Granby, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Granby, Missouri
City
Location of Granby, Missouri
Location of Granby, Missouri
Coordinates: 36°55′9″N 94°15′19″W / 36.91917°N 94.25528°W / 36.91917; -94.25528Coordinates: 36°55′9″N 94°15′19″W / 36.91917°N 94.25528°W / 36.91917; -94.25528
Country United States
State Missouri
County Newton
Area[1]
 • Total 4.43 sq mi (11.47 km2)
 • Land 4.42 sq mi (11.45 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 1,125 ft (343 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 2,134
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 2,161
 • Density 482.8/sq mi (186.4/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64844
Area code(s) 417
FIPS code 29-28108[4]
GNIS feature ID 0718664[5]

Granby is a city in Newton County, Missouri, United States. The population was 2,134 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Joplin, Missouri Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

Granby is located at 36°55′9″N 94°15′19″W / 36.91917°N 94.25528°W / 36.91917; -94.25528.[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.43 square miles (11.47 km2), of which, 4.42 square miles (11.45 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Granby is noted as being the "Oldest Mining Town in the Southwest". There are many chat piles scattered about Granby today as evidence of the boom of lead and zinc mining as part of the Tri-State district back in the early 20th century.

History[edit]

In the early 19th century, after the United States bought the land as part of the Louisiana Purchase, homesteading was the main reason to move there. Among the American settlers who came was a man named Madison Vickery. According to official history, Vickery discovered lead while digging for water. News of Vickery's strike, around 1850, spread quickly. The resulting flood of prospectors was so wild the time came to be known as the Granby Stampede. By 1855, the population swelled to 8,000. The town that sprang up was named after Granby, Massachusetts.[7]

By 1859, over 25 million tons of lead had been shipped from Granby mines. Granby had the largest lead mining and smelting operations in the state and was one of the most important lead resources in the country. During the civil war, both North and South came to Granby for ammunition. Granby lead flew both ways during the Civil War. In October 1862, the Battle of Granby finally established Union control of the mines, though the smelter was destroyed in the fighting. After the war, mining resumed with a fury, aided by new technology and improved rail transportation. In 1868, Granby's petition for incorporation was accepted by the state and in 1875 the city of Granby was officially chartered. The mines thrived through the first and second World Wars, but then the payable ore deposits began to run out.

At the turn of the 20th century, Granby contained a smelter and a gristmill.[8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,400
1900 2,315 65.4%
1910 2,442 5.5%
1920 1,736 −28.9%
1930 1,445 −16.8%
1940 1,455 0.7%
1950 1,670 14.8%
1960 1,808 8.3%
1970 1,678 −7.2%
1980 1,908 13.7%
1990 1,945 1.9%
2000 2,121 9.0%
2010 2,134 0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census


Granby contains two cemeteries, the Granby Memorial Cemetery and a more antiquitated cemetery often referred to as the "Old Granby Cemetery."

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,134 people, 821 households, and 573 families residing in the city. The population density was 482.8 inhabitants per square mile (186.4 /km2). There were 940 housing units at an average density of 212.7 per square mile (82.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.5% White, 0.3% African American, 2.8% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population.

There were 821 households of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.0% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.2% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the city was 36 years. 28% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.2% were from 25 to 44; 24.4% were from 45 to 64; and 15.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.8% male and 51.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 2,121 people, 850 households, and 589 families residing in the city. The population density was 478.1 people per square mile (184.4/km²). There were 934 housing units at an average density of 210.5 per square mile (81.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.57% White, 2.03% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 1.60% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.94% of the population.

There were 850 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 27.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the city the population was spread out with 65.6% under the age of 18, 9.8% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 88.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $28,625, and the median income for a family was $32,455. Males had a median income of $26,515 versus $18,208 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,371. About 13.0% of families and 16.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.9% of those under age 18 and 17.3% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Granby". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-05-03. 
  7. ^ Ramsay, Robert L. (1952). Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names. University of Missouri Press. p. 26. 
  8. ^ Williams, Walter (1904). The State of Missouri. p. 461. 

External links[edit]