Greg Walker (baseball)

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Greg Walker
Greg Walker and Roger McDowell before a 2014 Braves game.jpg
Walker (left) with the Braves in 2014
First baseman / Coach
Born: (1959-10-06) October 6, 1959 (age 55)
Douglas, Georgia
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 18, 1982 for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
July 1, 1990 for the Baltimore Orioles
Career statistics
Batting average .260
Home runs 113
Runs batted in 444
Teams

As Player

As Coach

Career highlights and awards

Gregory Lee Walker (born October 6, 1959 in Douglas, Georgia) is a former power-hitting first baseman in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played in MLB from 1982 to 1990. He is the former hitting coach of the Chicago White Sox, the team for which he played all but the last 14 games of his career, until leaving the White Sox to become the hitting coach for the Atlanta Braves, a position he held from 2012 until 2014.

Playing career[edit]

Walker was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1977. He was seleted by the White Sox in the Rule 5 draft in 1979. He was called up to the major leagues in 1982 and spent almost his entire MLB playing career with the White Sox. In 1988 he had a seizure on the field at Comiskey Park during fielding practice.[1] He was released by Chicago early in the 1990 season and subsequently signed with the Baltimore Orioles. Baltimore released him shortly thereafter.[2]

Over his career, Walker hit 113 home runs and drove in 444 runs, while scoring 368 times.

Coaching career[edit]

When he began his coaching career, he did so with the White Sox Triple-A club in Charlotte. In 2003, he joined the parent club as hitting coach.

After nine seasons serving as the hitting coach of the Chicago White Sox, including their victory in the 2005 World Series, it was announced on October 21, 2011 that Walker was hired by the Atlanta Braves to serve as their hitting coach for the 2012 season. Walker filled the role vacated by the firing of Larry Parrish.[3] Walker resigned in September 2014, as the team compiled a .241 batting average, 573 runs, 123 home runs, and 1,369 strikeouts, struggling mightily in the final month of the season.[4]

Personal[edit]

Walker is a cousin of Harry Spilman, a former MLB player.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Newman, Bruce (April 17, 1989). "Just Happy To Be Here". Retrieved August 27, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Greg Walker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 14, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Walker hired as Braves hitting coach". AJC.com. 21 October 2011. 
  4. ^ "Braves' Greg Walker resigns". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 30, 2014. Retrieved October 1, 2014. 

External links[edit]