Greek legislative election, 1951

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Parliamentary elections were held in Greece on 9 September 1951.[1] They resulted in an ambivalent outcome, consisting a narrow and pyrrhic, as proven later, victory for the ruling center-liberal parties of Sophoklis Venizelos and Nikolaos Plastiras.

Background[edit]

After the Greek elections of 1950, when the divided centrist parties had a clear majority in the Parliament political instability was the main characteristic of the political life in Greece. The subsequent centre-liberal governments of Sophoklis Venizelos, Nikolaos Plastiras and Georgios Papandreou did not manage to ensure and enforce stability. As a result, Nikolaos Plastiras supported a People's Party government, under the terms that the latter would soon conduct elections.

Outcome[edit]

First party in the elections of 1951 was the just-founded Greek Rally of Alexandros Papagos, which swept the traditionally dominant right-wing People's Party. Nevertheless, the two major centrist-liberal parties, the Liberal Party and the National Progressive Center Union, elected more deputies than the conservatives.

The left-wing EDA, a party believed to have been affiliated with the outlaw during 1950-1974 Communist Party of Greece, made its first appearance in these elections.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Greek Rally 624,316 36.5 114 New
National Progressive Center Union 401,379 23.5 74 +29
Liberal Party 325,390 19.0 57 +1
United Democratic Left 180,640 10.6 10 New
People's Party 113,876 6.7 2 –60
Georgios Papandreou Party 35,810 2.1 0 –35
Agricultural and Labour Party 21,009 1.2 1 New
Socialist Party of Greece 3,912 0.2 0 New
List of Independents 1,554 0.1 0 0
Communist Archio-Marxist Party of Greece 1,148 0.1 0 New
Independents 965 0.1 0 0
Invalid/blank votes 8,108
Total 1,717,107 100 258 +8
Registered voters/turnout 2,224,246 77.2
Source: Nohlen & Stöver
Popular vote
ES
  
36.53%
EPEK
  
23.49%
KF
  
19.04%
EDA
  
10.57%
LK
  
6.66%
KGP
  
2.10%
AEK
  
1.23%
Others
  
0.38%
Parliament seats
ES
  
44.19%
EPEK
  
28.68%
KF
  
22.09%
EDA
  
3.88%
LK
  
0.78%
AEK
  
0.39%

Aftermath[edit]

Since no party or alliance had the absolute majority in the Parliament and Alexandros Papagos refused to participate in a government of national unity, the Liberal Party and the National Progressive Center Union formed a minority government under the leadership of Nikolaos Plastiras, which lasted for about a year, since 1952, when Nikolaos Plastiras submitted his resignation and new legislative elections were proclaimed by the King Paul I.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p830 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7