brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and a basement, with each house having two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels, other than those of No. 9, which are casements. The round-headed entrances have Ionic doorcases, other than that of No. 9. At the top of the terrace is a frieze and a cornice.[20][81]
15 Hope Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′10″W / 53.4028°N 2.9695°W / 53.4028; -2.9695 (15 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and slate roofs. It is in two storeys and a basement, and has two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels.[20][82]
17 and 19 Hope Street
53°24′09″N 2°58′11″W / 53.4026°N 2.9696°W / 53.4026; -2.9696 (17 and 19 Hope Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs on a stone plinth. Each house has three storeys and a basement, and both houses are in two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. No. 17 has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns. The columns are missing from the doorcase of No. 19.[83][84]
21 Hope Street
53°24′09″N 2°58′11″W / 53.4026°N 2.9697°W / 53.4026; -2.9697 (21 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in two bays. All the windows have wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed and has a doorcase with missing columns.[83][85]
Masonic Hall 22 Hope Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′12″W / 53.4027°N 2.9701°W / 53.4027; -2.9701 (Masonic Hall)
1872 A hall in stone with a basement and attic. It has two storeys and is in four bays, with a Mansard roof containing dormers. The round-headed entrance has an Ionic doorcase with a tympanum arms. Flanking it are Venetian windows interspersed with round-headed blind windows. Other features include friezes, architraves, pediments, and a balustrade.[83][86]
23 Hope Street
53°24′09″N 2°58′11″W / 53.4025°N 2.9697°W / 53.4025; -2.9697 (23 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. All the windows have wedge lintels; those in the first floor are sashes and the others are casements. The entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase over which is an open pediment.[83][87]
25, 27, 29 and 29A Hope Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′11″W / 53.4023°N 2.9698°W / 53.4023; -2.9698 (25, 27, 29 and 29A Hope Street)
1819 A terrace of four houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Each house is in three storeys with a basement. No 29A has two bays facing Hope Street and three facing Arrad Street; the others have three bays facing Hope Street. All the windows have wedge lintels, and most are sashes; No. 29A has a casement window. All the houses have central round-headed entrances with Doric doorcases.[83][88]
28 Hope Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′13″W / 53.4021°N 2.9703°W / 53.4021; -2.9703 (28 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and slate roofs. It has two storeys with a basement, and is in six bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels, other than one casement. The entrance in an arched recess is flat-headed.[83][89]
30 Hope Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′13″W / 53.4021°N 2.9704°W / 53.4021; -2.9704 (30 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and slate roofs. It has two storeys and is in five bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. Around the entrance are 34 columns, a frieze, a cornice, and a semicircular fanlight.[83][90]
33 and 35 Hope Street
2 Blackburne Place

53°23′59″N 2°58′16″W / 53.3996°N 2.9710°W / 53.3996; -2.9710 (33 and 35 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Each house has three storeys with a stone basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrances have Doric doorcases with stucco archivolts. Two of the houses have first-floor balconies.[83][91]
37 and 39 Hope Street
53°23′58″N 2°58′16″W / 53.3995°N 2.9710°W / 53.3995; -2.9710 (37 and 39 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Each house has three storeys with a stone basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrances have Doric doorcases with stucco archivolts.[83][92]
41, 43 and 45 Hope Street
53°23′57″N 2°58′16″W / 53.3992°N 2.9711°W / 53.3992; -2.9711 (41, 43 and 45 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Each house has three storeys with a stone basement, and is in two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. Nos, 41 and 43 have round-headed entrances with Doric doorcases and stucco archivolts. No. 45 has an architrave with fluting.[83][93]
Former Hahnemann Homeopathic Hospital 42–56 Hope Street
53°24′02″N 2°58′16″W / 53.4006°N 2.9712°W / 53.4006; -2.9712 (Hahnemann Homeopathic Hospital)
1887 A former hospital in red brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in Queen Anne style, and was designed by F. and G. Holme and paid for by Henry Tate. It is in three storeys, with a basement, lower basement and an attic, and forms three sides of a courtyard.[83][94]
47 Hope Street
53°23′57″N 2°58′16″W / 53.3991°N 2.9711°W / 53.3991; -2.9711 (47 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A symmetrical brick house with a slate roof. It has three storeys with a stuccoed basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with stuccoed wedge lintels. Eight steps lead up to its round-headed entrance.[83][95]
49 and 49A Hope Street
53°23′56″N 2°58′16″W / 53.3988°N 2.9711°W / 53.3988; -2.9711 (49 and 49A Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement. Four bays face Hope Street, with three bays facing Canning Street. All the windows have wedge lintels; those facing Hope Street are sashes and those facing Canning Street are casements. No 49A has Ionic columns and an entablature.[96]
53–59 Hope Street
53°23′46″N 2°58′15″W / 53.3962°N 2.9709°W / 53.3962; -2.9709 (53–59 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of four houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in two bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels, other than No 59, which has casements. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases.[83][97]
58 Hope Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4004°N 2.9713°W / 53.4004; -2.9713 (58 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The central entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase flanked by fluted columns.[83][98]
60 Hope Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4002°N 2.9714°W / 53.4002; -2.9714 (60 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The central entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase.[83][99]
61 and 63 Hope Street
53°23′50″N 2°58′15″W / 53.3973°N 2.9707°W / 53.3973; -2.9707 (61 and 63 Hope Street)
Early 19th century Two stuccoed houses with a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes. The windows and the entrances have architraves. In the first floor is an entablature with paterae, and at the top of the house is a frieze, and a cornice.[83][100]
62 Hope Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4001°N 2.9715°W / 53.4001; -2.9715 (62 Hope Street)
Mid-19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. Two of the bays are bowed. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrance has a flat architrave with a cornice.[83][101]
64 and 66 Hope Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4001°N 2.9715°W / 53.4001; -2.9715 (64 and 66 Hope Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. Both houses have round-headed entrances, the windows above them with an architrave, a frieze, and a cornice.[83][102]
65 Hope Street
53°23′46″N 2°58′15″W / 53.3960°N 2.9709°W / 53.3960; -2.9709 (65 Hope Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The central entrance is round-headed with a Doric doorcase flanked by fluted columns.[83][103]
67–71 Hope Street
53°23′45″N 2°58′15″W / 53.3958°N 2.9709°W / 53.3958; -2.9709 (67–71 Hope Street)
1820s Three stuccoed houses with a slate roof in two storeys. They have eight bays, the two bays at each end projecting forward with a pedimented attic. The windows are sashes, those in the projecting bays having architraves, and a round-headed window above them in the attic. The entrances also have architraves.[83][104]
College of Art 68 Hope Street
53°23′58″N 2°58′17″W / 53.3995°N 2.9715°W / 53.3995; -2.9715 (Liverpool College of Art)
1882 The main entrance is in a wing added in 1910. The building is in Neoclassical style, with a Mansard roof. It has two storeys, with 12 bays along Mount Street and 13 along Hope Street. At the centre of the Hope Street front is a rusticated porch with fluted Doric attached columns. This is flanked by two two-storey bay windows.[105][106]
39, 41 and 43 Knight Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4003°N 2.9735°W / 53.4003; -2.9735 (39, 41 and 43 Knight Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in two bays. All the windows but one are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed.[107]
Crown Hotel 43 Lime Street
53°24′24″N 2°58′44″W / 53.4067°N 2.9790°W / 53.4067; -2.9790 (Crown Hotel)
1905 A public house in Art Nouveau style, built in brick and stucco, with marble facing to the ground floor. It is in three storeys with attics, and has 2x3 bays. The middle and top floor have bay windows, and in the attic are lunettes. On the Skelhorne Street side is an inscribed panel. The interior is elaborately decorated.[108][109]
ABC Cinema Lime Street
