Green Party of Ontario candidates, 2003 Ontario provincial election

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The Green Party of Ontario fielded 102 candidates in the 2003 provincial election in Ontario, Canada, none of whom were elected. The only riding which the party did not contest was Oakville. Zakaria Belghali had been selected as the GPO candidate, but did not collect enough signatures to have his candidacy validated by Elections Ontario.

Contents

Ron Yurick (Algoma—Manitoulin)[edit]

From Chapleau, where he is a member of the Watershed Management Study Committee. Formerly chaired a Public Liaison Committee relating to the Adams Mine Landfall Proposal in Timiskaming. Testified before a Select Committee on Ontario in Confederation in 1991. Yurick supports the principle of bilingualism, opposes the British monarchy, and believes that Northern Ontario's concerns are often ignored by the Canadian government and business elite.[1] A member at large on the Green Party of Ontario council. Opposes sending garbage from Toronto to Kirkland Lake. Led the party's constitutional rewriting process in 2004. Received 680 votes (2.4%), finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Mike Brown of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Brian Elder Sullivan (Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot)[edit]

Formerly in the University of New Brunswick's Computer Science program. Opposes West Nile Virus spraying programs, as potentially more dangerous than the disease itself. Received 903 votes (1.86%), finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Ted McMeekin of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Stewart Sinclair (Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford)[edit]

Has described the Green Party as a democratic movement, while referring to the New Democratic Party as a "hardened bureaucracy".[2] Formerly a Marxist, but now believes that Marxist theory became stagnant in the 1930s.[3] Now lives in Toronto—Danforth. Responsible for developing the Green Party of Canada's monetary policy in the 2004 federal election. Received 1,278 votes (2.1%), placing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Joseph Tascona of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Tom Mason (Beaches—East York)[edit]

A pro-business figure within the Green Party. With leader Frank de Jong, co-presented the Green Party's plan to assist entrepreneurs through economic incentives. A "Tom Mason" works a curator of invertebrates at the Toronto Zoo, though it is not clear this is the same person. Received 1,995 votes (4.81%), finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Michael Prue of the Ontario New Democratic Party.

Ernst Braendli (Bramalea—Gore—Malton—Springdale)[edit]

A member of the Brampton Environmental Community Advisory Panel. In 2005, accused the city of Brampton of "scrambling for infrastructure" to accommodate high growth. Has also suggested making public transportation free of charge to achieve reduced pollution levels.[4] Received 1,176 votes (2.78%), finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Kuldip Kular of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Sanjeev Goel (Brampton Centre)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 820 votes (2.14%), finishing fourth out of five candidates. The winner was Linda Jeffrey of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Paul Simas (Brampton West—Mississauga)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 811 votes, finishing fifth out of six candidates. The winner was Vic Dhillon of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Brant: Mike Clancy[edit]

Mike Clancy was born in London, Ontario and raised in St. Thomas. He received a degree in religious studies and ethics from the University of Waterloo in the 1970s. Clancy was an employment counsellor with the federal employment and immigration department and its successor, Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), from 1980 until quitting in 1997.[1] When he left his job, he said that he could not administer its program under terms that he considered "immoral and unethical." He strongly supported government funding for social programs and health care, and criticized both federal and provincial governments for cutting back these services.[2]

He ran for the governing New Democratic Party of Ontario in the northern division of Kenora in the 1995 provincial election and expressed concern that the Progressive Conservatives would target the poor and unemployed if they won the election. The Progressive Conservatives did win the election and later introduced massive cuts to social assistance; Clancy said the severity of the cuts was unexpected and produced extreme hardship among poorer people in Kenora.[3]

Clancy subsequently accused federal parliamentarians Jane Stewart and Robert Nault of using HRDC job-creation funds for dubious political goals during the period of Jean Chrétien's government.[4] Stewart rejected Clancy's claims, describing them as "the simple-minded agenda of a failed provincial NDP candidate."[5]

After leaving HDRC, Clancy moved to Brantford. He considered seeking the New Democratic Party's nomination for the 1999 provincial election, but ultimately did not do so.[6] In 2000, he ran against local Member of Parliament (MP) Jane Stewart as a candidate of the fringe Canadian Action Party.[7] During this period, Clancy was a private advocate for Canadians whose Employment Insurance benefits had been cut off by the federal government; he also accused the government of misusing the private information of many Canadians.[8]

