Greenhorn Mountain

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Greenhorn Mountain
Greenhorn.JPG
Greenhorn Mountain seen from Walsenburg, Colorado
Elevation 12,352 ft (3,765 m) NAVD 88[1]
Prominence 3,767 ft (1,148 m)[2]
Location
Greenhorn Mountain is located in Colorado
Greenhorn Mountain
Greenhorn Mountain
Colorado
Location Huerfano / Pueblo counties, Colorado, U.S.
Range Wet Mountains
Coordinates 37°52′53″N 105°00′48″W / 37.88139°N 105.01333°W / 37.88139; -105.01333Coordinates: 37°52′53″N 105°00′48″W / 37.88139°N 105.01333°W / 37.88139; -105.01333[1]
Topo map USGS San Isabel
Climbing
Easiest route Hike

Greenhorn Mountain is the highest mountain and point in the Wet Mountains, at an elevation 12,352 feet (3,765 m), and is located in southern Colorado. The peak's summit reaches above tree line, which is at about 11,500 feet (3,500 m) in central-southern Colorado.

Geography[edit]

The massive Greenhorn Mountain can be seen from Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Trinidad, and also from along Interstate 25 rising nearly 7,000 feet (2,100 m) above the surrounding valleys. The mountain's habitats are protected within the secluded Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness Area, which is only accessed by a few trails and a 4-wheel drive road on its the north.

Name Origin[edit]

The name comes from the name Cuerno Verde (Green Horn) given by the colonial Spanish of the Provincias Internas to two, father and son, Jupe Comanche band mahimiana paraibo or war chiefs. The younger Cuerno Verde was known to the Comanches as "Man Who Holds Danger." On September 3, 1779 younger Cuerno Verde, along with his son, medicine man, 4 principal chiefs, and 10 of his warriors, was killed near the Greenhorn Mountain by the men of the expedition of Spanish troops and native American allies (Apache, Ute and Pueblo) under Juan Bautista de Anza.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Greenhorn Mtn". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey. Retrieved 2011-02-23. 
  2. ^ "Greenhorn Mountain, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2011-02-23. 
  • Elizabeth A.H. John, Storms Brewed in Other Men's Worlds, Texas A&M University Press, College Station 1875, pages 584-589.
  • Pekka Hämäläinen, The Comanche Empire,Yale University Press, New Haven & London 2008, pages 103-104

External links[edit]