Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance

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Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality female rap performances
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 2003
Last awarded 2004
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance was an honor presented to female recording artists at the 45th Grammy Awards in 2003 and the 46th Grammy Awards in 2004 for quality rap solo performances. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Beginning in 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. In 2003, the category was split into separate recognitions for Female and Male Rap Solo Performances. The categories remained separated by gender until 2005 when they were combined into the genderless category originally known as Best Rap Solo Performance. American singer Missy Elliott won the award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance both years it was presented.[3]

Background[edit]

In 1991, the Academy began to honor individual rap performances with the Best Rap Solo Performance category. The category name remained unchanged until 2004 when it was split into separate categories for Female and Male Rap Solo Performances. The categories remained separated by gender for one additional year. In 2005, they were merged into the genderless category originally known as Best Rap Solo Performance.[4] Female rapper MC Lyte has campaigned for the reinstatement of the female-specific category and believes that "it destroys [hip-hop] culture to not have the perspective of a woman".[4] Bill Freimuth, Recording Academy Vice President of Awards,[5] claimed that the category was eliminated because "it wasn't enough competition essentially, due to the lack of the number of releases in that category."[3] Black Entertainment Television (BET) executive Stephen Hill cited a similar reason for the elimination of the female categories by the BET Hip Hop Awards and VH1's Hip Hop Honors,[4] reflecting a lack of female representation in the hip hop music scene for several years.[3] As of 2011, the category name has not changed since 2005.

Recipients[edit]

Two-time award winner Missy Elliott in 2010

For the 45th Grammy Awards (2003), Best Female Rap Solo Performance nominees included Charli Baltimore for "Diary...", Missy Elliott for "Scream a.k.a. Itchin'", Eve for "Satisfaction", Foxy Brown for "Na Na Be Like", and Lauryn Hill for "Mystery of Iniquity".[6] Baltimore's reaction was considered "outright denial" when she learned of her album's nomination because she thought her album did not meet eligibility requirements.[7] Elliott was also nominated for Best Short Form Music Video, along with Knoc-turn'al and Dr. Dre, for "Knoc".[8] The award was presented to Elliott at Madison Square Garden in New York City, though not broadcast on television.[9]

Nominees for the 46th Grammy Awards included Da Brat for "Got It Poppin'", Elliott for "Work It", Lil' Kim for "Came Back for You", MC Lyte for "Ride Wit Me", and Queen Latifah for "Go Head".[10] Elliott's additional nominations included Album of the Year and Best Rap Album for Under Construction, Best Song Rap for "Work It", and Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group for "Gossip Folks" (featuring Ludacris), totaling five.[11][12] Lil' Kim was also nominated for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals for "Can't Hold Us Down" (with Christina Aguilera) and Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group for "Magic Stick" (featuring 50 Cent).[13] The award was presented to Elliott for "Work It", the music video for which was awarded Video of the Year and Best Hip-Hop Video at the 2003 MTV Video Music Awards.[14]

Elliott won the award for Best Female Rap Solo Performance both years it was presented. Prior to the separate female and male categories, Elliot received the award for Best Rap Solo Performance in 2002 for "Get Ur Freak On".[15] This marked the second time a female received the award for Best Rap Solo Performance (Queen Latifah was presented the honor for "U.N.I.T.Y." at the 37th Grammy Awards in 1995).[16] In 2007, following the return to the genderless category, Elliot was nominated for the song "We Run This".[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Fekadu, Mesfin (August 18, 2010). "Nicki Minaj revives female voice in rap". The San Diego Union-Tribune (Platinum Equity). Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c Watson, Margeaux (September 26, 2008). "BET and VH1 Present…Awards Shows Without Women". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Flashback: Bill Freimuth". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 3. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  7. ^ D'Angelo, Joe (February 21, 2003). "From 'Damn!' To Disbelief: Artists React To Their Grammy Nods". MTV. Retrieved February 22, 2011.  Note: Additional reporting by John Norris, Minya Oh, and Shaheem Reid.
  8. ^ "MTV News: 45th Annual Grammy Awards". MTV. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  9. ^ D'Angelo, Joe (February 24, 2003). "Norah Jones Sweeps Grammys, Boss Wins Three, Avril Shut Out". MTV. Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Grammy Award Winners". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  11. ^ Susman, Gary (December 4, 2003). "Grammylicious". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  12. ^ Shiver Jr., Jube (February 9, 2004). "In Virginia Beach, an unlikely hip-hop hotbed". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved February 22, 2011. 
  13. ^ "2004 Grammy Winners". MTV. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  14. ^ "2003 MTV Video Music Awards Winners List". MTV. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  15. ^ "The 2002 Grammy winners". San Francisco Chronicle. February 28, 2002. p. 1. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Grammy Stars". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 114 (10): 83. March 9, 2002. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  17. ^ "49th Annual Grammy Nominees". CBS News. December 7, 2006. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 

External links[edit]