Grade I listed buildings in Bath and North East Somerset

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Bath and North East Somerset shown within Somerset and England

Bath and North East Somerset (commonly referred to as BANES or B&NES) is a unitary authority created on 1 April 1996, following the abolition of the County of Avon, which had existed since 1974.[1] Part of the ceremonial county of Somerset, Bath and North East Somerset occupies an area of 220 square miles (570 km2), two-thirds of which is green belt.[2] It stretches from the outskirts of Bristol, south into the Mendip Hills and east to the southern Cotswold Hills and Wiltshire border.[2] The city of Bath is the principal settlement in the district, but BANES also covers Keynsham, Midsomer Norton, Radstock and the Chew Valley. The area has a population of 170,000, about half of whom live in Bath, making it 12 times more densely populated than the rest of the area.[2]

In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical, or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[3] Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Once listed, strict limitations are imposed on the modifications allowed to a building's structure or fittings. In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[4] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; local authorities have a responsibility to regulate and enforce the planning regulations.

Bath and North East Somerset has 663 Grade I listed buildings, one of the highest concentrations in the country,[5] covered by about 100 English Heritage listings. The oldest sites within Bath are the Roman Baths, for which the foundation piles and an irregular stone chamber lined with lead were built during the Roman occupation of Britain,[6][7] although the current building is from the 18th century.[8] Bath Abbey was a Norman church built on earlier foundations, although the present building dates from the early 16th century and shows a late Perpendicular style with flying buttresses and crocketed pinnacles decorating a crenellated and pierced parapet.[9][10][11] The medieval era is represented by the remains of the city walls in Upper Borough Walls.[12]

Most of Bath's Grade I listed buildings are made from the local golden-coloured Bath Stone, and date from the 18th and 19th centuries. Their dominant architectural style is Georgian,[13] which evolved from the Palladian revival style that became popular during the early 18th century. This led to the entire city's designation as a World Heritage Site.[14] Much of the development, and many of the buildings, were the vision of John Wood, the Elder. The Circus is seen as the pinnacle of Wood's work. It consists of three long, curved terraces that form a circular space or theatre intended for civic functions and games. The games give a clue to the design, the inspiration for which was the Colosseum in Rome.[13] The best known of Bath's terraces is the Royal Crescent, built between 1767 and 1774 and designed by Wood's son, John Wood, the Younger.[15] Around 1770 the neoclassical architect Robert Adam designed Pulteney Bridge, a three-arched bridge spanning the Avon. He used as his prototype an original, but unused, design by Palladio for the Rialto Bridge in Venice.[16] The heart of the Georgian city was the Pump Room, which together with its associated Lower Assembly Rooms was designed by Thomas Baldwin, a local builder responsible for many other buildings in the city, including the terraces in Argyle Street.[17] Great Pulteney Street, where Baldwin eventually lived, is another of his works: this wide boulevard, constructed c. 1789 and over 1,000 feet (305 m) long and 100 feet (30 m) wide, is lined on both sides by Georgian terraces.[18] Outside the city of Bath most of the Grade I listed buildings are Norman- or medieval-era churches, many of which are included in the Somerset towers, a collection of distinctive, mostly spireless, Gothic church towers. Manor houses such as Claverton Manor, which now houses the American Museum in Britain,[19] and the 18th-century Newton Park, which has a landscape garden designed by Capability Brown, also appear in the list;[20] Newton Park now forms part of the Bath Spa University. The most recent building is the agricultural Eastwood Manor Farm Steading, completed in 1860.[21]

