Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance

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Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality vocal performances in the rock music genre
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1988
Last awarded 2011
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance was an award presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality vocal performances in the rock music genre. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo, the award was first presented to Bruce Springsteen in 1988 for the album Tunnel of Love. Since then, the award was presented in 1992 and 1994, and has been awarded each year since 2005. Beginning with the 2005 ceremony, the name of the award was changed to Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance. For these years, the award combined and replaced the gender-specific awards for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance and Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. This fusion has been criticized, especially when females are not nominated under the solo category.[3][4] The Academy has cited a lack of eligible recordings in the female rock category as the reason for the mergers.[5]

As of 2011, Springsteen holds the record for the most wins in this category, with five (he has also received three awards for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance).[6] No other performing artists have received the award more than once. American artists have been presented with the award more than any other nationality, though it has been presented to a musician from the United Kingdom once. Neil Young holds the record for the most nominations without a win, with four.

The award will be discontinued from 2012 in a major overhaul of Grammy categories. From 2012, all solo or duo/group performances in the rock category will be shifted to the newly formed Best Rock Performance category.[7]

Recipients[edit]

Black and white image of a man holding a guitar, wearing a dark vest and a cross hanging from a necklace
Five-time award winner Bruce Springsteen, performing in 1988
A woman with curly red hair wearing a sparkling jacket and holding three gold trophies.
1992 award winner Bonnie Raitt at the 32nd Grammy Awards
A man behind a keyboard and microphone stand, wearing a cowboy hat, sunglasses, a white dress shirt, and white pants.
2007 award winner Bob Dylan, performing in 2006
A man with his eyes closed, holding a guitar and standing behind a microphone. Behind him is a man with a goatee, sitting behind a keyboard.
2009 award winner John Mayer, performing at the Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2007
Year[I] Performing artist Nationality Work Nominees Ref.
1988 Springsteen, BruceBruce Springsteen  United States Tunnel of Love [8]
19891991[II] N/A N/A N/A N/A [9]
[10]
[11]
1992 Raitt, BonnieBonnie Raitt  United States Luck of the Draw [12]
1993[II] N/A N/A N/A N/A [13]
1994 Meat Loaf  United States "I'd Do Anything for Love (But I Won't Do That)" [14]
19952004[II] N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2005 Springsteen, BruceBruce Springsteen  United States "Code of Silence" [15]
2006 Springsteen, BruceBruce Springsteen  United States "Devils & Dust" [16]
2007 Dylan, BobBob Dylan  United States "Someday Baby" [17]
2008 Springsteen, BruceBruce Springsteen  United States "Radio Nowhere" [18]
2009 Mayer, JohnJohn Mayer  United States "Gravity" [19]
2010 Springsteen, BruceBruce Springsteen  United States "Working on a Dream" [20]
2011 McCartney, PaulPaul McCartney  United Kingdom "Helter Skelter" [21]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] Award was separated into the gender-specific awards for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male and Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  3. ^ Rodman, Sarah (February 8, 2009). "All my rocking ladies, don't bother putting your hands up". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  4. ^ Strauss, Neil (January 6, 1995). "'94 Grammy Nominations: Not Just the Familiar". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  5. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 15, 1988). "U2, Jackson Top Grammy Nominees: Simon, Winwood Seek Reprise of '87 Wins". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. p. 2. Retrieved April 26, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Grammy Awards: Best Rock Vocal Performance – Male". Rock on the Net. Retrieved January 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Explanation For Category Restructuring". GRAMMY.org. Retrieved 2011-11-05. 
  8. ^ McShane, Larry (January 15, 1988). "Irish rockers among Grammy nominees". The Telegraph (Nashua, New Hampshire: Telegraph Publishing Company). Retrieved June 8, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". Times-News (Hendersonville, North Carolina: The New York Times Company). January 13, 1989. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Here's list of nominees from all 77 categories". Deseret News (Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News Publishing Company). January 12, 1990. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  11. ^ "List of Grammy Award nominations". Times-News (Hendersonville, North Carolina: The New York Times Company). January 11, 1991. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Nominees announced for Grammy Awards". TimesDaily (Florence, Alabama: Tennessee Valley Printing). January 8, 1992. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  13. ^ "Grammy nominees". The Baltimore Sun (Tribune Company). January 8, 1993. p. 1. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  14. ^ Campbell, Mary (January 7, 1994). "Sting, Joel top Grammy nominations". Star-News (Wilmington, North Carolina: The New York Times Company). Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Kanye West is at top of Grammy list". The Seattle Times (The Seattle Times Company). December 8, 2004. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  16. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 12, 2005. p. 1. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Grammys 2007: The Nominees". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc). December 7, 2006. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  18. ^ Leeds, Jeff (December 7, 2007). "Kanye West and Amy Winehouse lead Grammy nominees". Cape Cod Times (News Corporation). Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  19. ^ "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  20. ^ "The 52nd Annual Grammy Awards Nominees List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 9, 2010. 
  21. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved December 2, 2010. 

External links[edit]