Clancy later because active with the Green Party and ran under its banner in the 2003 provincial election.[9] He also sought election to the Brantford city council in 2003 and ran for a regional council position in Waterloo three years later. In the 2006 election, he supported the legalization of marijuana and prostitution.[10] He also called for more police officers and a greater voice for the rural areas around Waterloo.[11]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
1995 provincial Kenora New Democratic Party 2,788 16.36 3/3 Frank Miclash, Liberal
2000 federal Brant Canadian Action 447 1.05 6/6 Jane Stewart, Liberal
2003 provincial Brant Green 1,014 2.28 4/5 Dave Levac, Liberal
2003 municipal Brantford Council, Ward Five n/a 245 3.65 6/7 Marguerite Ceschi-Smith and John Starkey
2006 municipal Waterloo Regional Council, Councillor n/a 1,553 4.26 5/5 Sean Strickland and Jane Mitchell

Martin Donald (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound)[edit]

Martin Donald was born in Hamilton, Ontario and raised in Brantford. He and his wife Melody Donald were organic sheep farmers in Meaford at the time of the election. Martin is a secondary school art teacher and a carriage maker. He blamed the outgoing Progressive Conservative administration's cut backs and poor environmental policies for the tainted-water disaster in Walkerton, which is in the riding. Criticized PC leader Ernie Eves for attempting to regain support in the riding with financial grants. Received 769 votes (1.7%), finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Bill Murdoch of the Progressive Conservative Party.

Julie Gordon (Burlington)[edit]

Julie fought to prevent the implementation of workfare in Hamilton and argued (in the 1999 provincial election campaign) that child care and child rearing should be considered as work. Unpaid work is an important issue covered by the Genuine Progress Indicators, (GPI), which were designed to replace the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a means of measuring progress. A single stay-at-home mother, and a former figure for the anti poverty working group at Ontario public interest research group...OPIRG McMaster University, she worked with Wendell Fields in the anti poverty Flyering Squad, Herb Joseph, Human Rights activist, OPIRG working group in 2004-06. Fields and Gordon were prominent figures in Hamilton Against Poverty. Gordon is associated with the Communist Party of Canada - Marxist-Leninist, and ran for that party in the 2000 federal election. Gordon received 1,086 votes in the 2003 provincial election, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner in Burlington was Cam Jackson of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. She is presently working with O.P.I.R.G. organizing an Indoor Air Pollution group. Her mother is an artist named Mavis ehlert,who has a sculpture named Diane in front of the Ancaster Public library within the sixty mile limit.

Previous candidacies:

Michael Chownyk (Cambridge)[edit]

Was 28 years old at the time of the election. Sells and installs winds and solar-power generating units. Received 983 votes, finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Gerry Martiniuk of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Jim Burgess (Chatham-Kent—Essex)[edit]

Was 46 years old at the time of the election. Worked with Navistar for 26 years, and has more recently started a bookstore. Has spoken in favour of wind turbine energy. Received 1,069 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Pat Hoy of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Mark O'Brien (Davenport)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 907 votes, finishing fourth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Tony Ruprecht of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Dan Craig (Don Valley East)[edit]

No information. Received 558 votes, finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was David Caplan of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Philip Hawkins (Don Valley West)[edit]

Was Chief Financial Officer of the Green Party of Ontario at the time of the election. Is also president of the federal Don Valley West association for the Green Party of Canada. Advisory committee chair of Don Valley West One-Tonne Challenge, established to reduce average per capita emissions of greenhouse gases. Received 1,239 votes, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Kathleen Wynne of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Frank de Jong (Dufferin—Peel—Wellington—Grey)[edit]

Party leader. See has biography page for further details. Received 3,161 votes, finishing third in a field of five candidates. The winner was outgoing Ontario Premier Ernie Eves of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Gordon MacDonald (Durham)[edit]

Was present at the GPO's education policy 2003 announcement. Argued that accredited private schools should receive funding under the local school administration. Received 1,183 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was John O'Toole of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Mark Viitala (Eglinton—Lawrence)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 1,236 votes, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Mike Colle of the Ontario Liberal Party.