Buildings[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by English Heritage as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the building's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building by English Heritage.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Avon (Structural Change) Order 1995". Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO). Retrieved 9 December 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c "About the area". Bath and North East Somerset Council. Archived from the original on 4 November 2007. Retrieved 30 December 2007. 
  3. ^ "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 8 December 2007. 
  4. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 17 December 2007. 
  5. ^ "Owning a Listed Building". Bath and North East Somerset Council. Retrieved 10 November 2010. 
  6. ^ "The History of Plumbing — Roman and English Legacy". Plumbing World. Retrieved 1 November 2007. 
  7. ^ "City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plan". Bath and North East Somerset Council. Archived from the original on 14 June 2007. Retrieved 1 November 2007. 
  8. ^ a b "The Roman Baths and site of Roman town". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  9. ^ "A Building of Vertue". Bath Past. Retrieved 9 December 2007. 
  10. ^ "Bath Abbey". Images of England. Retrieved 25 September 2007. 
  11. ^ Luxford, Julian M (2000). "In Dreams: The sculptural iconography of the west front of Bath Abbey reassessed". Religion and the Arts 4 (3): 314–336. doi:10.1163/156852901750359103. 
  12. ^ a b "Medieval City Wall, with burial ground". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  13. ^ a b Gadd, David (1987). Georgian Summer. Bath: Countryside Books. p. 50. ISBN 978-0-239-00083-5. 
  14. ^ "City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plan — Appendix 3". Bath and North East Somerset Council. Archived from the original on 4 August 2007. Retrieved 1 November 2007. 
  15. ^ a b "1 to 30 Royal Crescent". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  16. ^ Manco, Jean (1995). "Pulteney Bridge". Architectural History 38: 129–145. doi:10.2307/1568625. JSTOR 1568625. 
  17. ^ Colvin, Howard (1997). A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects, 1600–1840. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-07207-4. 
  18. ^ a b "1-7 (Consec) Great Pulteney Street, 36 and 37 Henrietta Street, 4,5 and 6 Laura Place". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  19. ^ Scott, Shane (1995). The hidden places of Somerset. Aldermaston: Travel Publishing Ltd. pp. 16–17. ISBN 1-902007-01-8. 
  20. ^ "Newton Park, Bath, England". Parks & Gardens UK. Parks and Gardens Data Services Limited (PGDS). Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  21. ^ a b "Eastwood Manor Farm Steading". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  22. ^ "1 South Parade". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  23. ^ "1 to 8 Bath Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  24. ^ "1 Henrietta Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  25. ^ "1395789". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  26. ^ "1 - 8 Johnstone Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  27. ^ "Nos 1-41 and attached area railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  28. ^ "No 1 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  29. ^ "1-14 (consec) with area railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  30. ^ "1 - 21, Paragon". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  31. ^ "2-5 Henrietta Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  32. ^ "No 2 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  33. ^ "Nos 3-13 and attached railings and overthrows". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  34. ^ "6 to 21 and attached railings and vaults". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  35. ^ "6-19 Henrietta Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  36. ^ "7-12 North Parade". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  37. ^ "8-20 Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  38. ^ "9-13 South Parade". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  39. ^ "9-15 Johnstone Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  40. ^ "9 to 16 Bath Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  41. ^ "14 North Parade". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  42. ^ "14 South Parade". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  43. ^ "16-22 (consec) and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  44. ^ "20-35 Henrietta Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  45. ^ "23-37 (consec) and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  46. ^ "35 and 36, Stall Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  47. ^ "37, Stall Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  48. ^ "40 Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  49. ^ "41A Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  50. ^ "41 Gay Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  51. ^ "42-52 Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  52. ^ "66-77 Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  53. ^ "Abbey Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  54. ^ "All Saints Church". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  55. ^ "Archway". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  56. ^ "Assembly Rooms". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  57. ^ "Beckford's Tower with attached wall and railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  58. ^ "Castle Keep in the Grounds of Newton Park". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  59. ^ "Chapter House of Hinton Priory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  60. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  61. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  62. ^ "Church of St Bartholomew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  63. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  64. ^ "Church of St Julian". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  65. ^ "Church of St Luke and St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  66. ^ "Church of St Margaret". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  67. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  68. ^ "Church of St Michael and All Angels". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  69. ^ "Church of St Paul, with west wing". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  70. ^ "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  71. ^ "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  72. ^ "Circus House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  73. ^ "Claverton Manor (The American Museum) and screen walls to north and south". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  74. ^ "Combe Hay Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  75. ^ "Delia's Gotto in garden of No. 14". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  76. ^ "Dundas Aqueduct". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  77. ^ "East wing and porte cochere". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  78. ^ "Fountain at Widcombe Manor House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  79. ^ "Gatehouse, 35 m. to west of the Castle Keep". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  80. ^ "Gate piers, gates and boundary walls to south of Widcombe Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  81. ^ "General Wade's House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  82. ^ "George's Hotel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  83. ^ "Georgian House and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  84. ^ "Grand Pump Room". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  85. ^ "Grosvenor House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  86. ^ "Guildhall". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  87. ^ "Hinton Priory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  88. ^ "Keynsham Abbey, remains to the south of No.3 (No.3 not included)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  89. ^ "Keynsham Abbey pier base in the garden of No.3 (No.3 not included)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  90. ^ "King's Bath". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  91. ^ "Lodge of Partis College". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  92. ^ "Midford Castle with former Offices and Coach-houses". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  93. ^ "Newton Park, the Country House of the College only". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  94. ^ "North colonnade at Grand Pump Room". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  95. ^ "North Parade House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  96. ^ "No 1 with railings, Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  97. ^ "No 1A with railings, Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  98. ^ "Nos 1-15 (consec) and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  99. ^ "Nos 1-12 (consec) and attached railings and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 18 August 2013. 
  100. ^ "No 2 with railings, Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  101. ^ "No 3 with railings, Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  102. ^ "No 4 (Alfred Hopkins House) with railings, Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  103. ^ "Nos (consec) and attached lamp standards to No 59, 53-65 Great Pulteney Street". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  104. ^ "Nos 1, 2 and 3". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  105. ^ "Nos 1-20(consec) and attached railings and overthrows". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  106. ^ "Nos. 2-17 (consec) with attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  107. ^ "Nos. 3, 4 and 5 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  108. ^ "Nos 5-11 (consec) Francis Hotel)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  109. ^ "Nos 5-20 and attached walls and railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  110. ^ "Nos. 6 to 11 (consec) and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  111. ^ "Nos 7, 8 and 9". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  112. ^ "Nos 10, 11 and 12". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  113. ^ "Nos 12 and 13 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  114. ^ "Nos 14 and 15 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  115. ^ 1394564 "18 Queen Square". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  116. ^ "Nos. 18-30 (consec) with attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  117. ^ "Nos 18A, 19 and 20 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  118. ^ "Nos 18A, 19 and 20 and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  119. ^ "Nos 21-27 (consec) and attached railings and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  120. ^ "Nos 28-31 (consec) and attached railings and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  121. ^ "Nos 32-34 (consec) and attached railings and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  122. ^ "Nos 35-39 (consec) and attached railings and gates". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  123. ^ "Nos 38-45 (consec) and attached railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  124. ^ "Nos 93-103 (consec) including attached forecourt and railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 18 August 2013. 
  125. ^ "Octagon Chapel (Royal Photographic Society)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  126. ^ "Palladian Bridge in the grounds of Prior Park". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  127. ^ "Partis College". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  128. ^ "Pratt's Hotel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  129. ^ "Prior Park College: The mansion with link arcades". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  130. ^ "Pulteney Bridge". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  131. ^ "Ralph Allen's House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  132. ^ "Refectory to west of Hinton Priory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  133. ^ "Rosewell House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  134. ^ "Shockerwick House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  135. ^ "Shops Nos 1 to 8 (consec)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  136. ^ "Shops Nos 9 to 17 (consec)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  137. ^ "St Catherine's Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  138. ^ "Summerhill". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 August 2013. 
  139. ^ "South colonnade at Grand Pump Room". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  140. ^ "St John's Hospital (including Chapel Court House)". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 14 August 2013. 
  141. ^ "Terrace balustrade to forecourt, Widcombe Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 
  142. ^ "The Cross Bath". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  143. ^ "The Holburne Museum". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 18 August 2013. 
  144. ^ "Widcombe Manor and cottage". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Grade I listed buildings in Somerset at Wikimedia Commons