53°24′22″N 2°58′45″W / 53.4062°N 2.9793°W / 53.4062; -2.9793 (ABC Cinema)
1931 Originally the Forum Cinema, this is was designed by William R. Glen. It is faced in Portland stone and carries little external decoration. The interior contains a gallery and a square proscenium arch, and is more elaborately decorated.[108][110]
Lime Street Station Lime Street
53°24′27″N 2°58′40″W / 53.4075°N 2.9777°W / 53.4075; -2.9777 (Lime Street Station)
1867 The station was extended to the south in 1877–79. The older part has a curved glass roof carried on double iron columns in Doric style. The later part is on square piers. Facing Lime Street is a stone screen with Tuscan pilasters between round-arched openings. On the Skelhorne Street face are Tuscan columns supporting a cornice.[108][111]
Lime Street Chambers Lime Street
53°24′30″N 2°58′44″W / 53.4082°N 2.9789°W / 53.4082; -2.9789 (Lime Street Chambers)
1868–71 Built as the Great North Western Hotel for the London and North Western Railway, this is a stone building with slate roofs designed by Alfred Waterhouse. It is in French Renaissance style, has five storeys with a basement and attic, and is in 21 bays. It has towers at the corners and flanking the entrance. The former hotel has been converted into accommodation for students of the John Moores University.[108][112][113]
Empire Theatre Lime Street
53°24′32″N 2°58′42″W / 53.4088°N 2.9783°W / 53.4088; -2.9783 (Empire Theatre)
1924–25 A steel-framed theatre in brick with a Portland stone front in Neoclassical style. Above the entrance is a steel canopy, and over this is a balcony with Ionic columns and windows behind. At the top is a dentilled cornice. The interior has elaborately decorated plasterwork.[114][115][116]
73–79 Mount Pleasant
53°24′14″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4040°N 2.9738°W / 53.4040; -2.9738 (73–79 Mount Pleasant)
Late 18th century A terrace of brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement. No 73 has an attic and is in four bays; the others have two bays. Most of the windows are sashes. The entrances are round-arched and have Doric doorcases with fluted columns.[117]
2 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4001°N 2.9735°W / 53.4001; -2.9735 (2 Mount Street)
Early 19th century This is a brick house with stone dressings and a hipped slate roof. It has three storeys and is in three bays, and has a cornice at the top. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels.[118]
3 Mount Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4002°N 2.9732°W / 53.4002; -2.9732 (3 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, is in four bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has an architrave and a keystone, and the doorcase has panelled pilasters and a frieze. Above the door is a blocked fanlight with a 20th-century relief of musical instruments.[119]
4 and 6 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4000°N 2.9731°W / 53.4000; -2.9731 (4 and 6 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof, in three storeys and with three bays. At the top is a cornice, and a shop front has been inserted in the ground floor. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels. The middle window in the first floor is blind.[120]
5 Mount Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4002°N 2.9730°W / 53.4002; -2.9730 (5 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, is in three bays, and has a cornice at the top. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The central entrance has a round head and a frieze.[121]
7 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′22″W / 53.4001°N 2.9727°W / 53.4001; -2.9727 (7 Mount Street)
c. 1820 (probable) A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, is in two bays, and has a cornice at the top. The doorcase is flanked by fluted pilasters. To its left is a canted bay window, above which are two blind windows. The other windows are sashes.[122][123]
8 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4000°N 2.9730°W / 53.4000; -2.9730 (8 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows have wedge lintels; those in the first floor are sashes and those elsewhere are casements. The central entrance has flat pilasters, a panelled frieze and a cornice.[124]
9–25 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′20″W / 53.4001°N 2.9723°W / 53.4001; -2.9723 (9–25 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement. Each house has one bay. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are round-arched.[122][125]
27–33 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′20″W / 53.4001°N 2.9721°W / 53.4001; -2.9721 (27–33 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of four brick houses with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement. Each pair of houses is in three one bays. All the windows have wedge lintels; they are a mix of sashes and casements. The entrances are paired and have elliptical arches, semicircular fanlights and Tuscan doorcases.[126]
35 Mount Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′17″W / 53.4000°N 2.9715°W / 53.4000; -2.9715 (35 Mount Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a hipped slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has a flat architrave.[127]
Liverpool Institute Mount Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′20″W / 53.3998°N 2.9722°W / 53.3998; -2.9722 (Liverpool Institute)
1835–37 Originally the Mechanics' Institution, then the Liverpool Institution, and in the 1990s as the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts when the building was expanded. The original part was designed by Arthur Wall Holme in Greek Revival style. It is a stone building in two storeys with a front of nine bays. The three central bays protrude forward to form a tetrastyle portico.[122][128]
10 Nelson Street
53°23′58″N 2°58′38″W / 53.3994°N 2.9773°W / 53.3994; -2.9773 (18 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The entrance is round-headed, and has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns. One window is blind, the others are sashes with wedge lintels.[9][129]
10 and 12 Nelson Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′38″W / 53.3996°N 2.9771°W / 53.3996; -2.9771 (10 and 12 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in two bays. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed, and each has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns.[9][130]
14 and 16 Nelson Street
53°23′58″N 2°58′38″W / 53.3995°N 2.9772°W / 53.3995; -2.9772 (14 and 16 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in two bays. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels. Shop windows have been inserted into the ground floor. No. 16 has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns.[9][131]
20 Nelson Street
53°23′58″N 2°58′39″W / 53.3994°N 2.9774°W / 53.3994; -2.9774 (20 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century This originated as a mission building, later converted into a house. It is in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed, and has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns. On the first floor is a bowed balcony.[9][132]
22, 24 and 26 Nelson Street
53°23′57″N 2°58′39″W / 53.3993°N 2.9774°W / 53.3993; -2.9774 (22, 24 and 26 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century Three houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in two bays. The windows are sashes, above which are wedge lintels. No 26 has a canted shop window. All the entrances are round-headed, those of Nos 22 and 24 have Doric doorcases with fluted columns.[9][133]
44 Nelson Street
53°23′56″N 2°58′41″W / 53.3989°N 2.9781°W / 53.3989; -2.9781 (44 Nelson Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys, with a cornice at the top. The windows have wedge lintels; those on the ground floor are casements, and the others are sashes. The entrance has a panelled doorcase.[9][134]
Queensway Tunnel, entrance Old Haymarket
53°24′33″N 2°59′04″W / 53.4093°N 2.9844°W / 53.4093; -2.9844 (Queensway Tunnel entrance)
1925–34 The entrance to the tunnel was designed by Herbert J. Rowse, and is constructed in Portland stone. Above the arched entrance is an Art Deco sculpture depicting winged bulls.[135][136]
Caledonian Free School Oldham Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′30″W / 53.4029°N 2.9749°W / 53.4029; -2.9749 (Caledonian Free School)
1812 A school and attached house, in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. The whole building is in two storeys with a basement, the school has seven bays, and the house has two. The central three bays of the school project forward under a pediment. The windows are sashes.[137]
96 Paradise Street
10 Hanover Street
53°24′07″N 2°59′10″W / 53.4020°N 2.9862°W / 53.4020; -2.9862 (96 Paradise Street)
1890s An office, originally the Gordon Smith Institute for Seamen, in red brick with a tiled roof. It has three storeys with an attic, and is in late Flemish Gothic style. Nine bays face Paradise Street, four bays form a curved façade to Hanover Street, with a curved bay to Price Street. Features include an octagonal tower, shaped gables with fluted pinnacles, and canted wooden oriel windows.[138]
57 Parr Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′44″W / 53.4010°N 2.9788°W / 53.4010; -2.9788 (57 Parr Street)
c. 1799 A warehouse for Thomas Parr, built behind his house, in brick with stone dressings with a slate roof. It has five storeys and a basement. On the street front are seven bays, with three bays on the sides. There are pediments on three sides. In the 1990s it was converted into student accommodation.[139][140]
25 Pilgrim Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′22″W / 53.4002°N 2.9727°W / 53.4002; -2.9727 (25 Pilgrim Street)
Early 19th century A house in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. It has three storeys, and is in three bays, with another bay facing Mount Street. The windows all have wedge lintels. The windows in the first floor are sashes; the rest are casements.[141]
36 and 38 Pilgrim Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′22″W / 53.4002°N 2.9729°W / 53.4002; -2.9729 (36 and 38 Pilgrim Street)
Early 19th century This is a house and a shop in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys, and are in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels.[142]
Adelphi Hotel Ranelagh Place
53°24′19″N 2°58′40″W / 53.4054°N 2.9777°W / 53.4054; -2.9777 (Adelphi Hotel)
1911–14 Designed by Frank Atkinson for the Midland Railway to replace an earlier hotel. It is constructed in Portland stone on a steel frame. The entrance front has seven storeys, and is in eleven bays. The windows in the first floor are round-headed; the others are rectangular. In the centre of the 4th and 5th floors are Ionic columns in front of three recessed bays. Inside are a series of public rooms in differing style of decoration.[143][144][145]
19 Ranelagh Street
53°24′18″N 2°58′50″W / 53.40503°N 2.98064°W / 53.40503; -2.98064 (19 Ranelagh Street)
1868 A tall narrow stone shop with five storeys, one bay wide. The ground floor contains a shop window. In the first floor is a Diocletian window with carving in the spandrels. The middle floor has a canted oriel window, and above are three-light windows. The gable is flanked by truncated pinnacles.[146][147]
21 and 23 Ranelagh Street
16 Cases Street
53°24′18″N 2°58′50″W / 53.4051°N 2.9805°W / 53.4051; -2.9805 (21 and 23 Ranelagh Street)
Mid-19th century A stuccoed shop in Italianate style. It has four storeys. There are three bays on Ranelagh Street, five on Cases Street, and a broader curved bay on the corner between them. On the ground floor are shop windows, with sashes above.[146][148]
57b and 59–67 Renshaw Street
4 and 6 Benson Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′35″W / 53.4034°N 2.9763°W / 53.4034; -2.9763 (57b and 59–67 Renshaw Street)
1820s A range of shops with a stuccoed exterior. They are in three storeys with attics, and stretch for ten bays, curving around a corner. The ground floor contains shop fronts, with sash windows above.[149]
Grand Central Hall 35–43 Renshaw Street
53°24′15″N 2°58′36″W / 53.4041°N 2.9767°W / 53.4041; -2.9767 (Jerome and Carlisle Buildings)
1904–05 Designed by Bradshaw and Gass, this was built for the Liverpool Wesleyan Mission as a centre for religious and social meetings for Methodists. It is constructed in red brick and yellow terracotta, and has a slate roof. It incorporates Byzantine, Gothic, Jacobean, and Art Nouveau features. Over the main hall is a coffered saucer dome, at the entrance is a domed tower, and there are more domes elsewhere, some of them pointed.[150][151]
1, 3 and 5 Rodney Street
53°24′13″N 2°58′21″W / 53.4035°N 2.9726°W / 53.4035; -2.9726 (1, 3 and 5 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses, constructed in brick with stone dressings. They have three storeys with attics, and each house is in three bays. Each house has a round-headed doorway with a doorcase surrounded by fluted Doric columns and an entablature, with a semicircular fanlight above. The houses have first-floor balconies and sash windows.[152][153]
2 Rodney Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4032°N 2.9732°W / 53.4032; -2.9732 (2 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a stone basement, and is in three bays with a single-storey wing on each side. The windows are sashes. The entrance has a semicircular head, fluted Ionic columns, and semicircular fanlight.[152][154]
4 Rodney Street
53°24′11″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4030°N 2.9732°W / 53.4030; -2.9732 (4 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a stone basement, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrance has a round head with a Doric doorcase. A modern dormer has been inserted in the roof.[152][155]
6 and 8 Rodney Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4029°N 2.9732°W / 53.4029; -2.9732 (6 and 8 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have two storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrances are placed together and have Doric doorcases.[152][156]
7 Rodney Street
2 Maryland Street

53°24′09″N 2°58′22″W / 53.4025°N 2.9728°W / 53.4025; -2.9728 (7 Rodney Street, 2 Maryland Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, with three bays on Rodney Street and six on Maryland Street. The sash windows have wedge lintels, and the round-headed doorways are flanked by fluted columns. Some windows are blind.[152][157]
9–21 Rodney Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4021°N 2.9730°W / 53.4021; -2.9730 (9–21 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A terrace of seven houses in brick, partly stuccoed, with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house has three bays. The windows have wedge lintels; most of them are sashes, with some casements. Features include Doric entrances and porticos, and a Mansard roof with pedimented dormers.[158]
10 and 12 Rodney Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4028°N 2.9733°W / 53.4028; -2.9733 (10 and 12 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys with a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases.[152][159]
14–18 Rodney Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4027°N 2.9733°W / 53.4027; -2.9733 (14–18 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. All the windows have wedge lintels and most are sashes. No. 14 has a round-headed entrance with a Doric doorcase, surrounded by attached columns and an entablature. No. 16 has a modern shop front and casement windows in the second floor. The entrance to No. 18 has a pedimented Doric doorcase.[152][160]
20–24 Rodney Street
53°24′09″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4024°N 2.9733°W / 53.4024; -2.9733 (20–24 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century Houses and shops in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and are in three bays. Most of the windows are sashes. Nos. 20 and 22 have a shop window, and an entrance with an Ionic doorcase. No 24 also has a shop window; its doorcase is in Doric style, and the window above this is a casement.[152][161]
26 and 28 Rodney Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4023°N 2.9734°W / 53.4023; -2.9734 (26 and 28 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century The two houses are in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys with a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows all have wedge lintels. In the first floor of No. 26 are a blind window and two casements; the other windows are sashes. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases, and there are balconies on the first floor.[152][162]
Roscoe House 27 Rodney Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4016°N 2.9731°W / 53.4016; -2.9731 (Roscoe House)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a stone basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The central round-headed entrance has a Doric porch, over which is a balcony.[152][163]
29 Rodney Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4015°N 2.9731°W / 53.4015; -2.9731 (29 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The central round-headed entrance has a Doric porch, over which is a balcony.[152][164]
30 Rodney Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4022°N 2.9734°W / 53.4022; -2.9734 (30 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. One window is blind. The entrance has a flat architrave and a cornice.[152][165]
31 Rodney Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4014°N 2.9731°W / 53.4014; -2.9731 (31 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a stone basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes under flat brick arches. The central entrance has a Doric doorcase, in front of which is a later Ionic porch with an open pediment.[152][166]
Midland Bank 32 Rodney Street
45 Leece Street

53°24′08″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4021°N 2.9734°W / 53.4021; -2.9734 (Midland Bank, Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A bank in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. On the ground floor are Ionic pilasters between casement windows. The windows in the Rodney Street face are sashes with wedge lintels. Those in the first floor of the Leece Street face are mullioned with Gibbs surrounds. Above the entrance are segmental pediments, an oriel window, and a balustrade.[152][167]
33 Rodney Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′22″W / 53.4012°N 2.9729°W / 53.4012; -2.9729 (33 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes under flat brick arches. The entrance has a panelled architrave. Above it is a window, with an architrave, and also a frieze and a consoled cornice.[152][168]
