Graham Bright

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Sir Graham Bright
Police and Crime Commissioner
for Cambridgeshire Constabulary
Incumbent
Assumed office
15 November 2012
Preceded by Office created
Member of Parliament
for Luton South
In office
9 June 1983 – 1 May 1997
Preceded by Constituency Created
Succeeded by Margaret Moran
Member of Parliament
for Luton East
In office
3 May 1979 – 9 June 1983
Preceded by Ivor Clemitson
Succeeded by Constituency Abolished
Personal details
Born (1942-04-02) 2 April 1942 (age 72)
Horndon-on-the-Hill, Essex
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Lady Valerie Bright
Children Dr Rupert Bright
Religion Christian

Sir Graham Frank James Bright (born 2 April 1942, in Horndon-on-the-Hill, Essex) is a British politician and businessman. A member of the Conservative Party, he served as a member of parliament (MP) from 1979 to 1997. He is currently the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cambridgeshire Constabulary.

Political career[edit]

An active Young Conservative, he cut his political teeth as a member of Thurrock Borough Council from 1965–79, and of Essex County Council from 1967–70. He stood unsuccessfully for Parliament in 1970 and 1974 in Thurrock, and in Dartford at the second general election of 1974, before being elected in Luton South in 1979.[1] After constituency boundary changes, he transferred to Luton South at the 1983 general election, holding the seat until his defeat at the 1997 general election by Labour's Margaret Moran.

During his time in Parliament, Bright served as a Parliamentary Private Secretary (PPS) to various members of the Cabinet for 18 years, most notably to John Major for his first four years as Prime Minister (1990–94). Bright then went on to serve as a Vice-Chairman of the Conservative Party from 1994–97. He received a knighthood in 1994.

Bright introduced two Private Member's Bills to the House of Commons which became law. The first, introduced in 1983 was passed as the Video Recordings Act 1984 that required all commercial video recordings offered for sale or for hire within the UK to carry a classification. Bright claimed in an interview at this time that such videos were not only damaging to children, but also 'to dogs'.[2]

The second,[3] introduced in 1990 was the often referred to as the "Acid House [parties] Bill"[4] became the Entertainments (Increased Penalties) Act 1990. In material relating to his candidature for Cambridgeshire's Police and Crime Commissioner Bright has described these Bills as being "aimed at protecting young people."[5]

In September 2012 Bright was selected by the Conservative party to be their candidate in the election for Cambridgeshire's Police and Crime Commissioner.[6] He won the election in November that year,[7] and appointed his Party and business colleague Brian Ashton as his deputy without advertising the post.[8] In December 2012 Bright called for a crackdown on "anti-social" and "dangerous" cyclists.[9] In November 2013 he said that bicycle helmets should be compulsory.[10]

In February 2014 Bright hit controversy by pulling out of a Cambridge policing meeting with residents for a third time because it was due to finish too late in the evening.[11]

Outside politics[edit]

Until he was 15, Bright was educated at Hassenbrook Secondary Modern School in Stanford-le-Hope. He later took courses at Thurrock Technical College. Outside politics, he worked as a marketing executive, factory manager and company director. He claims to have built up a business producing "Sweet’N Low sachets".[12]

Bright was also featured in the infamous comedy programme, Brass Eye, although after successfully complaining to the Independent Television Commission clips featuring him were removed from all subsequent broadcasts.[13][14] [15]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Ivor Clemitson
Member of Parliament for Luton East
19791983
Constituency abolished
New constituency Member of Parliament for Luton South
19831997
Succeeded by
Margaret Moran