Grade I listed buildings in South Somerset

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South Somerset shown within Somerset and England

South Somerset is a local government district in the English county of Somerset. The South Somerset district occupies an area of 370 square miles (958 km2),[1] stretching from its borders with Devon and Dorset to the edge of the Somerset Levels. The district has a population of about 158,000,[2] and has Yeovil as its administrative centre.

In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[3] Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Once listed, severe restrictions are imposed on the modifications allowed to a building's structure or its fittings. In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[4] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; local authorities have a responsibility to regulate and enforce the planning regulations.

There are 94 Grade I listed buildings in South Somerset. Most are Norman- or medieval-era churches, many of which are included in the Somerset towers—a collection of distinctive, mostly spireless Gothic church towers—but there are other religious buildings as well. Muchelney Abbey consists of the remains and foundations of a medieval Benedictine Abbey and an early Tudor house dating from the 16th century, formerly the lodgings of the resident abbot.[5] Stavordale Priory was built as a priory church in the 13th century and was converted into a private residence in 1533.[6] The Hamstone Stoke sub Hamdon Priory is a 14th-century former priest's house of the chantry chapel of St Nicholas,[7] which after 1518 become a farm known as Parsonage Farmhouse. It remained a farm until about 1960, and has been owned by the National Trust since 1946.[8]

Since the Reformation the 13th-century Hanging Chapel in Langport has been a town hall,[9] courthouse,[10] grammar school,[11] museum,[10] and armoury[12] before becoming a masonic hall in 1891.[13] The house known as The Abbey in Charlton Mackrell takes its name from the site on which it was built, the Chantry Chapel of the Holy Spirit, founded in 1237.[14] Naish Priory, built around 1400 in East Coker, was never a priory,[15] and similarly the Abbey Farm House and Abbey Barn in Yeovil which date from around 1420,[16] have always been in lay-ownership; "abbey" was added to their names in the 19th century.[17] The 140-foot (43 m) Burton Pynsent Monument was designed in 1757,[18] by Lancelot "Capability" Brown for William Pitt, as a monument to Sir William Pynsent.[19] King Alfred's Tower, a 161 feet (49 m) high, triangular edifice, stands near Egbert's stone, where it is believed that Alfred the Great, King of Wessex, rallied the Saxons in May 878 before the Battle of Edington.[20] The towers funder, Henry Hoare, planned for it to commemorate the end of the Seven Years' War against France and the accession of King George III.[21] The other Grade I listed buildings in South Somerset are manor houses, built over long periods by local Lords of the Manor. The Tudor Barrington Court was the first country house acquired by the National Trust, in 1907, on the recommendation of the antiquarian Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley.[22] Newton Surmaville was built between 1608 and 1612 for Robert Harbin, a Yeovil merchant, on the site of an earlier building, but was extensively altered and enhanced in the 1870s.[23] Lytes Cary and its associated chapel and gardens have parts dating to as early as the 14th century.[24] The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner praised it, saying "Yet all parts blend to perfection with one another and with the gentle sunny landscape that surrounds them."[25] The 17th-century house[26] at Tintinhull is surrounded by a small 20th-century Arts and Crafts garden.[27] Ven House, which stands on an artificially raised terrace, has a rectangular plan of seven bays by five bays, and is built of red brick in Flemish bond, with local Hamstone dressings; its north and south fronts are divided by two giant Corinthian pilasters.[28] The small William and Mary style[29] house was completed sometime between 1698 and 1700. It was enlarged between 1725 and 1730 by Decimus Burton, who provided a new drawing-room for Sir W. Medleycott and also an orangery attached to the house.[30] Brympton d'Evercy, built in stages between about 1220 and the 18th century,[31] has been described, by Auberon Waugh, as "the most beautiful house in England".[32]

