Green Township, New Jersey

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Green Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Green
Map of Green Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Green Township in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Green Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Green Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°58′27″N 74°48′09″W / 40.974073°N 74.802584°W / 40.974073; -74.802584Coordinates: 40°58′27″N 74°48′09″W / 40.974073°N 74.802584°W / 40.974073; -74.802584[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated December 27, 1824
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Daniel C. Conkling (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Linda Peralta[4]
 • Clerk Linda Peralta[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 16.256 sq mi (42.104 km2)
 • Land 15.983 sq mi (41.397 km2)
 • Water 0.273 sq mi (0.707 km2)  1.68%
Area rank 168th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 597 ft (182 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 3,601
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 3,630
 • Rank 429th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county[12]
 • Density 225.3/sq mi (87.0/km2)
 • Density rank 496th of 566 in state
15th of 24 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07821 - Andover, New Jersey[13]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3403727420[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882264[16][2]
Website www.greentwp.com

Green Township is a township in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,601,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 381 (+11.8%) from the 3,220 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 511 (+18.9%) from the 2,709 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

History[edit]

On November 20, 1824, the southern portion of Sussex County was set off to create Warren County. The northern portions of both Hardwick and Independence Townships, remained in Sussex County and were incorporated as Green Township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 27, 1824.[18]

In 1829, part of Green Township were transferred to Byram Township, and in 1853 Green Township was expanded to include a section of the old Newtown Township. On February 24, 1904, Fredon Township was incorporated from a portion of the township.[18] In 1881, the area was listed as 19.65 square miles (50.9 km2); and today Green encompasses 16.5 square miles (43 km2). The township was named after Ephraim Green, who settled near Greendell in 1770. Many sections of Green retain their identity as Tranquility, Huntsville, Greendell and Yellow Frame.[19]

Tranquility was originally known as Kennedytown, named for Amos Kennedy who settled here. When the location for the Tranquility Methodist Church was being chosen, a disagreement arose over erecting it in Allamuchy Township or Kennedytown. A compromise was affected, with the church being erected halfway between the two points. To memorialize the agreement, the church was named Tranquility. Later, Kennedytown took the church's name as its own.[19][20]

The westbound Lackawanna Limited coming off the Pequest Fill on the Lackawanna Cut-off in Tranquility, about 1-mile (1.6 km) east of the station in Greendell. This 1912 photo was the basis for a Phoebe Snow poster advertising how the Cut-Off cut off 11 miles (18 km) from the trip to Buffalo, New York. The so-called "borrow pits" that provided fill for the Pequest Fill can be seen to the right. The original Tranquility schoolhouse stood not far from this location, but was torn down to make way for the Pequest Fill. The Lackawanna Railroad paid for a new schoolhouse.

In 1911, the Lackawanna Cut-off rail line opened through Green Township, with a stop at Greendell Station. The Cut-Off was part of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad's mainline from Hoboken to Buffalo. The line was abandoned in 1980 and the tracks were removed four years later.[21] New Jersey Transit is considering reactivating passenger service on the line extending to Scranton, Pennsylvania, with a proposed maintenance-of-way facility at Greendell that would incorporate the surviving station building.[22]

In August 2006, a documentary titled The History of Green Township was produced by Kelsey Falkowski. The video includes historical landmarks, interviews with lifelong citizens of Green Township, and leads up to the contemporary view of the township. Copies can be obtained through the Green Township Historical Society.[23]

Geography[edit]

Green Township is located at 40°58′27″N 74°48′09″W / 40.974073°N 74.802584°W / 40.974073; -74.802584 (40.974073,-74.802584). According to the United States Census Bureau, Green township had a total area of 16.256 square miles (42.104 km2), of which, 15.983 square miles (41.397 km2) of it is land and 0.273 square miles (0.707 km2) of it (1.68%) is water.[2][1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 801
1840 777 −3.0%
1850 823 5.9%
1860 1,023 24.3%
1870 868 −15.2%
1880 727 −16.2%
1890 636 −12.5%
1900 627 −1.4%
1910 888 * 41.6%
1920 454 −48.9%
1930 539 18.7%
1940 540 0.2%
1950 596 10.4%
1960 854 43.3%
1970 1,343 57.3%
1980 2,450 82.4%
1990 2,709 10.6%
2000 3,220 18.9%
2010 3,601 11.8%
Est. 2012 3,630 [11] 0.8%
Population sources:
1830-1920[24] 1840[25] 1850-1870[26]
1850[27] 1870[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32] 2000[33][34] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[18]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,601 people, 1,181 households, and 996.8 families residing in the township. The population density was 225.3 per square mile (87.0 /km2). There were 1,251 housing units at an average density of 78.3 per square mile (30.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.78% (3,413) White, 1.25% (45) Black or African American, 0.03% (1) Native American, 1.72% (62) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.78% (28) from other races, and 1.44% (52) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.80% (173) of the population.[8]

There were 1,181 households, of which 43.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 76.0% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.6% were non-families. 11.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.04 and the average family size was 3.31.[8]

In the township, 28.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 21.5% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.9 years. For every 100 females there were 100.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.9 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $103,693 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,229) and the median family income was $113,971 (+/- $20,140). Males had a median income of $85,591 (+/- $9,018) versus $50,583 (+/- $7,305) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,546 (+/- $3,396). About 1.3% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.8% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[35]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 3,220 people, 1,046 households, and 890 families residing in the township. The population density was 199.0 people per square mile (76.8/km²). There were 1,069 housing units at an average density of 66.1 per square mile (25.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.49% White, 0.93% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.96% Asian, 0.28% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.20% of the population.[33][34]