34 Rodney Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4018°N 2.9736°W / 53.4018; -2.9736 (34 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. The side facing Leece Street is stuccoed, with pilasters and blind windows. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes with brick flat arches. The round-headed entrance has a Doric doorcase.[152][169]
35 Rodney Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4011°N 2.9733°W / 53.4011; -2.9733 (35 Rodney Street)
c. 1783–84 Thought to be the oldest building to be completed in the street, this is a brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. At its top is a pediment containing a roundel. The central entrance has a Doric doorcase, its entablature containing a frieze with swags. The window above this has an architrave with a frieze and a cornice, and over this is a blind window.[152][170]
36 Rodney Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4017°N 2.9736°W / 53.4017; -2.9736 (36 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are all sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has an Ionic doorcase.[152][171]
36A Rodney Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4016°N 2.9736°W / 53.4016; -2.9736 (36A Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. The windows are all sashes with wedge lintels. The entrance has a projecting Ionic porch and a glazed doorcase.[152][172]
37 Rodney Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4010°N 2.9733°W / 53.4010; -2.9733 (37 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has a Doric porch.[152][173]
38 and 40 Rodney Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4014°N 2.9736°W / 53.4014; -2.9736 (38 and 40 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. On the first floor are balconies.[152][174]
39 Rodney Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4009°N 2.9733°W / 53.4009; -2.9733 (39 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has a Doric doorcase.[152][175]
41 Rodney Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4008°N 2.9733°W / 53.4008; -2.9733 (41 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a stone basement. The windows are a mix of sashes and casements under brick flat arches. The round-headed entrance has a Doric doorcase with fluted pilasters.[152][176]
42, 44 and 46 Rodney Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4013°N 2.9736°W / 53.4013; -2.9736 (42, 44 and 46 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century Three houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The round-headed entrances have Ionic doorcases.[152][177]
43 Rodney Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4007°N 2.9734°W / 53.4007; -2.9734 (43 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The round-headed doorway has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns. On the first floor are balconies.[152][178]
45 Rodney Street
53°24′02″N 2°58′24″W / 53.4006°N 2.9734°W / 53.4006; -2.9734 (45 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The round-headed entrance has a Ionic doorcase.[152][179]
47 and 49 Rodney Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4004°N 2.9735°W / 53.4004; -2.9735 (47 and 49 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century A pair of houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house has three bays. The windows have wedge lintels and all of them are sashes. Both houses have Doric doorcases, and No. 47 has rusticated quoins.[152][180]
48 Rodney Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4012°N 2.9737°W / 53.4012; -2.9737 (48 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys with a basement and an attic, and is in four bays. The attic and a portico were added later in the 19th century. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. On the first floor is a balcony. The round-headed entrance has a Doric doorcase, and a Doric portico with an open segmental pediment. The attic has a Mansard roof and pedimented dormers.[152][181]
49A Rodney Street
53°24′01″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4003°N 2.9735°W / 53.4003; -2.9735 (49A Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The round-headed doorway has a Doric doorcase with fluted columns. On the first floor are balconies, and the gable on the side has a pediment.[152][182]
50, 52 and 54 Rodney Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′25″W / 53.4011°N 2.9737°W / 53.4011; -2.9737 (50, 52 and 54 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They have three storeys and a basement, and each house is in three bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. Nos. 50 and 52 have round-headed entrances flanked by columns with foliated capitals. The head of No. 54 is straight with a wedge lintel. There are bowed balconies on each first floor.[152][183]
56 and 58 Rodney Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4009°N 2.9738°W / 53.4009; -2.9738 (56 and 58 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Each has three storeys and a basement, and both houses are in two bays. The windows have wedge lintels. Most of them are sashes with casements on the second floor of No. 56. The round-headed entrances have Tuscan doorcases. On the first floor of No. 56 is a balcony.[152][184]
60 Rodney Street
53°24′03″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4008°N 2.9739°W / 53.4008; -2.9739 (60 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in two bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed, and has a panelled doorcase.[152][185]
64–72 Rodney Street
53°24′02″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4005°N 2.9739°W / 53.4005; -2.9739 (64–72 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of five brick houses with stone dressings and a slate roof. Each house is in two bays. All the windows are sashes under wedge lintels. Each house has a doorcase with attached columns and foliated capitals, and first floor balconies.[152][186]
72A Rodney Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4001°N 2.9740°W / 53.4001; -2.9740 (72A Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof, in three storeys and a basement. On the Rodney Street face are two bays, with six bays facing Knight Street. On the corner are quoins. All the windows are sashes under wedge lintels. There are also blind windows.[152][187]
74 and 76 Rodney Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′26″W / 53.4000°N 2.9740°W / 53.4000; -2.9740 (74 and 75 Rodney Street)
Late 18th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and a basement, each house being in two bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The entrances are round-headed with Doric doorcases.[152][188]
78 Rodney Street
53°24′00″N 2°58′27″W / 53.3999°N 2.9741°W / 53.3999; -2.9741 (78 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The central entrance is round-headed, and has a doorcase with flat pilasters.[152][189]
80 Rodney Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′27″W / 53.3998°N 2.9741°W / 53.3998; -2.9741 (80 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed, and is flanked by columns with fluted capitals. At one time it was the home of Lytton Strachey.[152][190]
82 Rodney Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′27″W / 53.3997°N 2.9741°W / 53.3997; -2.9741 (82 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in three bays. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed, and has an Ionic doorcase.[152][191]
84 Rodney Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′27″W / 53.3997°N 2.9741°W / 53.3997; -2.9741 (84 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and a basement, and is in four bays. The windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrance is round-headed and has a Doric doorcase, with fluted columns.[152][192]
86 and 88 Rodney Street
53°23′59″N 2°58′27″W / 53.3996°N 2.9742°W / 53.3996; -2.9742 (86 and 88 Rodney Street)
Early 19th century Two houses in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. They are in three storeys and a basement. No. 84 has three bays, and No. 86 has five. The windows are sashes under wedge lintels. Both houses have an entrance with Doric doorcases flanked by fluted columns. The left side of No. 86 is in three bays and has a pedimented gable.[152][193]
K6 Telephone Kiosk Rodney Street
53°24′13″N 2°58′23″W / 53.40351°N 2.97293°W / 53.40351; -2.97293 (Telephone kiosk, Rodney Street)
1935 A K6 type telephone kiosk, designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. It has a square plan, is in cast iron and has a domed top. The top panels contain unperforated crowns.[194]
Lamp posts Rodney Street
53°24′11″N 2°58′23″W / 53.4030°N 2.9730°W / 53.4030; -2.9730 (Lamp posts, Rodney Street)
Early 19th century There are 14 lamp posts in cast iron that have retained their original lanterns and cylindrical chimneys. They are placed outside St Andrew's Church, and in front of houses numbered 5, 13, 33A, 45, 51A, 55, 2, 14, 38, 54, 68, 78 and 88.[195]
Mackenzie Monument Rodney Street
53°24′10″N 2°58′22″W / 53.40276°N 2.97266°W / 53.40276; -2.97266 (Mackenzie Monument)
1868 A monument to William Mackenzie, railway contractor. It consists of a granite pyramid. It has a blind entrance containing a granite plaque, surrounded by upright supprting a lintel.[152][196][197]
Gate piers and front wall to Church of St. Andrew Rodney Street
