Greenbank Road

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Pinecrest Mall.

Greenbank Road is a major north-south road in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada that serves central Nepean and Barrhaven. From its northern terminus at the Queensway until its intersection with Jockvale Road, it is designated Ottawa Road #13.

Greenbank Road is a continuation of Pinecrest Road (which starts at Carling Avenue) at its interchange with the Queensway. There are two churches on Pinecrest Road, Britannia United Church and All Saints Lutheran Evangelical Church. There are several stores near the Queensway, in a complex called Pinecrest Shopping Centre which includes the IKEA superstore, a Chapters book store, a Corbeil electronics store, a Michaels arts and crafts store, a Sears Home Decor, a Linen Chest decoration store as well as a Starbucks coffee shop.

South of the shopping centre, there are several apartment buildings while heading south to Baseline Road. Greenbank Road is an artery for the communities of Craig Henry, Trend Village, and Arlington Woods, passing by Sir Robert Borden High School and Greenbank Middle School. Between Hunt Club Road and Fallowfield Road, Greenbank passes through the Greenbelt as a two-lane road. Traffic used to be quite heavy along this stretch of road as Barrhaven grew but has since been alleviated by the construction of Highway 416 to the west in 1999 and the widening of Woodroffe Avenue to the east in 2005.

In Barrhaven, Greenbank Road is a major road serving the older neighbourhoods. Several big-box stores line the road just south of Fallowfield Road and also around Strandherd Drive. One of the shopping complex is called Riocan Marketplace which includes a Loblaws, a Winners, a Wal-Mart, a Staples Business Depot Business Depot, a Tim Hortons, a Wendy's, a Dairy Queen grill and chill a GNC, and other smaller stores. Other large stores in the vicinity includes a Loeb, a Home Depot and a Canadian Tire. Most of the road in Barrhaven is four lanes, except for a bottleneck in which traffic is reduced to two lanes to cross the CN Rail tracks. There are plans by the city to widen the road from two to four lanes.[1]

South of old Barrhaven, Ottawa Road #13 (and most traffic) follows Jockvale Road to serve newly developed communities. Greenbank Road continues as a rural road south to Prince of Wales Drive. A narrow bridge crossing the Jock River discourages most traffic, although there are plans to re-align the road and end near Cambrian Road as part of the extension of the proposed widening of the road.

Major intersections[edit]

On Pinecrest Road

On Greenbank Road

Communities[edit]

History[edit]

The land was granted by the Crown to Mary Twohey (loyalist grant) who conveyed to Rice Honeywell, who conveyed to Bernard Hughes, who died 12th April 1876 in possession thereof, leaving his widow Catherine Hughes and ten children surviving. By his will, the land was granted to his widow for life and to his sons Barnabas N. and William. Barnabas and William conveyed the land to their mother, Catherine Hughes, in fee on 12 April 1876. On 3 November, 1877, Catherine Hughes conveyed ten acres to her daughter Alice Jane, the wife of David Richardson and ten acres to her daughter Catherine, the wife of William Hogg. Catherine Hughes lived in the dwelling-house with her son William until her death in 1884. [2] Mr Hugh Sydney Arkell & his wife purchased the old Hughes farm in 1911 and operated Highclere Dairy. After living for a year in the old Hughes farmhouse, Mr & Mrs. Arkell built Arkell House. The Arkells sold the Highclere Dairy's 7 milk runs to Borden Dairy. In 1956 Campeau Corp, a home builder, acquired 114 acres of the Arkell farm on Pinecrest Road intending to extend the Queensview Industrial Area on the Northside of the proposed Queensway, now the Queensway Heights neighbourhood. [3] Arkell House and adjoining land was donated by Margaret Arkell, in her parent's memory to "Britannia United Church". Britannia United Church used Arkell House as a mixed use community/church center, for example housing the Ottawa Boys' Club from September 18, 1966 until the mid 1970s. [4]

References[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing