Great South Run

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Bupa Great South Run is an annual 10 miles (16.09 km) road running race which takes place in Portsmouth, United Kingdom providing an intermediate distance between the ten kilometre and the half marathon (21.097 km) runs. Launched in 1990, it is part of the Great Run series created by former British athlete Brendan Foster.[1] It was originally held in Southampton, but the race moved to its current course after the first edition.[2]

The Bupa Great South Run has become one of Europe's most popular mass participation races over 10 miles, with a record 21,000 entries for the 2009 race.[3] Although the elite race is an IAAF Gold Label Road Race which attracts some of the most successful professional runners,[4] it is not a recognised distance for purposes of IAAF records.[5] World record holder Paula Radcliffe and 2007 World Champion Luke Kibet are among the past winners. It has been sponsored by BUPA since 1992.[2]

The 1999 edition of the race was selected to be the Amateur Athletic Association 10-mile championships that year.[6] Paula Radcliffe won the women's race in 2008 in a time of 51 minutes 11 seconds, a new British record.[7] Kenyan runner Joseph Ebuya won the 2010 edition in 45:15 minutes, which was a significant improvement upon the previous UK all-comers record held by the 1995 winner Benson Masya.[8]

Channel 5 broadcasts The Great South Run every year.

Past winners[edit]

Course record holder Sonia O'Sullivan took consecutive wins in 2002–2003.
Mo Farah won the race in 2009.

Key:       Course record

Edition Year Men's winner Time (m:s) Women's winner Time (m:s)
1st 1990  Marti ten Kate (NED) 47:52  Alison Gooderham (GBR) 56:09
2nd 1991  Thomas Naali (TAN) 47:11  Olga Bondarenko (URS) 53:16
3rd 1992  Boay Akonay (TAN) 47:04  Iulia Negura (ROM) 53:19
4th 1993  Gary Staines (GBR) 46:11  Iulia Negura (ROM) 53:01
5th 1994  Gary Staines (GBR) 47:00  Gitte Karlshøj (DEN) 54:49
6th 1995  Benson Masya (KEN) 45:56  Liz McColgan (GBR) 53:12
7th 1996  Gary Staines (GBR) 46:57  Derartu Tulu (ETH) 52:39
8th 1997  Christopher Kelong (KEN) 46:53  Liz McColgan (GBR) 52:00
9th 1998  Stéphane Franke (GER) 47:40  Marian Sutton (GBR) 54:17
10th 1999  Simon Kasimili (KEN) 47:42  Esther Kiplagat (KEN) 54:42
11th 2000  Gert Thys (RSA) 48:26  Restituta Joseph (TAN) 55:10
12th 2001  Khalid Skah (MAR) 46:17  Restituta Joseph (TAN) 52:36
13th 2002  Simon Kasimili (KEN) 47:27  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) 51:00
14th 2003  John Yuda (TAN) 46:35  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) 53:26
15th 2004  Hendrick Ramaala (RSA) 47:14  Benita Johnson (AUS) 52:32
16th 2005  John Yuda (TAN) 46:45  Derartu Tulu (ETH) 51:27
17th 2006  Simon Arusei (KEN) 47:17  Jo Pavey (GBR) 52:46
18th 2007  Luke Kibet (KEN) 47:31  Rose Cheruiyot (KEN) 53:44
19th 2008  Bernard Kipyego (KEN) 46:42  Paula Radcliffe (GBR) 51:11
20th 2009  Mo Farah (GBR) 46:25  Inês Monteiro (POR) 52:32
21st 2010  Joseph Ebuya (KEN) 45:15  Grace Momanyi (KEN) 52:03
22nd 2011  Leonard Komon (KEN) 46:18  Aselefech Mergia (ETH) 52:55
23rd 2012  Stephen Mokoka (RSA) 46:40  Jo Pavey (GRB) 53:01
24th 2013  Emmanuel Bett (KEN) 48:03  Florence Kiplagat (KEN) 53:53
25th 2014  James Rungaru (KEN) 46:31  Belaynesh Oljira (ETH) 52:40

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ IAAF back Nova International in street racing initiative. Great Run (18 May 2009). Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  2. ^ a b History and Tradition. Great Run. Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  3. ^ Hedley, Nicola (19 October 2009). Kibet seeks another victory in Portsmouth. IAAF. Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  4. ^ Ndereba to headline women's 10-miler field in Portsmouth. IAAF (29 September 2009). Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  5. ^ "Gebrselassie approaching Record for Running Records". International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). 16 March 2006. Retrieved 25 April 2012. 
  6. ^ British Road Race Championships – Great South Run winners. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  7. ^ Superb Radcliffe wins Great South. BBC Sport (26 October 2008). Retrieved on 25 October 2009.
  8. ^ Martin, Dave (24 October 2010). Ebuya clocks the fastest ever 10 Miles in UK. IAAF. Retrieved on 24 October 2010.

External links[edit]