53°24′11″N 2°58′22″W / 53.40306°N 2.97283°W / 53.40306; -2.97283 (Gate piers and wall, St Andrew's Church)
1823 The gate piers and the front wall to the Church of St. Andrew are in stone. There are four gate piers at the entrance and two on the corners, all with panelled sides and pedimented caps.[198]
Sunday School Rodney Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′20″W / 53.4032°N 2.9723°W / 53.4032; -2.9723 (Sunday School, Rodney Street)
1872 A ruined building in the churchyard of the Church of Saint Andrew. Designed by H. H. Vale in Italianate style, it is in a single-storey, has an L-shaped plan, and is stuccoed. On the west is a Venetian window, flanked by porches each with dentilled eaves, a cornice and a pediment.[152][199]
45–51 Seel Street
53°24′08″N 2°58′45″W / 53.4022°N 2.9793°W / 53.4022; -2.9793 (45–51 Seel Street)
Late 18th century A terrace of four houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys with basements. No. 47 has three bays, and the others have two. The round-headed doorways are paired, and the sash windows have wedge lintels.[200]
48, 50 and 52 Seel Street
53°24′09″N 2°58′50″W / 53.4024°N 2.9805°W / 53.4024; -2.9805 (48, 50 and 52 Seel Street)
Early 19th century A terrace of three houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. They have three storeys, and each house is in two bays. All the windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The entrances are paired with pediments.[201]
76 Seel Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′43″W / 53.4017°N 2.9787°W / 53.4017; -2.9787 (76 Seel Street)
Early 19th century A brick house with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has three storeys and is in three bays. All the windows have wedge lintels. Those in the second floor are casements; the others are sashes. The doorcase has pilasters, a panelled tympanum, and a cornice.[202]
Doctor Duncan’s 77 Seel Street
53°24′05″N 2°58′36″W / 53.4013°N 2.9768°W / 53.4013; -2.9768 (Doctor Duncan’s, Seel Street)
c. 1800–05 The birthplace of Dr William Henry Duncan, converted into a public house later in the 19th century. It is a stuccoed building in three storeys and four bays. The windows have decorated architraves, including pediments, and friezes carved with laurels.[203]
78 Seel Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′43″W / 53.4017°N 2.9787°W / 53.4017; -2.9787 (78 Seel Street)
1830s A warehouse, possibly originally a school, in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. It has two storeys and a basement, and is in five bays. At the top is a pediment containing a plaque. The windows are casements.[204]
79, 81 and 83 Seel Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′35″W / 53.4011°N 2.9765°W / 53.4011; -2.9765 (79, 81 and 83 Seel Street)
Early 19th century Three houses in brick with stone dressings and a slate roof. No 79 has four bays, and the other have three. No 79 is stuccoed, has casement windows in the ground floor, and a Doric doorcase. All the other windows are sashes with wedge lintels. The doorcase of No 81/83 is in Composite style.[205]
94-104 Seel Street
53°24′04″N 2°58′36″W / 53.4010°N 2.9766°W / 53.4010; -2.9766 (94-104 Seel Street)
1790s A terrace of six houses, with three storeys, each house having two bays. They are constructed in brick with stone dressings and slate roofs. Some of the windows are original sashes; others are later inserted casements. The interiors have been altered, but some earlier features have survived.[139][206]
Saint Peter’s Roman Catholic Church Seel Street
53°24′06″N 2°58′44″W / 53.4018°N 2.9790°W / 53.4018; -2.9790 (St Peter's Church, Seel Street)
1788 Now closed, this was the oldest Roman Catholic church in Liverpool. It is a stuccoed building, in two storeys and six bays. The two-storey porch projects forwards, and incorporates a pediment, fluted Doric columns, a frieze and a cornice.[207][208]
19–23 Sir Thomas Street
45 Whitechapel

53°24′25″N 2°59′06″W / 53.4069°N 2.9850°W / 53.4069; -2.9850 (19-23 Sir Thomas Street)
1860s Stuccoed shops in three storeys with a slate roof. Along Sir Thomas Street are six bays, with two bays on Whitechapel, and a canted bay on the corner between them. All the windows are sashes, some of which are round-headed. On Sir Thomas Street are two balconies with pediments above.[209]
Statue of Major General William Earle St. George’s Plateau
53°24′29″N 2°58′48″W / 53.40807°N 2.98011°W / 53.40807; -2.98011 (Statue of William Earle)
1887 The statue is attached to the southeast angle of St George's Hall. It is in bronze, by Charles Bell Birch, and shows Major General William Earle standing over an African shield.[210][211]
Statue of Disraeli St. George’s Plateau
53°24′31″N 2°58′47″W / 53.40857°N 2.97977°W / 53.40857; -2.97977 (Statue of Disraeli)
1883 The statue of Benjamin Disraeli stands on the steps of St George's Hall. It is in bronze, and was executed by C. B. Birch.[210][212]
Prince Albert Monument St. George’s Plateau
53°24′30″N 2°58′47″W / 53.40822°N 2.97963°W / 53.40822; -2.97963 (Statue of Prince Albert)
1866 This is a bronze statue by Thomas Thornycroft on a stone plinth depicting Prince Albert on a horse.[210][213]
War memorial St. George’s Plateau
53°24′31″N 2°58′46″W / 53.40853°N 2.97948°W / 53.40853; -2.97948 (War memorial)
1930 This consists of a simple block with a bronze relief on each side, one side depicting mourners, with marching soldiers on the other side. It was designed by L. B.Budden and executed by H. Tyson Smith.[210][214]
Queen Victoria Monument St. George’s Plateau
53°24′32″N 2°58′46″W / 53.40883°N 2.97933°W / 53.40883; -2.97933 (Statue of Queen Victoria)
1869 This is a bronze statue by Thomas Thornycroft on a stone plinth depicting Queen Victoria on a horse.[210][215]
Four lions St. George’s Plateau
53°24′31″N 2°58′45″W / 53.40859°N 2.97925°W / 53.40859; -2.97925 (Four lions)
1856 The two pairs of stone carvings of recumbent lions stand to the east of St George's Hall. They were designed by Sir Charles Cockerell, and executed by William Grinsell Nicholl.[210][216]
Lamp standards St. George’s Plateau
53°24′33″N 2°58′46″W / 53.40909°N 2.97946°W / 53.40909; -2.97946 (Lamp standards)
Mid-19th century The 41 lamp standards are in cast iron and each contains a depiction of three dolphins twined around the base. They were designed by Sir Charles Cockerell, and are placed between the west side of St George's Hall and Lime Street.[210][217]
Lodge, St James Cemetery St. James’ Road
53°23′43″N 2°58′20″W / 53.39534°N 2.97234°W / 53.39534; -2.97234 (Lodge, St James Cemetery)
1827 Designed by John Foster, junior, this is a stone building in two storeys with three bays. The ground floor is rusticated with a projecting porch. At the angles are pilasters, with an entablature at the top.[218][219]
Gateway, St James Cemetery St. James’ Road
53°23′43″N 2°58′22″W / 53.39541°N 2.97285°W / 53.39541; -2.97285 (Gateway, St James Cemetery)
1827 Designed by John Foster, junior, the stone gateway has a rusticated archway with pilasters, and a cornice.[220][221]
Carriage ramps and catacombs,
St James Cemetery
St. James’ Road
53°23′55″N 2°58′18″W / 53.39849°N 2.97160°W / 53.39849; -2.97160 (Ramps and catacombs, St James Cemetery)
1827 These consist of intersecting sloping carriageways with rusticated retaining walls containing catacombs. They were designed by John Foster, junior.[220][222]
Rock-cut arch, St James Cemetery St. James’ Road
53°23′54″N 2°58′24″W / 53.39840°N 2.97323°W / 53.39840; -2.97323 (Rock-cut arch, St James Cemetery)
1824 A rusticated archway cut through natural rock forming a northern entrance to the cemetery, designed by John Foster, junior.[218][223]
Huskisson Monument,
St James Cemetery
St. James’ Road
53°23′49″N 2°58′19″W / 53.39703°N 2.97195°W / 53.39703; -2.97195 (Huskisson Monument, St James Cemetery)
1833–34 The monument to William Huskisson was designed by John Foster, junior. It is a stone circular structure in Greek Revival style, based on the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates at Athens. It incorporates a Corinthian colonnade, and has a shallow dome surmounted by a cross.[218][224]
Saint Vincent de Paul Presbytery St. James’ Street
53°23′50″N 2°58′45″W / 53.3971°N 2.9791°W / 53.3971; -2.9791 (Presbytery, Church of St Vincent de Paul)
1856 (probable) The presbytery to the Church of St Vincent de Paul was designed by E. W. Pugin. It is constructed in brick and stone, with a slate roof, and is in Gothic Revival style. It is in two storeys, and has gabled attics. It has an oriel window, the other windows being mullioned.[9][225]
Forwood Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′31″N 2°58′51″W / 53.40848°N 2.98077°W / 53.40848; -2.98077 (Forwood Monument)
1903 A monument to Sir Arthur Forwood, a local merchant and politician, designed by George Frampton. It consists of a bronze figure on a stone pedestal.[226][227]
Retaining wall, gatepiers, and terrace wall St. John’s Gardens
53°24′31″N 2°58′52″W / 53.40858°N 2.98119°W / 53.40858; -2.98119 (Walls and gatepiers, St John's Gardens)
1904 The garden was laid out by Thomas Shelmerdine, who designed the stone walls and gate piers. The walls have a moulded plinth and coping. The gate piers are rusticated and have entablatures.[226][228]
Lester Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′33″N 2°58′53″W / 53.40918°N 2.98146°W / 53.40918; -2.98146 (Lester Monument)
1907 A monument to Canon T. Major Lester, a founder of children's charities, designed by George Frampton. It consists of a bronze figure, standing and holding a child, on a stone pedestal.[226][229]
Gladstone Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′32″N 2°58′52″W / 53.40879°N 2.98109°W / 53.40879; -2.98109 (Gladstone Monument)
1904 The monument to W. E. Gladstone was designed by Sir Thomas Brock. It consists of the bronze figure of Gladstone, standing and holding rolls of parchment and books, on a stone plinth with female figures depicting virtues.[226][230]
King’s Liverpool Regiment Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′32″N 2°58′54″W / 53.40888°N 2.98162°W / 53.40888; -2.98162 (King’s Liverpool Regiment Monument)
1905 Commemorating the service of the King’s Liverpool Regiment in the South African War, it was designed by Sir William Goscombe John. It is in white stone with a bronze wreath, and consists of a figure of Britannia, flanked by soldiers, with a drummer boy behind.[226][231]
Rathbone Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′32″N 2°58′50″W / 53.40896°N 2.98054°W / 53.40896; -2.98054 (Rathbone Monument)
1899–1900 A bronze monument on a stone plinth to William Rathbone. It was designed by George Frampton showing Rathbone as a robed figure. Around the plinth are reliefs depicting his philanthropic works.[226][232]
Balfour Monument St. John’s Gardens
53°24′33″N 2°58′51″W / 53.40914°N 2.98087°W / 53.40914; -2.98087 (Balfour Monument)
1889 A bronze statue on a stone pedestal to Alexander Balfour who died in 1886. It was designed by Albert Bruce-Joy.[226][233]
Nugent Monument St John’s Gardens
53°24′31″N 2°58′54″W / 53.40859°N 2.98173°W / 53.40859; -2.98173 (Nugent Monument)
1905 A monument to James Nugent by F. W. Pomeroy. It consists of a standing bronze figure in an attitude of blassing, and a ragged boy, on a stone pedestal.[226][234]
St John’s House 7–12 St John’s Lane
53°24′30″N 2°58′56″W / 53.4083°N 2.9821°W / 53.4083; -2.9821 (St John’s House)
1896–98 Built for Pearl Life Assurance, this office building was designed by Alfred Waterhouse. It is in stone with a granite ground floor and a slate roof. The building has three storeys and attics. Five bays face St John's Lane, and three face Tryon Street. On the corner between them is an octagonal tower and spire. In the ground floor are round-headed arches containing shop fronts, the first and second floors have paired sash windows, and in the attic are three-light sash windows under gables containing tracery.[235][236]
Telephone Kiosk St John’s Lane
53°24′31″N 2°58′56″W / 53.40862°N 2.98221°W / 53.40862; -2.98221 (Telephone kiosk, St John's Lane)
1935 A K6 type telephone kiosk, designed by Giles Gilbert Scott. It has a square plan, is in cast iron and has a domed top. The top panels contain unperforated crowns.[237]
4 Slater Street
53°24′12″N 2°58′44″W / 53.4032°N 2.9790°W / 53.4032; -2.9790 (4 Slater Street)
Late 18th century A shop built in brick, partly stuccoed, with stone dressings and a slate roof. It is in three storeys and has a symmetrical front of five bays, plus an additional bay to the left. In the ground floor are six round-arched openings, each of which is surrounded by elaborate decoration. A cornice decorated with a Greek key design runs above the ground floor. In the upper two storeys most of the windows are sashes, with one casement window.[238]
6–20 Stanley Street
53°24′27″N 2°59′16″W / 53.4075°N 2.9877°W / 53.4075; -2.9877 (6–20 Slater Street)
c. 1882 Also known as Granite Buildings, these are offices designed by G. E. Grayson, and constructed in granite. There were originally three gables, but the middle one is missing. The building is in four storeys with a basement, and stretches for nine bays. Along the ground floor are five entrances. Most of the windows have three lights, other than those next to the entrances, which are paired, and those in the third floor, which have four lights. Between the windows are cylindrical columns.[239][240]
Mornington Terrace 29–37 Upper Duke Street
53°23′57″N 2°58′24″W / 53.3992°N 2.9734°W / 53.3992; -2.9734 (Mornington Terrace)
c. 1839–40 A terrace of five houses in three storeys and a basement. Each house has three bays, the middle house projecting forward with a pediment. The terrace is constructed in brick with stone dressings, including the base, a string course, a cornice, and a parapet. The roof is slated, and the windows are sashes.[220][241]
Railings and piers to the Oratory Upper Duke Street
53°23′56″N 2°58′25″W / 53.39881°N 2.97355°W / 53.39881; -2.97355 (Railings and gate piers, The Oratory)
1829 Outside The Oratory are cast iron railings with spear heads standing on a low stone wall. The gate piers are panelled, and have anthemion acroteria on caps with pediments.[242]
Bank of Ireland 25 and 27 Victoria Street
53°24′26″N 2°59′14″W / 53.4072°N 2.9873°W / 53.4072; -2.9873 (Bank of Ireland)
1870s The bank is built in brick with stone dressings, and is in four storeys. There are five bays on Victoria Street and eleven bays on Stanley Street.[243]
National Conservation Centre 42 Victoria Street
53°24′28″N 2°59′05″W / 53.4077°N 2.9848°W / 53.4077; -2.9848 (Midland Railway Goods Offices)
1874 This was built as a warehouse for the Midland Railway, and designed by Henry Sumners. It is constructed in brick with stone dressings, and has a slate roof. Externally it is expressed in three and four storeys. In 2005–06 it was converted into the National Conservation Centre for National Museums Liverpool.[244][245][246]
Bank of Liverpool 45 Victoria Street
24 Sir Thomas Street

53°24′27″N 2°59′11″W / 53.4076°N 2.9863°W / 53.4076; -2.9863 (Bank of Liverpool)
1881–82 A bank designed by G. E. Grayson. It is in stone on a granite base, and has three storeys with a basement and attic. There are seven bays on Victoria Street, and five bays on Sir Thomas Street. The ground floor contains casement windows, with sashes above.[247][248]
Crown Buildings 57 and 59 Victoria Street
53°24′30″N 2°59′04″W / 53.4084°N 2.9845°W / 53.4084; -2.9845 (Crown Buildings)
1886 An office, built in brick with stone dressings, with a slate roof. It is in four storeys, with four bays on Victoria Street, and seven bays on Preston Street. At the corner is an octagonal turret with a short spire and an iron finial.[249][250]
Jerome Buildings and Carlisle Buildings 61–71 Victoria Street
53°24′31″N 2°59′03″W / 53.4085°N 2.9843°W / 53.4085; -2.9843 (Jerome and Carlisle Buildings)
1883–85 These are office buildings built by John Cragg, using ironwork from his foundry, for H. Rankin. They form one building, are built in brick with sandstone dressings, and have a tiled roof. The building is in three storeys with an attic and basement, and has six bays.[249][251]
Abbey Buildings 73–79 Victoria Street
53°24′31″N 2°59′02″W / 53.4086°N 2.9840°W / 53.4086; -2.9840 (Abbey Buildings)
1885 An office building and warehouse, constructed in brick with stone dressings, with a slate roof. It is in four storeys with an attic, and has five bays. It is in Tudor Revival, and has three gables, and an oriel window.[249][252]
Baltic Fleet Public House Wapping
53°23′55″N 2°59′12″W / 53.3986°N 2.9867°W / 53.3986; -2.9867 (Baltic Fleet Public House)
1860 A public house in stone and pebbledashing with a slate roof. It is in two and three storeys, and has a triangular plan. Between the windows are Tuscan pilasters.[253][254]
Old Bridewell
Heap's Rice Mill
12–16 Bold Street
Compton House
Humyak House
17–25 Duke Street
Munro public house
Former Congregational Church, Great George Street
Church House
Merseyside Trade Union Community and Unemployed Resource Centre
ABC Cinema
73–79 Mount Pleasant
Entrance to Queensway Tunnel
1, 3 and 5 Rodney Street
33 and 35 Rodney Street
86 and 88 Rodney Street
Doctor Duncan's
Lamp standards, St George's Plateau
Statue of Major General William Earle
Statue of Disraeli
Prince Albert Monument
War Memorial
Queen Victoria Monument
Lions, St George's Plateau
Huskisson Monument
Gateway, St James' Cemetery
Ramp, St James' Cemetery
Rock-cut archway, St James' Cemetery
Forwood Monument
Lester Monument
Gladstone Monument
King’s Liverpool Regiment Monument
Balfour Monument
Nugent Monument
St John's House
Mornington Terrace
Crown Buildings
Baltic Fleet Public House

See also[edit]

Architecture of Liverpool

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ These figures are taken from a search in the National Heritage List for England in May 2013, and are subject to variation as further buildings are listed, grades are revised, or buildings are delisted.

Citations

  1. ^ Listed Buildings, Historic England, retrieved 15 May 2013 
  2. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 8–9, 231
  3. ^ Aughton (2008), p. 292
  4. ^ a b c d Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 204
  5. ^ Historic England. "15 Argyle Street, Liverpool (1268257)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Historic England. "The Old Bridewell, including boundary wall along streets to south and east, Argyle Street, Liverpool (1068393)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  7. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 204–205
  8. ^ Historic England. "No. 23 Argyle Street, Liverpool (1252890)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 208
  10. ^ Historic England. "Heap's Rice Mill, Liverpool (1421261)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 August 2014. 