John R. Fisher (Elgin—Middlesex—London)[edit]

Retired. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, and worked as a teacher for 25 years. His main field of expertise was Geography. Was reeve of Rodney, Ontario in the early 1990s, and served on the Elgin County Council. Previously served as a councillor in Rodney for fifteen years. Chaired the Ontario/Quebec chapter of Common Ground-USA in 2002. Has also written on the history of the Georgist movement in Canada.[5] Is himself a Georgist, favouring site-value taxation, and helped make this an official policy of the Green Party. Supports higher taxation on community-owned land to prevent urban sprawl. An executive director of the Henry George School of Economic Science, and president of the Henry George Foundation in Canada. Received 673 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Steve Peters of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Previous candidacies:

Tom Ferguson (Erie—Lincoln)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 713 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Tim Hudak of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Darren J. Brown (Essex)[edit]

Brown was 32 years old at the time of the election, and manager of the finance department of the Community Care Access Centre in Windsor (Windsor Star, October 1, 2003). In addition to his own candidacy, he served as the GPO's fundraising chair in Windsor West during the 2003 campaign. Brown is a board member of the Citizen's Environment Alliance of southwestern Ontario.

Brown acknowledged that the GPO was not going to form government in the 2003 election, and claimed that the party's intention was to increase its number of cnadidates and share of the popular votes (Windsor Star, September 25, 2003).

He had previously campaigned for the GPO in Windsor—St. Clair in the 1999 provincial election, and finished fourth in a field of six candidates with 339 votes (0.88%). The winner was Dwight Duncan of the Ontario Liberal Party. During this election, Brown described himself as a computer systems analyst (Windsor Star, May 12, 1999).

Brown received 998 votes in 2003, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Liberal Bruce Crozier.

Ralph M. Chapman (Etobicoke Centre)[edit]

Received 1,584 votes. The winner was Donna Cansfield of the Ontario Liberal Party. Co-creator and writer of "The Jane Show" to begin airing summer of 2006. Wrote and starred in "Now Watch This Drive" at the 2003 Toronto Fringe Festival. Also interested in human and animal rights issues.

Junyee Wang (Etobicoke—Lakeshore)[edit]

No information. Received 708 votes, finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Laurel Broten of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Mir Kamal (Etobicoke North)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 503 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Shafiq Qaadri of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Louise Pattington (Glengarry—Prescott—Russell)[edit]

Retired translator. Lives in Fournier, near Vankleek Hill. Not politically active prior to her retirement. President of the GPO riding association in Glengarry—Prescott—Russell. Provides translation for the Green Party of Canada's living platform. Received 1,471 votes, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Jean-Marc Lalonde of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Ben Polley (Guelph—Wellington)[edit]

Raised in Kemptville, near Ottawa. Educated at Carleton University, where he received a degree in Geography. Managed DML Control Inc., working in the field of energy management computer system. Owns Harvest Homes, an eco-friendly home construction business. Promotes strawbale construction. Constructed "Home Alive!", the world's first prefabricated strawbale house. Managed Mike Nagy's campaign in the 2004 federal election. Also works with Seventh Generation Community Projects. Received 3,917 votes (7.0%), the highest vote total of any GPO candidate in the 2003 election. The winner was Liz Sandals of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Graeme Dunn Haldimand—Norfolk—Brant)[edit]

Was 62 years old in 2003. Teaches computer studies at Mohawk College in Hamilton. Has a third-level degree from the Society of Management Accountants. Coordinated the 2003 Green Party of Ontario platform. Ran for Chief Financial Officer of the GPO in 2001, but lost to Martin Hart, 244 votes to 154. Opposes large-scale hog operations in his region. Previously campaigned for the Green Party of Canada in the 2000 federal election, and received 484 votes in Brant for a fifth-place finish out of six candidates. The winner was Jane Stewart of the Liberal Party of Canada. Received 1,088 votes in 2003, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Toby Barrett of the Progressive Conservative Party.

Douglas J. Smith (Haliburton—Victoria—Brock)[edit]

Homeopathic doctor. Supports healthy lifestyles and alternative medicine. Is Secretary of the Ontario Homeopathic Association for 2004-05. Works in Haliburton. Received 956 votes, finishing fourth out of six candidates. The winner was Laurie Scott of the Progressive Conservative Party.

Matthew Raymond Smith (Halton)[edit]

No information. Received 1,295 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Ted Chudleigh of the Progressive Conservative Party. However, Matthew Raymond Smith was applauded for his effort. He was voted the funniest candidate to ever run on the green party platform while wearing red.

