Granville, Ohio

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Granville, Ohio
Village
Motto: "One of Ohio's Best Hometowns"
Location of Granville, Ohio
Location of Granville, Ohio
Location within Licking County
Location within Licking County
Coordinates: 40°4′3″N 82°30′44″W / 40.06750°N 82.51222°W / 40.06750; -82.51222Coordinates: 40°4′3″N 82°30′44″W / 40.06750°N 82.51222°W / 40.06750; -82.51222
Country United States
State Ohio
County Licking
Area[1]
 • Total 4.71 sq mi (12.20 km2)
 • Land 4.68 sq mi (12.12 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation[2] 961 ft (293 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 5,646
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 5,638
 • Density 1,206.4/sq mi (465.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43023
Area code(s) 740
FIPS code 39-31402[5]
GNIS feature ID 1061369[2]

Granville is a village in Licking County, Ohio, United States, founded by settlers from Granville, Massachusetts and Granby, Connecticut. It now has three times the population of its namesake. The population was 5,646 at the 2010 census.

The New England-like village of Granville, Ohio is home to Denison University and a host of shops and galleries that line the quaint, tree-lined streets of the downtown.
The historic Granville Inn was built in 1925

Granville is known for its New England character and historic architecture, including the Greek Revival Avery Downer House and many others. The Buxton Inn (1812) and the Granville Inn (1924) are two landmarks of Granville.

The Village is home to Denison University. The Homestead at Denison University is a residential student intentional community focusing on environmental sustainability.

Granville is the location of the prehistoric Alligator Effigy Mound, built by the indigenous people of the Fort Ancient culture, between 800 and 1200 CE, more than four hundred years before European contact. It may be an effigy of the underwater panther featured in Native American mythology. The mound is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography[edit]

Granville is located at 40°4′3″N 82°30′44″W / 40.06750°N 82.51222°W / 40.06750; -82.51222 (40.067520, -82.512316).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 4.71 square miles (12.20 km2), of which, 4.68 square miles (12.12 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 771
1860 801 3.9%
1870 1,109 38.5%
1880 1,127 1.6%
1890 1,366 21.2%
1900 1,425 4.3%
1910 1,394 −2.2%
1920 1,440 3.3%
1930 1,467 1.9%
1940 1,502 2.4%
1950 2,653 76.6%
1960 2,868 8.1%
1970 3,963 38.2%
1980 3,851 −2.8%
1990 4,244 10.2%
2000 3,167 −25.4%
2010 5,646 78.3%
Est. 2012 5,638 −0.1%
Sources:[7][8][9][10][11][12][5][13]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 5,646 people, 1,441 households, and 1,017 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,206.4 inhabitants per square mile (465.8/km2). There were 1,554 housing units at an average density of 332.1 per square mile (128.2/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 91.9% White, 2.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 3.6% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.7% of the population.

There were 1,441 households of which 36.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.4% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.05.

The median age in the village was 22 years. 18.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 38.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 12.1% were from 25 to 44; 21.4% were from 45 to 64; and 9.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 46.3% male and 53.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,167 people, 1,309 households, and 888 families residing in the village. The population density was 790.4 people per square mile (304.9/km²). There were 1,384 housing units at an average density of 345.4 per square mile (133.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.75% White, 0.69% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.01% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.14% of the population.

There were 1,309 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.4% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the village the population was spread out with 27.0% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $67,689, and the median income for a family was $89,210. Males had a median income of $72,250 versus $46,484 for females. The per capita income for the village was $39,221. About 3.9% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable natives and residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  8. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  14. ^ Niles' national register, Volume 61. Cambridge: Harvard University. 1841. p. 192. 

External links[edit]