  11. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 230–231
  12. ^ Historic England. "Nos. 8 and 10 Benson Street, Liverpool (1205573)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  13. ^ Historic England. "Nos. 12 Benson Street, Liverpool (1068379)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  14. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 199, 201
  15. ^ Historic England. "No. 24–30 Berry Street, Liverpool (1393458)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  16. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 239
  17. ^ Historic England. "Blackburne Terrace, Liverpool (1068382)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  18. ^ Historic England. "3 Blackburne Place, Liverpool (1068381)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  19. ^ Historic England. "5 and 7 Blackburne Place, Liverpool (1280631)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 237
  21. ^ Pye (2011), p. 46
  22. ^ Historic England. "Liverpool Institute High School for Girls (1356293)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  23. ^ Historic England. "No. 6–15 Bold Place, Liverpool (1280635)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Historic England. "10 Bold Street, Liverpool (1393093)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  25. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 194–195
  26. ^ Historic England. "12–16 Bold Street, Liverpool (1356313)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  27. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 197
  28. ^ Historic England. "43–47 Bold Street, Liverpool (1280636)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  29. ^ a b Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 195
  30. ^ Historic England. "Marlborough House, 52 Bold Street, Liverpool (1068350)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  31. ^ Historic England. "58 Bold Street, Liverpool (1356314)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  32. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 196
  33. ^ Historic England. "75–79 Bold Street, Liverpool (1068349)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  34. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 196–197
  35. ^ Historic England. "92 Bold Street, Liverpool (1068351)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  36. ^ Historic England. "25 and 25A Church Street, Liverpool (1356328)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  37. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 175–176
  38. ^ Historic England. "Compton House, Liverpool (1206203)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  39. ^ Historic England. "14 Colquitt Street, Liverpool (1068297)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  40. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 201–202
  41. ^ Historic England. "Royal Institution, Liverpool (1206238)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  42. ^ Historic England. "16 and 18 Newington; includes 23 Cropper Street, Liverpool (1070618)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  43. ^ a b Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 144
  44. ^ Historic England. "Juvenile Court, Liverpool (1280320)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  45. ^ Historic England. "Buckleys Buildings, Liverpool (1280189)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  46. ^ Historic England. "90–98 Dale Street (includes 1 and 3 Crosshall Street), Liverpool (1280202)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  47. ^ Historic England. "Humyak House, 13 Duke Street, Liverpool (1392665)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  48. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 206
  49. ^ Historic England. "17–25 Duke Street, Liverpool (1206591)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  50. ^ Historic England. "48 and 50 Duke Street, Liverpool (1206603)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  51. ^ Historic England. "The Monro Public House, Duke Street, Liverpool (1068257)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  52. ^ Historic England. "96 Duke Street, Liverpool (1391231)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  53. ^ Historic England. "98 Duke Street, Liverpool (1206611)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  54. ^ Historic England. "105 Duke Street, Liverpool (1356349)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  55. ^ Historic England. "116 Duke Street, Liverpool (1068258)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  56. ^ Historic England. "118 Duke Street, Liverpool (1206623)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  57. ^ Historic England. "120, 122 and 124 Duke Street, Liverpool (1068259)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  58. ^ Historic England. "135–147 Duke Street, Liverpool (1391054)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  59. ^ Historic England. "Warehouse, Duke Street Lane, Liverpool (1268259)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  60. ^ Historic England. "1–9 Duke's Terrace, Liverpool (1068260)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  61. ^ Historic England. "Statue of William Huskisson, Duke's Terrace, Liverpool (1393705)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  62. ^ Historic England. "Nos 2 and 4 Elliot Street, includes Nos 10 to 14 (even) Clayton Square, Liverpool (1356355)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  63. ^ Historic England. "Gatepiers and gates on corner of Canning Street, Gambier Terrace, Liverpool (1068214)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  64. ^ Historic England. "3 and 4 Great George Place, Liverpool (1356359)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  65. ^ Historic England. "18–21 Great George Square, Liverpool (1298827)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  66. ^ Historic England. "30–33 Great George Square, Liverpool (1068201)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  67. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 207–208
  68. ^ Historic England. "Former Congregational Church, Great George Street, Liverpool (1068202)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  69. ^ a b c Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 203
  70. ^ Historic England. "No. 12 Hanover Street (Warehouse Block between Duke Street, Argyle Street, and Duke Street Lane), Liverpool (1207393)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  71. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 200
  72. ^ Historic England. "Neptune Theatre, Hanover Street, Liverpool (1187370)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  73. ^ Historic England. "Warehouse adjoining No. 12 Hanover Street, Liverpool (1075210)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  74. ^ Historic England. "Church House, Hanover Street, Liverpool (1075209)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  75. ^ Historic England. "2 Hardman Street (includes 25 Rodney Street), Liverpool (1075211)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  76. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 233–234
  77. ^ Historic England. "Former Royal School for the Blind, Liverpool (1279733)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 September 2013. 
  78. ^ Historic England. "2, 4 and 6 Hope Place, Liverpool (1279685)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  79. ^ Historic England. "5 and 7 Hope Place, Liverpool (1279682)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  80. ^ Historic England. "8–22 Hope Place, Liverpool (1075191)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  81. ^ Historic England. "9–17 Hope Place, Liverpool (1343644)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  82. ^ Historic England. "15 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207563)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  83. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 235
  84. ^ Historic England. "17 and 19 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075192)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  85. ^ Historic England. "21 Hope Street, Liverpool (1343608)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  86. ^ Historic England. "Masonic Hall, 22 Hope Street, Liverpool (1343611)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  87. ^ Historic England. "23 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207569)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  88. ^ Historic England. "25, 27, 29 and 29A Hope Street, Liverpool (1075193)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  89. ^ Historic England. "28 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207632)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  90. ^ Historic England. "30 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075197)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  91. ^ Historic England. "33 and 35 Hope Street, Liverpool (1343609)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  92. ^ Historic England. "37 and 39 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207612)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  93. ^ Historic England. "41, 43 and 45 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075194)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  94. ^ Historic England. "Former Hahnemann Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, 42–56 Hope Street, Liverpool (1392424)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  95. ^ Historic England. "47 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207618)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  96. ^ Historic England. "49 and 49A Hope Street, Liverpool (1075195)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  97. ^ Historic England. "53–59 Hope Street, Liverpool (1279638)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  98. ^ Historic England. "58 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075198)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  99. ^ Historic England. "60 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207656)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  100. ^ Historic England. "61 and 63 Hope Street, Liverpool (1343610)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  101. ^ Historic England. "62 Hope Street, Liverpool (1343612)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  102. ^ Historic England. "64 and 66 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075199)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  103. ^ Historic England. "65 Hope Street, Liverpool (1075196)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  104. ^ Historic England. "67–71 Hope Street, Liverpool (1207626)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  105. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 238–239
  106. ^ Historic England. "College of Art (now part of Liverpool Polytechnic), Hope Street, Liverpool (1366066)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  107. ^ Historic England. "39, 41 and 43 Knight Street, Liverpool (1075180)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  108. ^ a b c d Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 185
  109. ^ Historic England. "Crown Hotel, Liverpool (1208085)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  110. ^ Historic England. "ABC Cinema (formerly Forum Cinema), Liverpool (1208090)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  111. ^ Historic England. "Lime Street Station, Liverpool (1293335)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  112. ^ Pye (2011), p. 26
  113. ^ Historic England. "Lime Street Chambers (Former North Western Hotel), Liverpool (1084209)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  114. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 186
  115. ^ Pye (2011), p. 16–17
  116. ^ Historic England. "The Empire Theatre, Lime Street, Liverpool (1252934)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  117. ^ Historic England. "73–79 Mount Pleasant, Liverpool (1363058)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  118. ^ Historic England. "2 Mount Street, Liverpool (1070614)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  119. ^ Historic England. "3 Mount Street, Liverpool (1363062)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  120. ^ Historic England. "4 and 6 Mount Street, Liverpool (1070615)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  121. ^ Historic England. "5 Mount Street, Liverpool (1208433)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  122. ^ a b c Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 238
  123. ^ Historic England. "7 Mount Street, Liverpool (1070613)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  124. ^ Historic England. "8 Mount Street, Liverpool (1208457)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  125. ^ Historic England. "9–25 Mount Street, Liverpool (1208437)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  126. ^ Historic England. "27–33 Mount Street, Liverpool (1363063)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  127. ^ Historic England. "35 Mount Street, Liverpool (1208442)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  128. ^ Historic England. "Liverpool Institute (1363064)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  129. ^ Historic England. "18 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1070617)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 April 2013. 
