Grade I listed buildings in Taunton Deane

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Taunton Deane is a local government district with borough status in the English county of Somerset. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance; Grade I structures are those considered to be "buildings of exceptional interest".[1] Listing was begun by a provision in the Town and Country Planning Act 1947. Once listed, severe restrictions are imposed on the modifications allowed to a building's structure or its fittings. In England, the authority for listing under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990[2] rests with English Heritage, a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport; local authorities have a responsibility to regulate and enforce the planning regulations.

The district of Taunton Deane Area covers a population of approximately 100,000[3] in an area of 462 square kilometres (178 sq mi).[4] It is centered on the town of Taunton, where around 60,000 of the population live[3] and the council are based, and includes surrounding suburbs and villages.

There are 38 Grade I listed buildings in Taunton Deane. The oldest buildings are churches built before the end of the 12th century, and the Castle Bow, which has been incorporated into the Castle Hotel in Taunton but was originally a gateway into Taunton Castle. The castle was created between 1107 and 1129, when William Giffard, the Chancellor of King Henry I, fortified the bishop's hall. It was his successor, Henry of Blois, who transformed the manor-house into a castle in 1138,[5] during the Civil War that raged during the reign of his brother, King Stephen. Taunton is also the site of Gray's Alsmhouses, which dates from 1635,[6] and a building in Fore Street from the 16th century.[7] Most of the Grade I listed buildings in Taunton Deane are Norman or medieval era churches, many of which are included in the Somerset towers, a collection of distinctive, mostly spireless Gothic church towers. Many of the more recent structures in the list are manor houses such as Cothay Manor[8] and Greenham Barton[9] which were built in Stawley in the 15th century. Poundisford Park[10] and Cothelstone Manor[11] were both built in the 16th century and Hatch Court in 1755.[12] The most recent building included in the list is Hestercombe House, which was rebuilt in 1909.[13]

Buildings[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by English Heritage as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building/ scheduled monument by English Heritage.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What is a listed building?". Manchester City Council. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". Ministry of Justice. Retrieved 2007-12-17. 
  3. ^ a b "Demographics". Taunton Deane Borough Council. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  4. ^ "Area: Taunton Deane (Local Authority): Key Figures for Physical Environment". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 2009-04-25. 
  5. ^ "Taunton Castle". Castles and fortifications of England and Wales. Retrieved 2007-11-21. 
  6. ^ a b "Gray's Almshouses". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "The cottage at the rear of No 15 Tudor Tavern". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Cothay Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Greenham Barton". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Poundisford Park". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "Gatehouse, Cothelstone Manor". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Hatch Court". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "Garden walls, paving and steps on the south front of Hestercombe House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Castle Bow". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "Church of All Saints". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "Church of St Andrew & St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "Church of St Augustine". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "Church of St George". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  20. ^ "Church of St Gregory". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  21. ^ "Church of St James". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  22. ^ "Church of St Lawrence". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  23. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  24. ^ "Church of St John the Baptist". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  25. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  26. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  27. ^ "Church of St Mary". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  28. ^ "Church of St Mary Magdalene". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  29. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  30. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  31. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  32. ^ "Church of St Michael". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  33. ^ "Church of St. Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  34. ^ "Church of St. Peter". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  35. ^ "Church of St Peter & St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  36. ^ "Church of St Peter & St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  37. ^ "Church of St Peter & St Paul". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  38. ^ "Church of the Holy Cross". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  39. ^ "Church of St Thomas of Canterbury". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  40. ^ "Orangery about 50 metres east of Hestercombe House". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  41. ^ "Shell keep castle, part of the associated outer bailey, ninth century cemetery and a Civil War siegework at Taunton Castle". National heritage list for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 20 July 2013. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Grade I listed buildings in Somerset at Wikimedia Commons