Raymond Dartsch (Hamilton East)[edit]

A registered nurse, active in Hamilton since 1998. Was 34 years old in 2003. A graduate of Mohawk College and McMaster University. Supported the preservation of the Canadian Southern Railway in 2000. Produced "No Peace in the Valley" (1998), a video calling for the preservation of Hamilton's Red Hill Valley in the face of a proposed expressway. Supports hourly rail passenger service in its place. Chairs the Transportation subcommittee for the Green Party of Canada. Received 563 votes, finishing fourth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Dominic Agostino of the Ontario Liberal Party. Campaigned for the GPO again in a 2004 by-election, following Agostino's death. Praised Agostino as one of the more environmentally conscious members of the Liberal Party, but claimed the party itself was lacking in its policies. Received 448, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Andrea Horwath of the Ontario New Democratic Party. Horwath is known as one of the more environmentally active members of the NDP; after the campaign, Dartsch joked that he would one day draft her into the Greens.

Selwyn Inniss (Hamilton Mountain)[edit]

As of 2004, was the primary contact for the GPO in Hamilton Mountain. Received 494 votes (1.09%), finishing last in a field of five candidates. The winner was Marie Bountrogianni of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Jo Pavlov (Hamilton West)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 727 votes, finishing fifth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Judy Marsales of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Adam Scott (Hastings—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington)[edit]

A relatively young candidate. Received 1,311 votes (3.2%), finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Leona Dombrowsky of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Shelley Hannah (Huron—Bruce)[edit]

Little information available. Not to be confused with a different Shelley Hannah, who has written on adoption rights. Received 934 votes, finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Carol Mitchell of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Dan King (Kenora—Rainy River)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 305 votes, finishing last in a field of four candidates. The winner was Ontario New Democratic Party leader Howard Hampton.

Eric Walton (Kingston and the Islands)[edit]

Walton received 3,137 votes (6.55%), finishing fourth against Liberal incumbent John Gerretsen.

Luigi D'Agnillo (Kitchener Centre)[edit]

Was a PhD student at the time of the election, taking Chemical Engineering at the University of Waterloo. Born in Calgary, Alberta, moved to Kitchener-Waterloo in 1994. Received his Master's Degree in 1997. Appointed to the Waterloo Regional Cycling Advisory Committee in 2000. Supports public automobile insurance for Ontario, on a no-fault basis for personal injuries. A vocal opponent of Slobodan Milošević during the 1990s. Supported the Kosovo War of 1998, but called for ground troops instead of air strikes. Received 1,728 votes, finishing fourth in a field of four candidates. The winner was John Milloy of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Pauline Richards (Kitchener—Waterloo)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 1,774 votes, finishing fourth in a field of seven candidates. The winner was Elizabeth Witmer of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario.

Tim van Bodegom (Lambton—Kent—Middlesex)[edit]

No information. Received 1,133 votes (2.76%), finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Maria van Bommel of the Ontario Liberal Party.

John Baranyi (Lanark—Carleton)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 2,564 votes for a credible fourth-place finish. The winner was Norm Sterling of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada.

Jerry Heath (Leeds—Grenville)[edit]

Born circa 1935. A retired engineer. Spent his career working for the multinational chemical company Union Carbide. Also a jazz trombonist, and is leader of the Jerry Heath Jazz Quintet. First became active with environmental issues in Surrey, British Columbia in the early 1970s, when then-mayor Bill Vander Zalm proposed construction of a shopping mall on a square kilometre of old-growth forest. Heath helped form the South Surrey Study Group, a citizens' coalition opposing the development. Following pressure, the development layout was changed such that the old-growth forest was preserved.

After retiring, Heath moved to the Township of Athens, a small municipality in the Ottawa Valley. In the 2000 federal election, Heath replaced Dr. Peter Bevan-Baker as the Green Party of Canada candidate for Leeds-Grenville and received 820 votes (1.75%). The winner was Joe Jordan of the Liberal Party of Canada. Heath became president of the combined federal/provincial riding associations soon after the election. In 2003, he advocated compact fluorescent bulbs to prevent brownouts in Ontario. This idea was later promoted by provincial party leader Frank de Jong.

In 2003, Heath received 1,865 votes (4.25%). The winner was Bob Runciman of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario. Heath originally intended to contest the 2004 federal election, but withdrew out of concern for exhaustion.

Bronagh Joyce Morgan (London North Centre)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 780 votes, finishing fourth in a field of six candidates. The winner was Deb Matthews of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Bryan Smith (London—Fanshawe)[edit]

Chair of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation Human Rights and Status of Women Committee for the Thames Valley District. Head of French-as-a-Second-Language and English at the Thames Valley District School Board. Received 568 votes, finishing fourth in a field of five candidates. The winner was Khalil Ramal of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Matt Takach (Nepean—Carleton)[edit]

Takach (born September 24, 1979)[6] was a criminology student at Carleton University during the 2000 federal election.[7] He began working for the Green Party on a full-time basis after his graduation, and was the GPC's national organizer during the 2004 federal election (for which he was not a candidate). He is still the party's director of organization as of 2005.

