Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service

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Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service
Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service.png
England Police Forces (Greater Manchester).svg
Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service area
Coverage
Area Greater Manchester
Size 496 sq mi (1,280 km2)
Population 2,500,000
Operations
Formed 1974
HQ Pendlebury
Staff 2,641
Stations 41
Co-responder No
Chief Fire Officer Steve McGuirk
Fire authority Greater Manchester Fire Authority
Website Greater Manchester Fire & Rescue Service

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, England.

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service covers an area of approximately 496 square miles (1,280 km2). The service has 41 fire stations which until 2006 were organised into three territorial Area Commands (South, East and West), each one with an Area Command Headquarters, based at Stretford, Rochdale and Bolton respectively. When the brigade altered the command area's structure they divided the three area commands from South, East and West to 11 Borough Commands, aligned to the 10 local authorities in the county: Bolton, Bury, Manchester (North/South), Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The service employs 2,641 personnel, of which 2,174 are uniformed operational personnel, 64 control room staff, and 403 non-uniformed support staff.

The Service's headquarters is located in Pendlebury, Salford.[1]

Fire stations[edit]

Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service operates 41 fire stations.

Wholetime[edit]

  • Wigan: W54 Wigan (2 Water Tender Ladders), Hindley W55 (Water Tender Ladder), W56 Atherton (Water Tender Ladder, Operational Support Unit), W57 Leigh (Two Water Tender Ladders, Hydraulic Platform, Enhanced Rescue Unit)
  • Bolton: W50 Bolton Central (Two Water Tender Ladders, Hydraulic Platform, High Volume Pump, Decontamination Unit), W51 Bolton North (Water Tender Ladder, Hose Layer, Pinzgauer 6x6), W52 Horwich Day Crewing (not wholetime) (Water Tender Ladder),W53Farnworth (Two Water Tender Ladders,Foam Unit, Incident Response Unit)
  • Bury: E36 Bury (Two Water Tender Ladders), E37 Whitefield (Water Tender Ladder, Canteen Van), E38 Ramsbottom (Two Water Tender Ladders)
  • Rochdale: E30 Rochdale (Two Water Tender Ladders), E31Littleborough (Two Water Tender Ladders), E32 Heywood (Two Water Tender Ladders, Water Incident Unit)
  • Oldham: E33 Oldham (Two Water Tender Ladders, Hyraulic Platform), E34 Hollins (Water Tender Ladder), E35 Chadderton
  • Trafford: S10 Stretford (Two Water Tender Ladders,Hydraulic Platform, High Volume Pump),S11Sale (Water Tender Ladder,Foam Unit),S12 Altrincham (Water Tender Ladder)

History[edit]

Headquarters in Pendlebury

The service was created when the county of Greater Manchester came into being in 1974. It had, until fairly recently, been called the Greater Manchester County Fire Service. The change in name reflects the growing number of roles the service now has, and many services across the United Kingdom are also changing their names to "Fire and Rescue Service". This change was inspired by new primary legislation for England and Wales, The Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004.[2]

The service was originally administered by the Greater Manchester County Council, but when this was abolished in 1986, administration of the service was taken over by a joint authority of the ten Metropolitan Boroughs of Greater Manchester, known as the "Fire and Rescue Authority". Five members are appointed by Manchester City Council, two each by Bury and Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Councils, and three each by the remaining seven borough councils of Greater Manchester.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The official street address is given as Swinton, but the premises are in neighbouring Pendlebury
  2. ^ The Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004, Pub TSO, (accessed 19 Oct 2006)
  3. ^ Local Government Act 1985 (1985 c.51), schedule 10, part II

External links[edit]