Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album

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Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality reggae albums
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1985
Last awarded 2014
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album is an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to recording artists for quality works in the reggae music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Recording, the honor was presented to artists for eligible songs or albums. The Jamaican group Black Uhuru received the first award in 1985. Beginning with the 1992 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Reggae Album. Starting in 2002, awards were often presented to the engineers, mixers, and/or producers in addition to the performing artists. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, eligible works are vocal or instrumental reggae albums "containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded music", including roots reggae, dancehall and ska music.[3]

Stephen Marley holds the record for the most wins in this category, with six wins total (three times as a member of the band Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers). Similarly, Ziggy Marley has been presented the award four times total, three times as the leader of his eponymous band. Bunny Wailer has received the award three times, and two-time recipients include Burning Spear, Damian Marley, and Shabba Ranks. Jamaican artists have been presented with the award more than any other nationality. Buju Banton's nomination for the 2010 award sparked controversy and protest from the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation due to homophobic lyrics within his music.[4]

Recipients[edit]

A man in red clothing singing into a microphone.
1986 award recipient Jimmy Cliff in 1997
A man behind a microphone on a stand with his eyes closed, wearing a green jacket and holding a guitar.
Five-time award winner Stephen Marley (three times as a member of the band Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers) in 2007
A man wearing a purple jacket and blue jeans, holding a multi-colored guitar and standing behind a microphone on a stand.
Four-time award winner Ziggy Marley (three times as the leader of his eponymous band), performing at the Austin City Limits Music Festival in 2007
A man with his mouth open, holding a microphone; he is wearing sunglasses, a hat, and multiple layers of multi-colored clothing, including a cape.
Three-time award winner Bunny Wailer, performing in 2009
A man holding a microphone with one hard and extending his index finger with the other; he is wearing a white undershirt, red- and white-striped dress shirt and jewelry accessories. In the background is a man and vegetation.
1996 award winner Shaggy, performing in 2006
Black and white image of a man with dreadlocks wearing eyeglasses.
2001 award winner Beenie Man in 2008
A man holding a microphone on a stage and wearing a blue denim jacket and jeans. Onlookers and a few microphone stand can be seen in the background.
Two-time award winner Damian Marley, performing in 2008
A man singing into a microphone; he is wearing a colorful hat with many accessories on his hat and around his wrists, fingers and neck.
2003 award recipient Lee "Scratch" Perry, performing in 2008
A man saluting with his right hand and wearing a black graphic T-shirt and black jeans. In the background is a palm tree, a few bottles of rum, and a screen with branding across it.
2004 award winner, Sean Paul
Year[I] Performing artist(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1985 Black Uhuru Anthem [5]
1986 Cliff, JimmyJimmy Cliff Cliff Hanger [6]
1987 Steel Pulse Babylon the Bandit [7]
1988 Tosh, PeterPeter Tosh No Nuclear War [8]
1989 Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers Conscious Party [9]
1990 Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers One Bright Day [10]
1991 Bunny Wailer Time Will Tell: A Tribute to Bob Marley [11]
1992 Shabba Ranks As Raw As Ever [12]
1993 Shabba Ranks X-tra Naked [13]
1994 Inner Circle "Bad Boys" [14]
1995 Bunny Wailer Crucial! Roots Classics [15]
1996 Shaggy Boombastic [16]
1997 Bunny Wailer Hall of Fame: A Tribute to Bob Marley's 50th Anniversary [17]
1998 Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers Fallen Is Babylon [18]
1999 Sly and Robbie Friends [19]
2000 Burning Spear Calling Rastafari [20]
2001 Beenie Man Art and Life [21]
2002 Marley, DamianDamian Marley Halfway Tree [22]
2003 Perry, Lee "Scratch"Lee "Scratch" Perry Jamaican E.T. [23]
2004 Paul, SeanSean Paul Dutty Rock [24]
2005 Toots & the Maytals True Love [25]
2006 Marley, DamianDamian Marley Welcome to Jamrock [26]
2007 Marley, ZiggyZiggy Marley Love Is My Religion [27]
2008 Marley, StephenStephen Marley Mind Control [28]
2009 Burning Spear Jah Is Real [29]
2010 Marley, StephenStephen Marley Mind Control – Acoustic [30]
2011 Banton, BujuBuju Banton Before the Dawn [31]
2012 Stephen Marley Revelation Pt. 1 – The Root of Life
2013 Jimmy Cliff Rebirth [32]
2014 Ziggy Marley In Concert

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

2010 controversy[edit]

A man on a stage in white clothing, holding a microphone and bending over. In the background are women standing behind microphones.
2010 nominee and subject of controversy Buju Banton, performing in 2007

