Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Classical

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Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Classical
A gold gramophone trophy with a plaque set on a table
Gilded gramophone trophy presented to Grammy Award winners
Awarded for quality classical music production
Country United States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded 1980
Last awarded 2014
Official website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Classical is an honor presented to record producers for quality classical music productions at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards.[1] Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Originally known as the Grammy Award for Classical Producer of the Year, the award was first presented to James Mallinson at the 22nd Grammy Awards (1980). The name remained unchanged until 1998, when the category became known as Producer of the Year, Classical. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to album producers "whose recordings, released for the first time during the eligibility year, represent consistently outstanding creativity in the production of classical recordings".[3] Producers must have produced at least 51% playing time on three separately released recordings (only one of which can be an opera released in DVD format). Producers may submit content as a team only if they worked together exclusively during the period of eligibility.[3] Anthony Tommasini, music critic for The New York Times, asserted that "In the struggling field of classical recording, it's the producers who take the real risks and make things happen."[4] The honor is presented alongside the award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical.

As of 2012, Steven Epstein and Robert Woods share the record of the most wins, with seven each. David Frost, James Mallinson and Judith Sherman have been presented the award three times each. Two-time recipients include Joanna Nickrenz (once alongside Marc Aubort). Woods' wife, Elaine Martone, received the honor in 2007.[5] David Frost is the son of Thomas Frost,[6] who received an award in the same category in 1987.

Recipients[edit]

Year[I] Producer(s) Nationality Nominees Ref.
1980 Mallinson, JamesJames Mallinson
1981 Woods, RobertRobert Woods [7]
1982 Mallinson, JamesJames Mallinson
1983 Woods, RobertRobert Woods
1984 Aubort, MarcMarc Aubort and Joanna Nickrenz
1985 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States
1986 Woods, RobertRobert Woods
1987 Frost, ThomasThomas Frost
1988 Woods, RobertRobert Woods
1989 Woods, RobertRobert Woods
1990 Woods, RobertRobert Woods
  • Wolf Erichson
  • Michael Haas
  • Patti Laursen
  • Elizabeth Ostrow
[8]
1991 Stern, AdamAdam Stern  United States
1992 Mallinson, JamesJames Mallinson
1993 Fine, MichaelMichael Fine [9]
1994 Sherman, JudithJudith Sherman
1995 Cornall, AndrewAndrew Cornall [10]
1996 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [11]
1997 Nickrenz, JoannaJoanna Nickrenz [12]
1998 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [13]
1999 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [14]
2000 Abeshouse, AdamAdam Abeshouse
  • Andrew Keener
  • Marina A. Ledin and Victor Ledin
  • James Mallinson
  • Robina G. Young
[15]
2001 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [16]
2002 Eicher, ManfredManfred Eicher  Germany [17]
2003 Woods, RobertRobert Woods [18]
2004 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [19]
2005 Frost, DavidDavid Frost [20]
2006 Handley, TimTim Handley [21]
2007 Martone, ElaineElaine Martone [22]
2008 Sherman, JudithJudith Sherman
  • Blanton Alspaugh
  • John Fraser
  • Marina A. Ledin and Victor Ledin
  • Robina G. Young
[23]
2009 Frost, DavidDavid Frost [24]
2010 Epstein, StevenSteven Epstein  United States [25]
2011 Frost, DavidDavid Frost  United States [26]
2012 Judith Sherman -
2013 Blanton Alspaugh - [27]
2014 David Frost  United States

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "52nd OEP Category Description Guide" (PDF). National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. p. 8. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  4. ^ Tommasini, Anthony (February 23, 2003). "Music: The Grammys/Classical; Fewer Records, More Attention". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Chillis, Gnarls, Dixies win early awards". The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: Fairfax Media). February 12, 2007. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  6. ^ Tsioulcas, Anastasia (March 12, 2005). "America's Choir Conquers The Charts". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 117 (11). Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Here's complete list of the Grammy nominees". Eugene Register-Guard (121) (Eugene, Oregon: Guard Publishing). February 21, 1981. p. 36. Retrieved February 4, 2011. 
  8. ^ Macdonald, Patrick (January 12, 1990). "Soundgarden Nomination: The Growth Of Local Rock". The Seattle Times (The Seattle Times Company). Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  9. ^ "The 35th Grammy Awards Nominations: General Categories". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 8, 1993. p. 13. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  10. ^ "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 6, 1995. p. 12. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  11. ^ "List of Grammy nominees". CNN. January 4, 1996. Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  12. ^ "The Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 8, 1997. p. 11. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  13. ^ Moon, Tom (January 7, 1998). "Grammys: A Familiar Face, A Few Surprises Babyface Leads In Nominations For A Second Year.". The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia Media Holdings). Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Academy's Complete List of Nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 6, 1999. p. 11. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Final Nominations List". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Gannett Company). Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  16. ^ Boucher, Geoff (January 4, 2001). "Grammys Cast a Wider Net Than Usual". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 13. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 10. Retrieved February 1, 2011. [dead link]
  19. ^ "Grammy Award Winners". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 8, 2003. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Fast Facts: List of Grammy Nominees". Fox News Channel. February 13, 2005. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  21. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). December 8, 2005. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  22. ^ "FOX Facts: Complete List of Grammy Award Nominations". Fox News Channel. December 7, 2006. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Complete Grammy nominations list". Daily News (New York City, New York: Mortimer Zuckerman). December 6, 2007. Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Complete List of Nominees for the 51st Annual Grammy Awards". E!. December 3, 2008. Retrieved February 1, 2011. 
  25. ^ Lustig, Jay (December 2, 2009). "Nominees list for 2010 Grammys". The Star-Ledger (Advance Publications). Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  26. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  27. ^ List of nominees 2013

External links[edit]