Gravel Pit Chapel

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The Gravel Pit Chapel was established in 1715–6 in Hackney, then just outside London, for a Nonconformist congregation, which by the early 19th century began to identify itself as Unitarian. In 1809 the congregation moved to the New Gravel Pit Chapel nearby, while its old premises were taken over by Congregationalists. The New Gravel Pit Chapel was closed and demolished in 1969.

History[edit]

The Gravel Pit Chapel was established in 1715–6 in Hackney, then a village north-east of London, for a congregation seceding from that of John Barker, after the death of Matthew Henry.[1][2] It took its name from the gravel pit near the bowling green in Mare Street.[1]

In 1809 the congregation moved to new premises in Paradise Place in 1809, and began to identify itself as Unitarian. The original building, from then on known as the "Old Gravel Pit Chapel" was taken over by Congregationalists. The New Gravel Pit Chapel was rebuilt in a Gothic style in 1857, and remained in use until its closure and demolition in 1969, although between 1940 and 1953 services were held in the church hall due to bomb damage.[1] The former Old Gravel Pit Chapel still exists;[3] in 2004 it was in use as a shoe factory.[3] It was later described as being at the west end of Retreat Place, a row of almshouses.[4]

Original Gravel Pit congregation[edit]

The Mare Lane congregation went back to William Bates (1668).[5]

New Gravel Pit Chapel[edit]

The Unitarian New Gravel Pit congregation first met on 4 November 1810, in a new building designed by the architect Edmund Aikin, who provided his services without charge.[10] It included Charles Hennell, David Ricardo and Daniel Whittle Harvey.[1]

In 1858 the chapel was rebuilt in a Gothic style, to the designs of Arthur Ashpitel.[1][11]

Old Gravel Pit Chapel (Congregationalist)[edit]

In 1810 a congregationalist group, who had seceded from the Ram's Chapel in Homerton after the death of John Eyre,[1] leased the old Gravel Pit Chapel, then in Morning Lane, Hackney.[13] They had gathered from 1804 at Homerton College.[1]

The last service in the Old Gravel Pit Chapel was held in 1871. The congregation moved to the new Round Chapel, on the Clapton Park Estate.[1][13] From 1874 there was an Old Gravel Pit mission in the building.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i T. F. T. Baker (Editor) (1995). "Hackney: Protestant Nonconformity". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  2. ^ T. F. T. Baker (Editor) (1995). "Hackney: Homerton and Hackney Wick". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  3. ^ a b www.ukunitarians.org.uk, London Unitarian Heritage Trail.
  4. ^ G. E. Mitton, Sir Walter Besant (editor), Hackney and Stoke Newington (1908), pp. 16–7; archive.org.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Vestiges of Protestant Dissent by George Eyre Evans (PDF), at pp. 145–6.
  6. ^ John Davies (1853). An account of the Old gravel pit meeting house, Hackney, with notices of its ministers. p. 14. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  7. ^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1894). "Mayo, Daniel". Dictionary of National Biography 37. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  8. ^ John Davies (1853). An account of the Old gravel pit meeting house, Hackney, with notices of its ministers. p. 22. Retrieved 17 June 2013. 
  9. ^ David Young (1992). F. D. Maurice and Unitarianism. Oxford University Press. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-19-826339-5. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Robert Brook Aspland (1850). Memoir of the Life, Works and Correspondence of the Rev. Robert Aspland, of Hackney. E.T. Whitfield. p. 255. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  11. ^ Dictionary of Unitarian & Universalist Biography, Robert Brook Aspland.
  12. ^ booth.lse.ac.uk, Search survey notebook.
  13. ^ a b Hackney Historic Buildings Trust, History of The Round Chapel.
  14. ^ Benjamin Clarke (1986). David Mander, ed. Glimpses of Ancient Hackney and Stoke Newington. London Borough of Hackney. p. 99. ISBN 1870165004.