  130. ^ Historic England. "10 and 12 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1293145)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  131. ^ Historic England. "14 and 16 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1363065)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  132. ^ Historic England. "20 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1293107)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  133. ^ Historic England. "22, 24 and 26 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1363066)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  134. ^ Historic England. "44 Nelson Street, Liverpool (1208493)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  135. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 161–162
  136. ^ Historic England. "Entry to Mersey Tunnel, Liverpool (1070593)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  137. ^ Historic England. "Caledonian Free School and No. 19 Oldham Street, Liverpool (1208635)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  138. ^ Historic England. "No. 96 Paradise Street, Liverpool (1365831)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  139. ^ a b Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 201
  140. ^ Historic England. "Nos. 57 Parr Street, Liverpool (1292976)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  141. ^ Historic England. "25 Pilgrim Street, Liverpool (1365838)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  142. ^ Historic England. "36 and 38 Pilgrim Street, Liverpool (1073000)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  143. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 183–184
  144. ^ Pye (2011), p. 28
  145. ^ Historic England. "The Adelphi Hotel, Liverpool (1365828)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  146. ^ a b Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 182
  147. ^ Historic England. "19 Ranelagh Street, Liverpool (1072978)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  148. ^ Historic England. "Nos. 21 and 23 Ranelagh Street (includes No. 16 Cases Street), Liverpool (1209500)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  149. ^ Historic England. "No 57B Nos 59 to 67 (odd) Renshaw Street, includes Nos 4 and 6 Benson Street, Liverpool (1072942)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  150. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 230
  151. ^ Historic England. "Methodist Central Hall, Renshaw Street, Liverpool (1072941)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  152. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 231
  153. ^ Historic England. "1, 3 and 5 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072945)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  154. ^ Historic England. "2 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072952)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  155. ^ Historic England. "4 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292534)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  156. ^ Historic England. "6 and 8 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361918)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  157. ^ Historic England. "7 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072947)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  158. ^ Historic England. "9–21 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209572)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  159. ^ Historic England. "10 and 12 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072953)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  160. ^ Historic England. "14–18 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209630)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  161. ^ Historic England. "20–24 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361919)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  162. ^ Historic England. "26 and 28 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209641)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  163. ^ Historic England. "Roscoe House, 27 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361915)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  164. ^ Historic England. "29 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209584)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  165. ^ Historic England. "30 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072954)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  166. ^ Historic England. "31 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072948)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  167. ^ Historic England. "3Midland Bank, 32 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292543)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  168. ^ Historic England. "33 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292554)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  169. ^ Historic England. "34 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072955)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  170. ^ Historic England. "35 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072949)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  171. ^ Historic England. "36 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209648)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  172. ^ Historic England. "36A Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361920)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  173. ^ Historic England. "37 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292555)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  174. ^ Historic England. "38 and 40 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072956)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  175. ^ Historic England. "39 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361916)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  176. ^ Historic England. "41 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209599)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  177. ^ Historic England. "42, 44 and 46 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209686)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  178. ^ Historic England. "43 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072950)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  179. ^ Historic England. "45 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361917)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  180. ^ Historic England. "47 and 49 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209603)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  181. ^ Historic England. "48 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361921)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  182. ^ Historic England. "49A Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072951)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  183. ^ Historic England. "50, 52 and 54 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292527)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  184. ^ Historic England. "56 and 58 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072957)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  185. ^ Historic England. "60 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1292528)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  186. ^ Historic England. "64–72 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1209691)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  187. ^ Historic England. "72A Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072959)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  188. ^ Historic England. "74 and 75 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072960)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  189. ^ Historic England. "78 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361651)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  190. ^ Historic England. "80 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1073488)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  191. ^ Historic England. "82 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1073489)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  192. ^ Historic England. "84 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361652)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  193. ^ Historic England. "86 and 88 Rodney Street, Liverpool (1073490)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  194. ^ Historic England. "K6 Telephone Kiosk, Rodney Street, Liverpool (1262038)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  195. ^ Historic England. "Lamp posts, Rodney Street, Liverpool (1361653)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  196. ^ Pye (2011), p. 43
  197. ^ Historic England. "Monument to W. Mackenzie approximately 7 metres to south of church of Saint Andrew, Liverpool (1361914)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  198. ^ Historic England. "Gate piers and front wall to St. Andrews Churchyard, Liverpool (1292580)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  199. ^ Historic England. "Sunday School to north of Church of Saint Andrew, Rodney Street, Liverpool (1072946)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  200. ^ Historic England. "45–51 Seel Street, Liverpool (1292329)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  201. ^ Historic England. "48, 50 and 52 Seel Street, Liverpool (1361674)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  202. ^ Historic England. "76 Seel Street, Liverpool (1361675)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  203. ^ {{NHLE |num= 1073448|desc= Doctor Duncan’s, Liverpool|accessdate= 29 April 2013|separator=,|ps=}|fewer-links=x}
  204. ^ Historic England. "78 Seel Street, Liverpool (1210096)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  205. ^ Historic England. "79, 81 and 83 Seel Street, Liverpool (1292335)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  206. ^ Historic England. "94-104 Seel Street, Liverpool (1073450)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  207. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 202
  208. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Peter, Seel Street, Liverpool (1073449)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  209. ^ Historic England. "19-23 Sir Thomas Street, Liverpool (1360240)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  210. ^ a b c d e f g Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 59
  211. ^ Historic England. "Statue of Major-Gen. Earle attached to south east angle of St. George's Hall, Liverpool (1073461)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  212. ^ Historic England. "Statue of Disraeli on steps to colonnade of St. George's Hall, Liverpool (1361678)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  213. ^ Historic England. "Prince Albert Monument to south of war memorial, Liverpool (1073462)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  214. ^ Historic England. "War memorial to east of Saint George's Hall, Liverpool (1073463)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  215. ^ Historic England. "Queen Victoria monument to north of war memorial, Liverpool (1361679)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  216. ^ Historic England. "4 Lions to east of war memorial, Liverpool (1073464)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  217. ^ Historic England. "41 lamp standards on Lime Street front, Liverpool (1361680)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  218. ^ a b c Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 244
  219. ^ Historic England. "Saint James' Cemetery Lodge next to gateway, Liverpool (1209899)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  220. ^ a b c Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 242
  221. ^ Historic England. "Saint James' Cemetery gateway to south end of Saint James' Road, Liverpool (1073466)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  222. ^ Historic England. "Carriage ramps and Catacombs to Saint James' Cemetery, Liverpool (1073467)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  223. ^ Historic England. "Rock-cut arch in Saint James' Cemetery, Liverpool (1209905)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  224. ^ Historic England. "Huskisson Monument in Saint James' Cemetery, Liverpool (1209902)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  225. ^ Historic England. "Saint Vincent de Paul Presbytery, Liverpool (1209907)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  226. ^ a b c d e f g h Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 65
  227. ^ Historic England. "Forwood Monument, Liverpool (1361683)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  228. ^ Historic England. "Retaining wall, gatepiers, and terrace wall, St John's Gardens, Liverpool (1361684)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  229. ^ Historic England. "Lester Monument, Liverpool (1209928)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  230. ^ Historic England. "Gladstone Monument, Liverpool (1073469)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  231. ^ Historic England. "Monument to the King's Liverpool Regiment, Liverpool (1073470)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  232. ^ Historic England. "Rathbone Monument, Liverpool (1073468)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 29 April 2013. 
  233. ^ Historic England. "Balfour Monument, Liverpool (1209925)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  234. ^ Historic England. "Nugent Monument, Liverpool (1209934)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  235. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 190
  236. ^ Historic England. "St John’s House, Liverpool (1292419)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  237. ^ Historic England. "K6 Telephone Kiosk, St John's Lane, Liverpool (1252897)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  238. ^ Historic England. "4 Slater Street, Liverpool (1292246)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  239. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 162
  240. ^ Historic England. "6–20 Slater Street, Liverpool (1359862)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2 May 2013. 
  241. ^ Historic England. "Mornington Terrace, 29–37 Upper Duke Street, Liverpool (1292040)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  242. ^ Historic England. "Railings and piers to the Oratory, Liverpool (1359856)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 May 2013. 
  243. ^ Historic England. "Bank of Ireland, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1063295)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  244. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), pp. 190–191
  245. ^ Pye (2011), p. 89
  246. ^ Historic England. "Midland Railway Goods Offices, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1062567)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  247. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 167
  248. ^ Historic England. "Bank of Liverpool, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1218392)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  249. ^ a b c Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 168
  250. ^ Historic England. "Crown Buildings, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1063296)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  251. ^ Historic England. "Carlisle Buildings, Jerome Buildings, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1062564)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  252. ^ Historic England. "Abbey Buildings, Victoria Street, Liverpool (1062565)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 April 2013. 
  253. ^ Sharples & Pollard (2004), p. 113
  254. ^ Historic England. "Baltic Fleet Public House, Liverpool (1218452)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 

Sources

External links[edit]