Buju Banton's (real name Mark Anthony Myrie) nomination for the 2010 award sparked controversy and protest due to homophobic lyrics within his music.[4][33] Banton's most controversial song, released in 1988, is "Boom, Bye Bye", which "promote[s] the murder of gay men by shooting or burning".[34] Following the artist's nomination, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Center placed an advertisement in the Daily Variety encouraging Grammy officials to denounce music that "promotes or celebrates violence against any group of people".[4] The advertisement, which took the form of a letter signed by gay rights and civil rights activists, asserted that honoring Banton was awarding "extraordinary hateful work". The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences responded by insisting that artists are honored for quality music "regardless of politics". Banton has been quoted as saying that he sees "no end to the war" between himself and gay men.[4][35] The 2010 award was presented to Stephen Marley. Banton was nominated in 2011 for the album Before the Dawn.[31] Other reggae musicians that have been accused of promoting anti-gay lyrics include Beenie Man, Elephant Man, Vybz Kartel, Shabba Ranks and Sizzla.[36][37]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ "52nd OEP Category Description Guide" (PDF). National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. p. 5. Retrieved November 16, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d Serjeant, Jill (January 29, 2010). "Gay groups urge Grammys to denounce Buju Banton". Reuters. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Nominations Listed by Categories for 27th Annual Grammy Awards". Schenectady Gazette (Schenectady, New York). January 12, 1985. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 15, 1988). "U2, Jackson Top Grammy Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 5. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  7. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 9, 1987). "Grammy Nominations: Highs And Lows". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 5. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Grammy Nominations". The San Diego Union-Tribune. January 15, 1988. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  9. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 13, 1989). "Chapman, McFerrin Lead Grammy Race: Baker, Sting, Michael, Winwood Also Capture Multiple Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 6. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  10. ^ Silverman, David (January 12, 1990). "Grammy Nominations Break With Tradition". Chicago Tribune (Tribune Company). p. 3. Retrieved June 24, 2010. 
  11. ^ "List of Grammy nominations". Times-News (Hendersonville, North Carolina: The New York Times Company). January 11, 1991. Retrieved June 24, 2010. 
  12. ^ "34th Grammy Awards – 1992". Rock on the Net. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  13. ^ "35th Grammy Awards – 1993". Rock on the Net. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  14. ^ "36th Grammy Awards – 1994". Rock on the Net. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  15. ^ "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 6, 1995. p. 7. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  16. ^ "List of Grammy nominees". CNN. January 4, 1996. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  17. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 8, 1997. p. 7. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominations". USA Today (Gannett Company). Retrieved November 27, 2010. [dead link]
  19. ^ "41st Grammy Awards – 1999". Rock on the Net. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  20. ^ "And the nominees are...". USA Today (Gannett Company). February 22, 2000. Retrieved November 27, 2010. [dead link]
  21. ^ McCallister, Jared (January 28, 2001). "Air Jamaica Flying to Trinidad". Daily News (New York City, New York: Mortimer Zuckerman). Retrieved June 21, 2010. [dead link]
  22. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Retrieved June 21, 2010. 
  23. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 4. Retrieved June 22, 2010. [dead link]
  24. ^ "46th Grammy Awards – 2004". Rock on the Net. Retrieved January 17, 2011. 
  25. ^ "47th Grammy Awards – 2005". Rock on the Net. Retrieved January 17, 2011. 
  26. ^ "Blues, Folk, Reggae and World Music Nominees and Winners". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  27. ^ "49th Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  28. ^ "50th annual Grammy Awards nominations (part II)". Variety (Reed Business Information). December 6, 2007. Retrieved June 22, 2010. [dead link]
  29. ^ "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  30. ^ "The 52nd Annual Grammy Awards Nominees List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 22, 2010. 
  31. ^ a b "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved December 2, 2010. 
  32. ^ [List of 2013 nominees http://www.grammy.com/nominees]
  33. ^ Brown, August (January 29, 2010). "Buju Banton's Grammy nomination angers gay rights groups". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  34. ^ Furse, Jane H. (December 14, 2009). "Grammy-nominated Jamaican reggae star Buju Banton faces 20 years after 11-pound cocaine bust". Daily News (New York City, New York: Mortimer Zuckerman). Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  35. ^ "Grammy Doesn't Honor Buju Banton". The Advocate (Here Media). January 31, 2010. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  36. ^ "Beenie Man concerts cancelled over anti-gay lyrics". CBC News. August 27, 2004. Retrieved January 17, 2011. [dead link]
  37. ^ Adebayo, Dotun (October 18, 2002). "Don't blame the music". The Guardian (London: Guardian Media Group). Retrieved January 17, 2011. 

External links[edit]