Greg Lee (basketball)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Greg Lee
No. 2, 42
Guard
Personal information
Born (1951-12-12)December 12, 1951
Reseda, California
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Listed weight 190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school Raseda (Reseda, California)
College UCLA (1971–1974)
NBA draft 1974 / Round: 7 / Pick: 115th overall
Selected by the Atlanta Hawks
Career history
1974–1975 San Diego Conquistadors
1975–1976 Portland Trail Blazers
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Gregory Scott Lee (born December 12, 1951) is a retired American basketball player. He was the starting point guard on back to back NCAA championship teams at UCLA in 1972 and 1973. He then played two seasons of professional basketball: one in the original American Basketball Association and one in the National Basketball Association.

Lee, a 6'3" guard from Reseda High School in Reseda, California, played for UCLA from 1971 to 1974. He was a three-year starter at guard for the Bruins, and won two championships in 1972 and 1973.[1] Prior to joining the varsity team, Lee (17.9 ppg), along with Keit Wilkes (20.0 ppg) and Bill Walton (18.1, 68.6 per cent), was a member of the 20–0 UCLA Frosh team.[2]

After his collegiate career ended, Lee was drafted by both the NBA and ABA. The Atlanta Hawks drafted him in the seventh round (115th pick overall) of the 1974 NBA Draft and the San Diego Conquistadors drafted him in the fifth round of the ABA Draft the same year. He chose the Conquistadors, averaging 3.6 points and 2.6 assists in five games. The next season he moved to the NBA, appearing in five games for the Portland Trail Blazers and averaging 1.2 points and 2.2 assists.[3] He was also an accomplished beach volleyball player on the professional circuit.[4]

Lee became a high school coach and teacher in California after his playing days were over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2010-11 UCLA men's basketball media guide, accessed August 4, 2011
  2. ^ 1972 Official Collegiate Basketball Guide, College Athletics Publishing Service, 1971
  3. ^ [1], accessed August 4, 2011
  4. ^ Mike Reilley (August 14, 1992). "On the beach: Menges, Lee recall a different era". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 4, 2011. 

External links[edit]