Grammy Awards and nominations for Whitney Houston

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Whitney Houston is one of the most successful female singers of all time. Her accomplishments have been recognized with six competitive Grammy Awards, and one Grammy Hall of Fame Award, giving her a total of 7 Grammy Awards. Though she has been nominated twenty-six times and for two times songs performed by her were nominated for Song of the Year. She earned her first Grammy, Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female in 1986, and was honored with two general field Grammys: Album of the Year for The Bodyguard Soundtrack and Record of the Year for "I Will Always Love You" at its 36th ceremonies in 1994. Below is a list of awards for which she has been nominated and those that she won (the winner in each category has ★ mark).

1986[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
28th
[1][2][3]
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female

Madonna - "Crazy for You"
Linda Ronstadt - Lush Life (Album)
Whitney Houston - "Saving All My Love for You" ★
Pat Benatar - "We Belong"
Tina Turner - "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)"

Won
Album of the Year Dire Straits - Brothers in Arms
Sting - The Dream of the Blue Turtles
Phil Collins - No Jacket Required
USA For Africa - We Are the World/The Album
Whitney Houston - Whitney Houston
Nominated
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Aretha Franklin - "Freeway of Love" ★
Chaka Khan - I Feel for You (Album)
Teena Marie - "Lovergirl"
Patti LaBelle - "New Attitude"
Whitney Houston - "You Give Good Love"
Nominated

1987[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
29th
[4]
Record of the Year

Whitney Houston - "Greatest Love of All"
Robert Palmer - "Addicted to Love"
Steve Winwood - "Higher Love" ★
Peter Gabriel - "Sledgehammer"
Dionne Warwick and Friends - "That's What Friends Are For"

Nominated

1988[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
30th
[5][6]
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female

Carly Simon - Coming Around Again (Album)
Belinda Carlisle - "Heaven Is a Place on Earth"
Whitney Houston - "I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)" ★
Suzanne Vega - "Luka"
Barbra Streisand - One Voice (Album)

Won
  • Anita Baker and Robbie Robertson presented to Houston with Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female award, Houston's second Grammy.
  • "Didn't We Almost Have It All," written by Michael Masser and Will Jennings and performed by Houston, was nominated for Song of the Year, goes to the songwriter(s), but the award went to "Somewhere Out There," written by James Horner, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil.
  • Houston kicked off the broadcast by performing "I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)" along with her tour band and dancers. During the performance, she changed her clothes backstage while the announcer called the names that made appearance on the ceremony.
  • During the finale performance of the ceremony, "Runaround Sue" by Dion, Houston enjoyed his performance on the stage along with other cast of the show.
Album of the Year

Michael Jackson - Bad
U2 - The Joshua Tree
Prince - Sign ‘O' the Times
Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris - Trio
Whitney Houston - Whitney

Nominated
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female

Aretha Franklin - Aretha (Album) ★
Natalie Cole - Everlasting (Album)
Whitney Houston - "For the Love of You"
Jody Watley - "Looking for a New Love"
Nancy Wilson - "Forbidden Lover"

Nominated

1989[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
31st
[7][8]
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female Joni Mitchell - Chalk Mark in a Rain Storm (Album)
Tracy Chapman - "Fast Car" ★
Brenda Russell - Get Here (Album)
Whitney Houston - "One Moment in Time"
Taylor Dayne - "Tell It to My Heart"
Nominated
  • The telecast of the ceremony started with Houston's gospel-charged performance of "One Moment in Time," got a standing ovation.

1990[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
32nd
[9]
Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal Soul II Soul - "Back to Life (However Do You Want Me)" ★
BeBe & CeCe Winans - "Celebrate New Life"
Aretha Franklin and James Brown - "Gimme Your Love"
Aretha Franklin and Whitney Houston - "It Isn't, It Wasn't, It Ain't Never Gonna Be"
Deniece Williams and Natalie Cole - "We Sing Praises"
Nominated
  • "It Isn't, It Wasn't, It Ain't Never Gonna Be" was the second single from Aretha's 1989 studio album Through the Storm.

1991[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
33rd
[10][11]
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female

Lisa Stansfield - "All Around the World"
Bette Midler - "From a Distance"
Whitney Houston - "I'm Your Baby Tonight"
Sinéad O'Connor - "Nothing Compares 2 U"
Mariah Carey - "Vision of Love" ★

Nominated
  • Because the single of "I'm Your Baby Tonight" was released on September 28, 1990 in the United States, it could barely meet the then Grammy eligibility period ended September 30 (now, August 31).