During the 2003 election, Takach described the Green Party's policies as fiscally responsible and socially aware" (Ottawa Citizen, September 27, 2003). He has rejected the view that the Green Party is solely focused on environmentalism.[8]

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
2000 federal Ottawa West—Nepean Green 585 1.1 5/10 Marlene Catterall, Liberal
2003 provincial Nepean—Carleton Green 2,200 3.76 4/4 John R. Baird, Progressive Conservative

Chris Bradshaw (Ottawa Centre)[edit]

Bradshaw led the Green Party of Canada from 2001 to 2003. Received 3,821 votes (7.73%) for a credible fourth-place finish. See his biography for further information.

Melanie Ransom (Ottawa—Orléans)[edit]

Melanie Ransom is a consultant, research analyst, and former dance instructor. She was a co-founder of the Free Wheel Blue Bike Society, and has served as president of Citizens for Safe Cycling in Ottawa. She is formerly a resident of Victoria, British Columbia, where she served as business outreach manager for the Victoria LETS organization. Ransom subsequently moved to Ottawa, and supported a smoking ban there in 2000. She once made a solo bicycle trip across the Eastern Sierre de Madre in Mexico.

Ransom received 1,402 votes (2.79%) in the 2003 election. The winner was Phil McNeely of the Ontario Liberal Party. She supported Tom Manley's bid for the party leadership in 2004, and David Chernushenko in 2006. As of 2006, Ransom is the Chair of the Green Party of Canada.

David Chernushenko (Ottawa South)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 1,741 votes (3.65%), finishing fourth. The winner was Dalton McGuinty, leader of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Raphael Thierrin (Ottawa—Vanier)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 1,876 votes (4.53%), finishing fourth. The winner was Madeleine Meilleur of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Neil Adair (Ottawa West—Nepean)[edit]

See Green Party of Canada candidates, 2004 federal election for biography. Received 1,309 votes (4.53%), finishing fourth. The winner was Jim Watson of the Ontario Liberal Party.

Gregory Elliott Laxton (Trinity—Spadina)[edit]

Laxton joined the Green Party in 2000, and was a policy spokesman for the party in 2002 in the aftermath of a government report into the tainted-water tragedy in Walkerton, Ontario. He argued that water is a "public good", and "should not be a privately-run entity". "If you want to make sure the water is safe," he argued, "you should have it run by a not-for-profit entity like the government." (Hamilton Spectator, June 18, 2002).

He received 2,362 votes in 2003 (5.82%), finishing fourth against New Democratic Party incumbent Rosario Marchese.

Laxton was 36 years old as of 2005, and served as the GPO's fundraising chair from 2000 to 2003. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies and History from Trent University, and a Masters degree in Political Science at York University. [9]

Allan Douglas Strong (Waterloo—Wellington)[edit]

Strong is a mental-health advocate, and is a social worker with the Canadian Mental Health Association (Kitchener-Waterloo Record, September 23, 2003) and serves as president of the Wellness Network in Ontario as of 2005.[10] In 1997, he testified before a committee of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario as a representative of the Mood Disorders Association of Ontario.[11] Strong himself has acknowledged suffering from bipolar disorder.[12]

Strong was previously a member of the New Democratic Party, and campaigned under its banner in the 2000 election. In early 2003, he announced his decision to run as a Green Party candidate. He has also sought election at the municipal level.

In 2005, Strong wrote in support of the Kyoto Accord (Kitchener-Waterloo Record, February 22, 2005).

Electoral record
Election Division Party Votes  % Place Winner
2000 federal Waterloo—Wellington NDP 1,845 4.11 4/6 Lynn Myers, Liberal
2003 provincial Waterloo—Wellington Green 1,203 4/4 Ted Arnott, Progressive Conservative
2003 municipal Wilmot Township Council, Ward 3 Ind. 50 6.17 4/4 Terry Broda

The 2003 municipal results are unofficial totals, taken from the Kitchener-Waterloo Record, November 12, 2003, B8. The final results were not significantly different. Strong also campaigned for municipal office in 1997, but the results are not available online.

