Grant-Hadley Enterprises

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Grant-Hadley Enterprises was the first of three names used by an American small press publishing house specializing in science fiction titles. The company was founded in 1945 by Donald M. Grant and Thomas G. Hadley and published one title as Grant-Hadley Enterprises. Kenneth J. Krueger joined the company in 1946 and the name was changed to The Buffalo Book Company. Later in 1946, Hadley continued the company on his own as The Hadley Publishing Co.

Grant-Hadley Enterprises[edit]

Donald M. Grant first met Thomas G. Hadley at Dana's Old Corner Bookstore in Providence, Rhode Island in 1945.[1] The bookstore had recently acquired the library of fellow Providence native, H. P. Lovecraft, from his estate. Grant and Hadley wanted to see if there was anything of interest. In the course of the chance meeting, they struck up a conversation about Lovecraft and decided that there should be a volume of memoirs by Providence natives who had known Lovecraft. They ended up publishing Rhode Island on Lovecraft which was successful enough to warrant a second edition.[2]

Works published by Grant-Hadley Enterprises[edit]

  • Rhode Island on Lovecraft, edited by Donald M. Grant and Thomas G. Hadley (1945)

The Buffalo Book Company[edit]

Kenneth J. Krueger, a science fiction fan and book seller from Buffalo, New York, was drafted in 1945 and eventually stationed near Providence.[3] Krueger joined the venture bringing with him a mailing list from his book selling business. At this point, Donald Grant had also entered the military[1] and was stationed in Texas.[3] Krueger talked Tom Hadley into changing the name of the publisher to The Buffalo Book Company.[1] The first book published by The Buffalo Book Company was The Time Stream, by John Taine. The book did not sell well[3] which delayed their second publication of The Skylark of Space by E. E. Smith.

Works published by The Buffalo Book Company[edit]

  • The Time Stream, by John Taine (1946)
  • The Skylark of Space by E. E. Smith (1946)

The Hadley Publishing Co.[edit]

Lloyd Arthur Eshbach ordered a copy of Skylark of Space from The Buffalo Book Company, in 1945 or 1946.[4] Frustrated by the publishing delays, Eshbach wrote to the Buffalo Book Company offering suggestions as to how they could better market their books. Thus started a correspondence between Eshbach and Tom Hadley with Eshbach continuing to offer advice. At this point Ken Krueger had moved back to Buffalo and Don Grant was attending college, though he continued to offer recommendations on what to publish.[5] Hadley decided to continue the company on his own, renaming it The Hadley Publishing Co.

Works published by The Hadley Publishing Co.[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Eshbach, Lloyd Arthur (1983). Over My Shoulder: Reflections on a Science Fiction Era. Philadelphia: Oswald Train. pp. 163–179. OCLC 10489084. 
  2. ^ Chalker, Jack L.; Mark Owings (1998). The Science-Fantasy Publishers: A Bibliographic History, 1923-1998. Westminster, MD and Baltimore: Mirage Press, Ltd. p. 822. 
  3. ^ a b c Chalker, Jack L.; Mark Owings (1998). The Science-Fantasy Publishers: A Bibliographic History, 1923-1998. Westminster, MD and Baltimore: Mirage Press, Ltd. pp. 123–125. 
  4. ^ Eshbach, Lloyd Arthur (1983). Over My Shoulder: Reflections on a Science Fiction Era. Philadelphia: Oswald Train. pp. 109–138. OCLC 10489084. 
  5. ^ a b Chalker, Jack L.; Mark Owings (1998). The Science-Fantasy Publishers: A Bibliographic History, 1923-1998. Westminster, MD and Baltimore: Mirage Press, Ltd. pp. 342–343.