1992[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
34th
[12][13]
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female Whitney Houston - "All the Man That I Need"
Amy Grant - "Baby Baby"
Mariah Carey - Emotions (Album)
Oleta Adams - "Get Here"
Bonnie Raitt - "Something to Talk About" ★
Nominated

1993[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
35th
[14]
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Oleta Adams - "Don't Let the Sun Go Down on Me"
Whitney Houston - "I Belong to You"
Chaka Khan - The Woman I Am (Album) ★
Shanice - "I Love Your Smile"
Vanessa Williams - "The Comfort Zone"
Nominated
  • It was Houston's third nomination in that category. The award was presented in the pre-telecast ceremony.

1994[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
36th
[15][16][17]
Album of the Year Donald Fagen - Kamakiriad
Whitney Houston - The Bodyguard Original Soundtrack Album
Billy Joel - River of Dreams
R.E.M. - Automatic for the People
Sting - Ten Summoner's Tales
Won
  • Houston was honored with "Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female" award, presented by Dolly Parton and David Foster, who is the "I Will Always Love You" songwriter and the producer, respectively. It was her third won in the category and made her the second most winning artist behind Ella Fitzgerald and Barbra Streisand with 5 wins each.
  • Record of the Year, goes to the performing artist and the producer, was presented to Houston and Foster by B.B. King and Steve Winwood. It was her first win in the General Field.
  • Houston also earned the Album of the Year award, presented by Bonnie Raitt and Lena Horne, along with the producers of the album: Foster, Narada Michael Walden, L.A. Reid, Babyface, David Cole and Robert Clivilles.
  • In addition, "I Have Nothing" and "Run to You," two other songs sung by Houston, were among nominees for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television, presented to the songwriter(s).
  • Right after winning an award, she admitted to reporters that she had to be persuaded to even record the song "I Will Always Love You" in the first place. "I kept saying, 'But it's a country song.' Then I found myself singing it and loving it," she explained backstage.
  • Houston opened the show with a performance of "I Will Always Love You."
  • The winner of Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, Toni Braxton, told reporters that "I can't believe I beat these singers. I mean, Whitney is my favorite."
Record of the Year Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle - "A Whole New World" (Aladdin's Theme)
Whitney Houston - "I Will Always Love You" ★
Billy Joel - "The River of Dreams"
Sting - "If I Ever Lose My Faith in You"
Neil Young - "Harvest Moon"
Won
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female Mariah Carey - "Dreamlover"
Shawn Colvin - "I Don't Know Why"
Whitney Houston - "I Will Always Love You" ★
k.d. lang - "Miss Chatelaine"
Tina Turner - "I Don't Wanna Fight"
Won
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Aretha Franklin - "Someday We'll All Be Free"
Whitney Houston - "I'm Every Woman"
Janet Jackson - "That's the Way Love Goes"
Patti LaBelle - "All Right Now (Live)"
Toni Braxton - "Another Sad Love Song" ★
Nominated

1997[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
39th
[18]
Album of the Year Beck - Odelay
Celine Dion - Falling Into You
The Fugees - The Score
The Smashing Pumpkins - Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
Various Artists - Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album
Nominated
  • "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)," written by Babyface and performed by Houston, got nomination for Song of the Year, and was named Best R&B Song.
  • Houston was first nominated as the songwriter for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television for "Count on Me."
  • A medley performance of the songs from Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack was one of the highlights in that year's ceremony. The medley performance was started by Brandy with "Sittin' Up in My Room" and followed by Mary J. Blige with "Not Gon' Cry." And then Whitney Houston sang "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)", and "Count on Me" with CeCe Winans. Later all-stars, Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan, Mary J. Blige and Brandy, joined in medley's finale, receiving a standing ovation.
Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals Burt Bacharach and Elvis Costello - "God Give Me Strength"
Brandy, Tamia, Gladys Knight and Chaka Khan - "Missing You"
Natalie Cole with Nat King Cole - "When I Fall In Love" ★
Whitney Houston and CeCe Winans - "Count on Me"
Frank Sinatra and Luciano Pavarotti - "My Way"
Sting, John McLaughlin, Dominic Miller and Vinnie Colaiuta - "The Wind Cries Mary"
Nominated
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Mary J. Blige - "Not Gon' Cry"
Brandy - "Sittin' Up in My Room"
Toni Braxton - "You're Makin' Me High" ★
Whitney Houston - "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"
Tamia - "You Put a Move on My Heart"
Nominated
Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television "Because You Loved Me" - Diane Warren
"Count on Me" - Babyface, Michael Houston and Whitney Houston
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" - Babyface
"It Hurts Like Hell" - Babyface
"Moonlight" - Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman and John Williams
Nominated

