Yellow-fronted canary

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Yellow-fronted canary
Yellow-fronted Canary.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Fringillidae
Genus: Serinus
Species: S. mozambicus
Binomial name
Serinus mozambicus
(Müller, 1776)
Synonyms

Crithagra mozambica

Photographed at Queen Elizabeth NP, Uganda

The yellow-fronted canary (Serinus mozambicus) is a small passerine bird in the finch family. It is known elsewhere and in aviculture as the green singing finch.

This bird is a resident breeder in Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Its habitat is open woodland and cultivation. It nests in trees, laying 3–4 eggs in a compact cup nest.

The yellow-fronted canary is 11–13 cm in length. The adult male has a green back and brown wings and tail. The underparts and rump are yellow, and the head is yellow with a grey crown and nape, and black malar stripe. The female is similar, but with a weaker head pattern and duller underparts. Juveniles are greyer than the female, especially on the head.

The yellow-fronted canary is a common, gregarious seedeater. Its song is a warbled zee-zeree-chereeo.

Phylogeny[edit]

It has been obtained by Antonio Arnaiz-Villena et al.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Serinus mozambicus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Alvarez-Tejado M., Ruiz-del-Valle V., García-de-la-Torre C., Varela P, Recio M. J., Ferre S., Martinez-Laso J. (1999). "Rapid Radiation of Canaries (Genus Serinus)". Mol. Biol. Evol. 16: 2–11. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.molbev.a026034. 
  3. ^ Zamora, J; Moscoso J, Ruiz-del-Valle V, Ernesto L, Serrano-Vela JI, Ira-Cachafeiro J, Arnaiz-Villena A (2006). "Conjoint mitochondrial phylogenetic trees for canaries Serinus spp. and goldfinches Carduelis spp. show several specific polytomies". Ardeola 53: 1–17. 

External links[edit]