Great Mosque of Salé

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Great Mosque of Salé

The Great Mosque of Salé (Arabic: المسجد الأعظم‎, Masjid Al Aadam) is a mosque in Salé, Morocco. Covering an area of 5,070 m2 (54,600 sq ft), it is the third-largest mosque in Morocco, and was originally built between 1028 and 1029.[1] It has been destroyed and rebuilt several times since the original construction. It was built in Almoravid and Almohad architectural styles, and the mosque features nine arches.[2] It was severely damaged in the Bombardment of Salé of 1851, and was briefly closed during the French protectorate in Morocco.

History[edit]

The Great Mosque of Salé was built under the orders of Temim Ibn Ziri from 1028 to 1029,[3] and was restored and enlarged in 1196 under Abu Yusuf Yaqub al-Mansur's orders, making it the third-largest mosque in Morocco, after the Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca (largest) and the mosque of the University of al-Qarawiyyin. It has been destroyed and rebuilt many times since that date.[1]

According to historian Abd Al-Mun'im Al-Hasidi, 700 French slaves were involved in the reconstruction under al-Mansur's orders, and the reconstruction added a madrasa.[3] In 1260, Salé was occupied by Castilian forces, and 3,000 women, children and elderly residents of the city were gathered in the mosque and taken as slaves for Seville.[1] In 1851, Salé was bombarded by French forces, and the mosque was severely damaged after being struck by six cannonballs.[4]

During the French protectorate in Morocco, the mosque was used for nationalist gatherings in the 1930s, led by people such as Said Hajji, Ahmed Maâninou, Boubker el-Kadiri, and Abu Bakr Zniber.[5] The French protectorate later[when?] closed the mosque to prevent it being used as a place to awaken awareness of nationalist sentiment, but it later[when?] re-opened.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Mrini, Driss; Alaoui, Ismaïl (1997). Salé: Cité Millénaire (in French). Editions Eclat, Rabat. pp. 45–46. ISBN 9981-9995-0-4. 
  2. ^ "Great Mosque of Salé". Wassila. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "وزارة الأوقاف و الشؤون الإسلامية" (in Arabic). Islamic Morocco. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  4. ^ Muḥammad bin 'Alī Dukkālī (1986). Al-Ithaf Al Wajiz, Tarikh Al-Adwatayn (in Arabic). Salā, al-Maghrib: al-Khizānah al-ʻIlmīyah al-Ṣabīḥīyah. p. 337. OCLC 427353826. 
  5. ^ a b ʻAbd al-Raʼūf ibn ʻAbd al-Raḥmān Ḥajjī (2007). Saïd Hajji : naissance de la presse nationale Marocaine. Lebonfon Inc. ISBN 9780973223613. OCLC 183181000. 

Coordinates: 34°01′46″N 6°50′10″W / 34.0295°N 6.8360°W / 34.0295; -6.8360