1998[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
40th
[19][20]
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Erykah Badu - "On & On" ★
Mariah Carey - "Honey"
Whitney Houston - "I Believe in You And Me"
Chaka Khan - "Summertime"
Patti LaBelle - "When You Talk About Love"
Nominated
  • Houston snubbed the ceremony in that year because The Preacher's Wife Soundtrack was nominated in the R&B category instead of in the gospel category. Houston told Entertainment Tonight that "Basically, it was my gospel album, and it was excluded from the gospel category altogether. I'm not going this year. I'm sick of work being done and people not recognizing it."
Best R&B Album Babyface - The Day
Erykah Badu - Baduizm
Mary J. Blige - Share My World
Boyz II Men - Evolution
Whitney Houston - The Preacher's Wife Soundtrack Album
Patti LaBelle - Flame
Nominated

2000[edit]

Ceremony Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
42nd
[21][22][23][24][25]
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female Mary J. Blige - "All That I Can Say"
Brandy - "Almost Doesn't Count"
Macy Gray - "Do Something"
Lauryn Hill - "Everything Is Everything"
Whitney Houston - "It's Not Right But It's Okay" ★
Won
  • Jamie Foxx, Busta Rhymes and Jane Krakowski handed the Grammy for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance award to Houston, her sixth career Grammy and her first won in that category, had already been nominated six times.
  • "Heartbreak Hotel" and "It's Not Right But It's Okay" were both nominated Best R&B Song, given to the songwriter, but lost to "No Scrubs" performed by TLC. In addition, "When You Believe" was among the nominess for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media.
  • In that year's ceremony, there was bad blood between Houston and Rosie O'Donnell, the host for the show. When Rosie shouted "Aloha" to Houston in her opening monologue that took aim at various stars' run-ins with the law―an obvious reference to Houston's alleged marijuana bust at the Honolulu airport earlier that year―she got a raised hand (little short of one upraised finger) from Houston. In addition, Rosie introduced Houston's performance of "It's Not Right But It's Okay" and "I Learned from the Best," calling Houston 'a huge fan of the Doobies.'
Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal Eric Benet featuring Tamia - "Spend My Life with You"
Mary J. Blige and Aretha Franklin - "Don't Waste Your Time"
Destiny's Child - "Bills, Bills, Bills"
Whitney Houston featuring Faith Evans & Kelly Price - "Heartbreak Hotel"
TLC - "No Scrubs" ★
Nominated
Best R&B Album Mary J. Blige - Mary
Whitney Houston - My Love Is Your Love
R. Kelly - R.
Brian McKnight - Back At One
TLC - FanMail
Nominated
Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals Andrea Bocelli and Celine Dion - "The Prayer"
Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey - "When You Believe"
'N Sync and Gloria Estefan - "Music of My Heart"
Santana featuring Dave Matthews - "Love of My Life"
Santana featuring Rob Thomas - "Smooth" ★
Nominated

2013[edit]

Categories Nominations Results Note(s)
Grammy Hall of Fame Award (Special Award) Whitney Houston - Whitney Houston Won
  • It was Houston's first Grammy Hall of Fame Award.

Performances and appearances on the Grammy Awards[edit]