Chris Holt (Windsor—St. Clair)[edit]

Holt was 35 years old at the time of the election. (Windsor Star, September 23, 2003). He has an educational background in Urban and Regional Planning, and was a tool and die maker in Windsor at the time of the 2003 election. He has been involved in community groups such as; chairing the Windsor Bicycling Committee, the Windsor Essex County Environmental Committee, member of the board of directors of both the Citizens Environment Alliance and Windsor's branch of the Ontario Public Interest Research Group. He has written on sustainable development and social equity, contributing frequently to Windsor's daily and weekly newspapers.

Holt campaigned for the Canadian House of Commons in a by-election held on May 13, 2002, in Windsor West, due to the departure of Deputy Prime Minister Herb Gray. He received 655 votes, finishing fifth out of six candidates. The winner was Brian Masse of the New Democratic Party. Reports from this period listed Holt as a skilled trades worker for Ford of Canada. (Windsor Star, May 11, 2002)

He received 1,315 votes (3.67%) in the 2003 Provincial election, finishing fourth against the future Liberal Finance Minister and Minister of Energy Dwight Duncan. In the 38th General 2004 federal election, Holt was the campaign manager for the two Windsor Green Party candidates, Elizabeth Powles (Windsor - Tecumseh, 1613 votes, 3.6%) and Rob Spring (Windsor West, 1545 votes, 3.49%) (Elections Canada). In the 39th General Election of 2006, Holt was campaign Manager for Catherine Pluard in Windsor Tecumseh (1644 votes, 3.23%)

Cary M. Lucier (Windsor West)[edit]

Lucier was born and raised in the Windsor community. He graduated from Assumption High School in 1982, and later served with the Canadian Navy. He joined the Windsor Fire Department in 1986. Lucier later became a private businessman, serving as president of the Stak-Its Toy Company and writing children's storybooks.[13]

He received 1,233 votes (3.50%) in the 2003 election, finishing fourth against Ontario Liberal Party incumbent Sandra Pupatello.

By-elections[edit]

Nick Boileau (Whitby—Ajax, March 30, 2006)[edit]

Boileau was a 22-year-old resident of Whitby at the time of the election, and was a third year student in Criminology at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. He is bilingual in French and English, and is described as having a particular interest in human rights and social justice.[14] According to unofficial results, he received 307 votes (0.89%) for a fourth-place finish against Progressive Conservative candidate Christine Elliott.

Peter V. Tretter (Nepean—Carleton, March 30, 2006)[edit]

Peter V. Tretter (born 1979) was the Green party candidate in the 2006 provincial by-election in Nepean—Carleton. A student at Athabasca University in general studies, he is also taking American Sign Language at Algonquin College. He was previously a student at Ryerson University. At the time of the election Tretter had been living in Greely, Ontario. Tretter is currently seeking the Green Party of Canada nomination for Ottawa South.

Peter was a Beaver leader. The Beavers are the youngest sub-group of Scouts Canada.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Beales, "Clancy has issueswith HRDC," Brantford Expositor, 17 November 2000, A6.
  2. ^ Vincent Ball, "Candidate steps forward for NDP," Brantford Expositor, 22 February 1999, A3.
  3. ^ Allison Bray, "Soup kitchen business booms," Winnipeg Free Press, 18 December 1995, A5.
  4. ^ Daniel LeBlanc and Paul Adams, "Ottawa says it lacked clear rules on job grants," Globe and Mail, 22 February 2000, A1.
  5. ^ Jim Brown, "Bloc MP thought job grants were for his riding," Kitchener-Waterloo Record, 24 February 2000, A05.
  6. ^ Susan Gambe, "Sharpe gets NDP nod," Brantford Expositor, 12 April 1999, A3.
  7. ^ Dan Nolan, "Don't call this city 'Grantford'," Hamilton Spectator, 17 November 2000, A10.
  8. ^ Mike Clancy, "Is the HRDC database really dead?", Brantford Expositor, 3 June 2000, A12; "Action party's Clancy comes last in riding," Brantford Expositor, 28 November 2000, A5.
  9. ^ Clancy was president of Brant's Green Party of Canada association in the same period. See Michael-Allan Marion, "Wanted: True Green candidate," Brantford Expositor, 29 April 2004, A3; Alissa von Bargen, "The Green alternative," Brantford Expositor, 1 June 2004, A3.
  10. ^ "Prescient machine, parrots and other tidbits," Kitchener-Waterloo Record, 14 November 2006, B2.
  11. ^ "St. Jacobs resident seeks role on regional council," Kitchener Record, 26 September 2006, B5.