Gregory Fossedal

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Gregory Fossedal (born 1959) is an American writer and political/economic theorist. He is the self-described chairman of the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution (AdTI).

Fossedal, Gordon Haff, Benjamin Hart, and Keeney Jones founded the Dartmouth Review in 1980. Fossedal graduated from Dartmouth College in 1981 magna cum laude with an A.B. in English Literature. His senior thesis on the Shakespearean sonnets was voted Highest Honors by the English department faculty.

Fossedal married Elisabeth Fossedal. They have six children; Christopher, Bridget, Donald, Thomas, Dominic, and John.

Past positions[edit]

Current positions[edit]

  • Chief Investment Officer, Democratic Century Fund, managed by the Emerging Markets Group
  • Member of the Board of Directors of the Democracy Foundation
  • Senior associate of SRS Investments (Zurich, Switzerland) - advises investors on national and global ideopolitical trends, and develops investment products for the securities industry.
  • UPI columnist
  • Executive committee chairman of the Ernest Martin Hopkins Institution, an independent association of Dartmouth alumni which encourages conservative social and political activists at the College
  • Associate Editor of EducationNews.org

Selected publications[edit]

  • Direct Democracy in Switzerland, (Transaction Publishers, 2002) [1] [2]. Fossedal makes a strong case for the introduction of the Swiss style of government in other Western European countries, the United States and many of the globe's nascent democracies. Fossedal discusses the benefits and viability of direct democracy and how and why it should be implemented elsewhere in the world.
  • The Democratic Imperative (New Republic Books, 1989), economic and political history
  • Marshall Plan Commemorative Section: Miles to Go: From American Plan to European Union Helmut Schmidt. A look back at perhaps the most important foreign policy success of the postwar period. Edited by Peter Grose, with contributions by historians Diane B. Kunz and David Reynolds, a memoir by Charles P. Kindleberger, a profile of Marshall and Acheson by James Chace and one of Will Clayton by Gregory Fossedal and Bill Mikhail; reflections from Roy Jenkins, Walt Rostow, and Helmut Schmidt.
  • Our Finest Hour (Stanford University, Hoover Press, 1993), economic and political history

See also[edit]

References[edit]