Date City Venue Performance/Note(s)
February 25, 1986
(28th)
Los Angeles Shrine Auditorium
  • "Saving All My Love for You"
February 24, 1987
(29th)
March 2, 1988
(30th)
New York City Radio City Music Hall
  • "I Wanna Dance With Somebody (Who Loves Me)" (opening)
February 22, 1989
(31st)
Los Angeles Shrine Auditorium
  • "One Moment in Time" (opening)
March 1, 1994
(36th)
New York City Radio City Music Hall
  • "I Will Always Love You" (opening)
February 28, 1996
(38th)
Los Angeles Shrine Auditorium
  • Houston was not nominated in any category in that year, but attended on the ceremony to perform and present an award in the gospel categories. After she gave a talk on her musical roots, the gospel, introduced CeCe Winans' performance, the first part of a gospel medley, in which herself also took part as a performer. After the performance, drew a standing ovation, Houston presented to Winans with the Best Contemporary Soul Gospel Album award.
  • Gospel medley:
February 26, 1997
(39th)
New York City Madison Square Garden
  • Waiting To Exhale Soundtrack medley:
    • "Sittin' Up in My Room" (performed by Brandy)
    • "Not Gon' Cry" (performd by Mary J. Blige)
    • "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"
    • "Count on Me" (duet with CeCe Winans, later joined by Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan, Mary J. Blige and Brandy)
February 24, 1999
(41st)
Los Angeles Shrine Auditorium
February 23, 2000
(42nd)
Staples Center
  • "It's Not Right But It's Okay" and "I Learned from the Best"
February 8, 2009
(51st)
  • Houston made a surprise appearance to present Jennifer Hudson with the Grammy Award for Best R&B Album.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "28th Annual Grammy Awards Final Nominations". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 97 (4): 78. January 26, 1986. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  2. ^ Hilburn, Robert (February 26, 1986). "28th Annual Grammys A 'World'-class Event". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 1. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ "NARAS to Clive: We Stand Pat, Whitney's Not a New Artist". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 98 (4): 74. January 25, 1986. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  4. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 9, 1987). "Grammy Nominations: Highs and Lows: Winwood, Gabriel and Simon Garner Most Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 2. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  5. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 15, 1988). "U2, Jackson Top Grammy Nominees: Simon, Winwood Seek Reprise of '87 Wins". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 2. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  6. ^ Hilburn, Robert (March 3, 1988). "U2, Paul Simon Winners of Major Grammy Awards". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 2. Retrieved November 6, 2011. 
  7. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 13, 1989). "Chapman, McFerrin Lead Grammy Race : Baker, Sting, Michael, Winwood Also Capture Mutliple Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 2. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  8. ^ Pareles, Jon (February 23, 1989). "Grammys to McFerrin and Chapman". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  9. ^ Hunt, Dennis; Cromelin, Richard (January 12, 1990). "The Grammys, Round 1 : Pop Music: Rock 'n' roll veterans lead pack of recording industry awards nominees". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). p. 2. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  10. ^ "List of 33rd Grammy Award Nominations". The Times-News, Handersonville (The New York Times Company). January 12, 1991. p. 19. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Jones, Hammer, Jackson Top Grammy Nominees". Jet (Johnson Publishing Company) 79 (15): 56. January 28, 1991. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  12. ^ "The 34th Annual Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles (Tribune Company). January 9, 1992. p. 1. Retrieved November 11, 2011. 
  13. ^ Andrew Bedell (February 22, 1992). "Television: 34th Grammt awards are set for Tuesday". The Dispatch (The New York Times Regional Media Group). Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  14. ^ "The 35th Grammy Awards Nominations : General Categories". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). January 8, 1993. p. 2. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  15. ^ Steve Hochman (January 7, 1994). "The 36th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  16. ^ Melinda Newman (January 15, 1994). "Sting's 'Tales' Heads Grammy Class". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 106 (3): 8, 75. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Music: Black Stars Win Big at Grammys". Jet (Johnson Publishing Company) 85 (20): 16–17. March 21, 1994. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved November 7, 2011. 
  18. ^ "39th Annual Grammy Awards: Final Nominations". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 109 (3): 84–85. January 18, 1997. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 9, 2011. 
  19. ^ "40th Annual Grammy Awards: Final Nominations". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 110 (3): 78–79. January 17, 1998. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Whitney's Blues". Jet (Johnson Publishing Company) 93 (14): 48. March 2, 1998. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Final Nominations For The 42nd Annual Grammy Awards". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 112 (3): 72–73. January 15, 2000. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  22. ^ "Billboard Goes To The Grammys: And The Grammy Winners Are...". Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc.) 112 (10): 20. March 4, 2000. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  23. ^ Larry Nager (February 24, 2000). "'Smooth' grabs Grammy for local native". The Cincinnati Enquirer (Gannett Company). Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  24. ^ Paul Brownfield (February 24, 2000). "The Grammys 2000: At Least There Was Jennifer Lopez's Dress". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved November 8, 2011. 
  25. ^ "The Grammy Gossip: Rosie, Whitney, Christina and other backstage intrigue". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Block Communications). February 25, 2000. p. 30. Retrieved November 8, 2011.