Grammy Award for Best Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music Performance

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Grammy Award for Best Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music Performance
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality vocal or instrumental gospel and CCM recordings
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music Performance is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards.[1] According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide it is designed for solo, duo/groups or collaborative (vocal or instrumental) gospel or Contemporary Christian music (CCM) and its subgenres' recordings and is limited to singles or tracks only.[2]

This award was first handed out in 1968 under the name of Best Gospel Performance and was intended for albums only.

In 1971 the award was renamed to Best Gospel Performance (other than soul gospel), including both singles and albums, and ran until 1978 when the award was divided into two new awards, the Grammy Awards for Best Gospel Performance, Traditional and Best Gospel Performance, Contemporary.

The category was then revived in 2005 and it was known once again under the name of Best Gospel Performance. In 2012, following a major overhaul of the Grammy categories, this award was renamed as Best Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music Performance which was eligible for all sub-genres in the gospel/Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) field.

From 2015, due to a restructuring of the Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music category field, this category will merge with the Best Contemporary Christian Music Song to create the new Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song category, which will recognize both performers and songwriters of Contemprary Christian Music songs (Gospel performances will now fall under the Best Gospel Performance/Song category). According to the Grammy committee, "changes to the field were made in the interest of clarifying the criteria, representing the current culture and creative DNA of the gospel and Contemporary Christian Music communities, and better reflecting the diversity and authenticity of today's gospel music industry".[3]

The Blackwood Brothers hold the record for most awards in this category with four wins, two of them alongside Porter Wagoner. They also hold the record for most nominations, with seven. Two-time winners include Porter Wagoner, The Oak Ridge Boys, Karen Clark Sheard and CeCe Winans.

Recipients[edit]

Two-time award winner Porter Wagoner
The Oak Ridge Boys have won the award twice
2007 winner Yolanda Adams
Mary J. Blige won the award in 2008 alongside Aretha Franklin and tied with The Clark Sisters
2009 winners Mary Mary
Karen Clark Sheard winner in 2008 and 2010
Year Winning artist Work Other nominees Ref.
1968 Porter Wagoner & The Blackwood Brothers Quartet More Grand Old Gospel [4]
1969 Happy Goodman Family The Happy Gospel of the Happy Goodmans N/A [5]
1970 Porter Wagoner & The Blackwood Brothers Quartet In Gospel Country [6]
1971 Oak Ridge Boys Talk About the Good Times [7]
1972 Charley Pride Let Me Live Lyrics [8]
1973 Blackwood Brothers L-O-V-E [9]
1974 Blackwood Brothers Release Me (from My Sin) [10]
1976 The Imperials No Shortage [11]
1977 Oak Ridge Boys Where the Soul Never Dies [12]
2005 Ray Charles & Gladys Knight "Heaven Help Us All" [13]
2006 CeCe Winans "Pray" [14]
2007 Yolanda Adams "Victory" [15]
2008
(tie)
The Clark Sisters
Aretha Franklin & Mary J. Blige


United States

"Blessed & Highly Favored"
"Never Gonna Break My Faith"
[16]
2009 Mary Mary "Get Up" [17]
2010 Donnie McClurkin featuring Karen Clark Sheard "Wait On The Lord" [18]
2011 BeBe and CeCe Winans "Grace" [19]
2012 Le'Andria Johnson "Jesus" [20]
2013 Matt Redman "10,000 Reasons (Bless The Lord)" [21]
2014 Tasha Cobbs Break Every Chain (Live) [22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Category Mapper". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 25, 2011. 
  3. ^ Grammy.com, 12 June 2014
  4. ^ "Grammy Awards 1968". Awards & Shows. 
  5. ^ "Grammy Awards 1969 winners". Infoplease. 
  6. ^ "Grammy Awards 1970". Awards & Shows. 
  7. ^ "Grammy Awards 1971". Awards & Shows. 
  8. ^ "Grammy Awards 1972". Awards & Shows. 
  9. ^ "Grammy Awards 1973". Awards & Shows. 
  10. ^ "Grammy Awards 1974". Awards & Shows. 
  11. ^ "Grammy Awards 1976". Awards & Shows. 
  12. ^ "Grammy Awards 1977". Awards & Shows. 
  13. ^ "Grammy Award nominees in top categories". USA Today (Gannett Company). February 7, 2005. Retrieved July 12, 2010. 
  14. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 8, 2005. p. 3. Retrieved July 12, 2010. 
  15. ^ "The 49th Annual GRAMMY Awards Roundup: Gospel Field". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved December 26, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Grammy 2008 Winners List". MTV. February 10, 2008. Retrieved July 12, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Complete List of Nominees for the 51st Annual Grammy Awards". E! Online. December 8, 2008. Retrieved December 26, 2011. 
  18. ^ "52nd Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees And Winners: Gospel Field". The Recording Academy. Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  19. ^ "53rd Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees And Winners: Gospel Field". The Recording Academy. Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  20. ^ "54th Annual GRAMMY Awards Nominees And Winners: Gospel Field". The Recording Academy. Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  21. ^ "2013 Grammy Nominations Revealed *Updated*". ThatGrapeJuice. Retrieved 6 December 2012. 
  22. ^ 2014 Nominations

External links[edit]