Buildings[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by English Heritage as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building/ scheduled monument by English Heritage.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "An introduction to South Somerset". South Somerset District Council. Retrieved 7 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "Population of South Somerset". South Somerset District Council. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  3. ^ "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  4. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 2007-12-17. 
  5. ^ "The Abbot's House, Muchelney Abbey". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2007-09-25. 
  6. ^ a b c "Stavordale Priory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  7. ^ "The Priory, or Parsonage Farmhouse (formerly listed as The Priory or Parsonage Farmhouse (Ruined portion)), North Street (West side), Stoke sub Hamdon". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  8. ^ "Stoke sub Hamdon Priory". National Trust. Retrieved 2007-11-11. 
  9. ^ "The Hanging Chapel and a medieval gateway at The Hill [No:33713]". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  10. ^ a b "Langport". Victoria County History: A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 3. British History Online. 1974. pp. 16–38. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  11. ^ "Gate, Bridge and Causeway Chapels: Chapter 3". English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  12. ^ "Langport and River Parret education pack" (PDF). Langport and River Parret visitor centre. p. 9. Retrieved 8 November 2010. 
  13. ^ a b c "The Hanging Chapel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "The Abbey". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Naish Priory, including attached priory cottage and north boundary railings". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  16. ^ a b "Abbey Barn". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  17. ^ a b "Abbey Farm House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  18. ^ a b "Burton Pynsent Monument". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  19. ^ "Curry Rivel Column (Burton Pynsent)". Folly Towers. Archived from the original on 2008-02-22. Retrieved 2008-07-05. 
  20. ^ "King Alfred's Tower". King Alfred's Tower. Retrieved 25 November 2012. 
  21. ^ Holt, Jonathan (2007). Somerset Follies. Bath: Akeman Press. pp. 46–47. ISBN 978-0-9546138-7-7. 
  22. ^ "Barrington Court Park, Barrington". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  23. ^ a b "Newton Surmaville". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  24. ^ a b "Lytes Cary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  25. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus (1958). The Buildings of England, South and West Somerset. Penguin Books; Reprinted by Yale University Press, 2003. pp. 228–229. 
  26. ^ a b "Tintinhull House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  27. ^ "Tintinhull Garden". National Trust. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  28. ^ "Milborne Port". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 7: Bruton, Horethorne and Norton Ferris Hundreds. British History Online. 1999. pp. 138–156. Retrieved 2009-07-08. 
  29. ^ Churchill, Penny (2006-06-16). "For sale: Ven House, Dorset". Country Life. Retrieved 2009-07-08. 
  30. ^ "The Orangery, attached to the South West corner of Ven House". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 2009-07-08. 
  31. ^ a b "Brympton d'Evercy Brympton House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  32. ^ Waugh, Auberon (1992-08-31). "But life goes on". Way of the World (Daily Telegraph). p. 17. 
  33. ^ "Abbey Farmhouse and farm gate and stile to north west corner". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  34. ^ "Alfred's Tower". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  35. ^ "Barrington Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  36. ^ "Bow Bridge". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  37. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  38. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  39. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  40. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  41. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  42. ^ "Church of St Aldhelm and St Eadburgha". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  43. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  44. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  45. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  46. ^ "Church of St Andrew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  47. ^ "Church of St Barnabas". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  48. ^ "Church of St Bartholomew". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  49. ^ "Church of St Catherine". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  50. ^ "Church of St Catherine". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  51. ^ "Church of St George". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  52. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  53. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  54. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  55. ^ "Church of St John the Evangelist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  56. ^ "Church of St Margaret". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  57. ^ "Church of St Martin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  58. ^ "Church of St Martin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  59. ^ "Church of St Martin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  60. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  61. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  62. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  63. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  64. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  65. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  66. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  67. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  68. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  69. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  70. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  71. ^ "Church of St Mary the Virgin". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  72. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  73. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  74. ^ "Church of St Michael and All Angels". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  75. ^ "Church of St Nicholas". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 23 August 2013. 
  76. ^ "Church of St Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 23 August 2013. 
  77. ^ "Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  78. ^ "Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  79. ^ "Church of St Peter and St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  80. ^ "Church of St Vincent". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  81. ^ "Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  82. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  83. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  84. ^ "Church of the Holy Trinity". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  85. ^ "Church without dedication". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  86. ^ "Coker Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  87. ^ "Corridor linking Ven House and the Orangery". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  88. ^ "Hymerford House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  89. ^ "Main entrance gateway, 35 metres North-West of Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  90. ^ "Manor House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  91. ^ "Midelney Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  92. ^ "Montacute House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  93. ^ "North Cadbury Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  94. ^ "North-east and south-east pavilions to east forecourt, Montacute House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  95. ^ "North-East Pavilion and balustraded brick wall, Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  96. ^ "North-West Pavilion and balustraded link wall, Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  97. ^ "Parsonage Farmhouse The Priory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  98. ^ "Sexey's Hospital west wing, with chapel". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  99. ^ "Swell Court Farmhouse". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  100. ^ "Stabling and other outbuildings, attached to East side of Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  101. ^ "Terrace along South Garden front, Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  102. ^ "The Abbot's House, Muchelney Abbey". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  103. ^ "The Chantry House The Dower House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  104. ^ "The Dogs". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 24 August 2013. 
  105. ^ "The Orangery, attached to the South West corner of Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  106. ^ "Tintinhull Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  107. ^ "Ven House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  108. ^ "Walls, turrets and gateway to east forecourt of Montacute House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  109. ^ "Waterloo House and Manor Court House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  110. ^ "Wayford Manor House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  111. ^ "Whitestaunton Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 
  112. ^ "Wigborough Manor House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 August 2013. 

External links[edit]