Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album

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Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality traditional world music albums
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 2004
Last awarded 2011
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Traditional World Music Album was an honor presented to recording artists between 2004 and 2011 for quality traditional world music albums. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

The Grammy Award for Best World Music Album was first presented at the 34th Grammy Awards in 1992. The category remained unchanged until 2004, when it was split into separate awards for Best Traditional World Music Album and Best Contemporary World Music Album. The first award for Best Traditional World Music Album was presented to the Sherab Ling Monastery at the 46th Grammy Awards for the album ''Sacred Tibetan Chant. In 2011, a major overhaul of the Grammy categories resulted in the merge of the two awards to a single Best World Music Album category beginning in 2012.

Recipients[edit]

For the 46th Grammy Awards (2004), Best Traditional World Music Album nominees included Ecos de Borinquen for Jibaro Hasta El Hueso: Mountain Music of Puerto Rico, Ghazal for The Rain, Grupo de Capoeira Angola Pelourinho for Capoeira Angola 2: Brincando Na Roda, Kasse Mady Diabate for Kassi Kasse, Masters of Persian Music for Without You, and the Monks of Sherab Ling Monastery for Sacred Tibetan Chant.[3] Awards were presented to the monks of Sherab Ling Monastery and Jon Mark as the producer and engineer of the album.

Members of the two-time award-winning group Ladysmith Black Mambazo performing in 2006

2005 nominees included El Grupo Cimarron for Si, Soy Llanero: Joropo Music from the Orinoco Plains of Colombia, Ladysmith Black Mambazo for Raise Your Spirit Higher, Sandra Luna for Tango Varon, Pero Negro for Jolgorio, and the compilation album Abayudaya: Music from the Jewish People of Uganda by various artists.[4] The award was presented to Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

Nominees for the 48th Grammy Awards in 2006 included Mamadou Diabaté for Behmanka, Los Pleneros de la 21 for Para Todos Ustedes, Masters of Persian Music for Faryad, Lama Tashi for Tibetan Master Chants, and Ali Farka Touré and Toumani Diabaté for In the Heart of the Moon.[5] Awards were presented to Ali Farka Touré and Toumani Diabaté.

For the 49th Grammy Awards (2007), the nominees were the Academy of Maqâm for Music of Central Asia, Vol. 2: Invisible Face of the Beloved: Classical Music of the Tajiks and Uzbeks, Hossein Alizadeh and Djivan Gasparyan for Endless Vision, Andrea Hoag, Loretta Kelley and Charlie Pilzer for Hambo in the Snow, Aashish Khan and Zakir Hussain for Golden Strings of the Sarode, and the Soweto Gospel Choir for Blessed.[6] The Soweto Gospel Choir earned the award for Best Traditional World Music Album.

Nominees for the 50th Grammy Awards (2008) included Rahim AlHaj with Souhail Kaspar for When The Soul Is Settled: Music of Iraq, Cheick Hamala Diabaté and Bob Carlin for From Mali to America, Konono Nº1 for Live at Couleur Café, the Soweto Gospel Choir for African Spirit, and the compilation album Singing for Life: Songs of Hope, Healing, and HIV/AIDS in Uganda by various artists.[7] The award was presented to the Soweto Gospel Choir for the second consecutive year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved June 12, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Complete list of Grammy Award nominations". East Valley Tribune. December 4, 2003. Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 7, 2004. p. 8. Retrieved July 11, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 9, 2005. p. 8. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees". San Francisco Chronicle. December 8, 2006. p. 8. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 
  7. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominees". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 6, 2007. p. 3. Retrieved July 12, 2011. 

External links[edit]