There were 1,046 households out of which 45.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.9% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.9% were non-families. 11.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.07 and the average family size was 3.34.[33][34]

In the township the population was spread out with 30.8% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 26.5% from 45 to 64, and 6.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 104.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.3 males.[33][34]

The median income for a household in the township was $84,847, and the median income for a family was $89,788. Males had a median income of $61,576 versus $33,393 for females. The per capita income for the township was $34,127. About 0.9% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[33][34]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Green Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2014, members of the Green Township Committee are Mayor Daniel C. Conkling (R, term as mayor ends December 31, 2014; term on committee ends in 2015) Deputy Mayor Margaret "Peg" Phillips (R, 2014), James P. Chirip (R, 2016), Steven Kurzeja (R, 2014) and Jason J. Reinbold (R, 2016).[4][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Green Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][40][41]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[42] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[43][44] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[45][46]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[47][48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[51] As of 2013, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2013),[52] Deputy Director Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[53] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2013),[54] Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015)[55] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[56][51] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[57] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott,[58] Sheriff Michael F. Strada[59] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[60][57] The County Administrator is John Eskilson[61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,449 registered voters in Green Township, of which 337 (13.8% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,015 (41.4% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,096 (44.8% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[62] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 68.0% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 94.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[62][63]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,206 votes here (68.4% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 525 votes (29.8% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 28 votes (1.6% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,762 ballots cast by the township's 2,507 registered voters, for a turnout of 70.3% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[64] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,271 votes here (66.0% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 629 votes (32.7% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.0% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,925 ballots cast by the township's 2,417 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.6% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,270 votes here (70.4% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 515 votes (28.5% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 15 votes (0.8% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,805 ballots cast by the township's 2,230 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.9% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 925 votes here (70.1% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 257 votes (19.5% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 116 votes (8.8% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 16 votes (1.2% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,320 ballots cast by the township's 2,404 registered voters, yielding a 54.9% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[67]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Green Township School District. Green Hills School had an enrollment of 485 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[68] Green Hills has been accepted into New Jersey's Interdistrict Public School Choice Program beginning with the 2013-2014 school year, under which students from outside Green Township may attend Green Hills as long as they live within a radius of 20 miles (32 km).[69]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Newton High School in Newton, together with students from Andover Borough and Andover Township, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Newton Public School District.[70][71]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Green Township include:

  • Lucy Page Mercer Rutherfurd (1891–1948), interred in Green Township, she is considered by historians to have been a mistress of United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and was with him on the day he died in 1945.[72]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed January 15, 2014. Source lists a 2013 term-end year as of date accessed.
  4. ^ a b [1], Green Township. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Green. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Green, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Green township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Green township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Green, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  18. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 230. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  19. ^ a b History, Township of Green. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  20. ^ History of Green Township , Green Township Historical Society. Accessed September 9, 2013.
  21. ^ Barnickel, Don; and Williams, Paula. "Touring the Lackawanna Cutoff", Skylands Visitor. Accessed September 9, 2013.
  22. ^ "New Jersey - Pennsylvania Lackawanna Cut-Off Passenger Rail Service Restoration Project Environmental Assessment", New Jersey Transit, December 2006. Accessed September 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Video History Project, Green Township Historical Society. Accessed September 9, 2013.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 31, 2013.
  25. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  26. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 271, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed February 20, 2013. "Greene contained in 1850, 823 inhabitants; in 1860, 1,023; and in 1870, 868."
  27. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  28. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 7194. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 20, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Green township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Green township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  35. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Green township, Sussex County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 29, 2012.
  36. ^ Summary Report - Group detail / General Election November 8, 2011, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 10, 2011. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  37. ^ County Summary With Detail - General Election: November 6, 2012, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  38. ^ Nov. 5, 2013 General Election – Winners List, Sussex County. Accessed January 15, 2014.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 58, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  43. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  44. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  45. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  46. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  47. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  48. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ a b Sussex County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  52. ^ Richard A. Vohden, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  53. ^ Phillip R. Crabb, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  54. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  55. ^ Dennis J. Mudrick, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  56. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  57. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
  58. ^ Home Page, Sussex County Clerk's Office. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  59. ^ Sheriff's Office, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  60. ^ Surrogate's Court, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed April 25, 2013.
  61. ^ County Administrator, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed January 10, 2013.
  62. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Sussex, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  63. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  64. ^ General Election November 6, 2012: District Report - Group Detail, Sussex County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 30, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Sussex County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  68. ^ Data for the Green Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed February 20, 2013.
  69. ^ Approved Choice Districts 2013-2014, Interdistrict Public School Choice Program. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  70. ^ Newton High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 9, 2013. "Newton High School serves students from Andover Township, Andover Borough, and Green Township as well as historic Newton."
  71. ^ About Us, newton Public School District. Accessed February 20, 2013. "The Newton Public School District is a K-12 district with an enrollment over 1,500 students in our elementary, middle, and high schools. The high school is home to Newton residents as well as students from neighboring Andover Borough, Andover Township, and Green Township."
  72. ^ "Possible FDR affair has Green Twp. connection", KWWL (TV), January 28, 2012. Accessed February 20, 2013. "Mercer is of particular interest to Sussex County residents as she and her husband Winthrop Rutherfurd maintained a home in Allamuchy and they are buried in the Tranquility Cemetery in Green."

External links[edit]