Gregory Foster

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named Greg Foster, see Greg Foster (disambiguation).

Sir (Thomas) Gregory Foster (10 June 1866 – 24 September 1931) was the Provost of University College London from 1904–1929,[1] and Vice-Chancellor of the University of London from 1928 to 1930.[2]

Early life[edit]

He was born in London and attended University College School[3] and graduated from University College London (UCL) in 1888 with a degree in English.[2] He obtained a PhD from Strasbourg University in 1892.[3]

Career[edit]

He first taught at UCL became a professor of English language and literature at Bedford College, London before returning to UCL where he spent 25 year in administration as secretary, principal and later provost.[2] As Vice-Chancellor of the University of London he was instrumental in having the new university building established in central London at Bloomsbury rather than Holland Park in west London.

Personal life[edit]

He was knighted in 1917 and created a baronet in 1930.

In 1894 he married Fanny Maude (d.1928) and they had two sons and two daughters.

He died in Hove, Sussex in 1931 and his second wife later the same year.[3]

See also[edit]


Academic offices
Preceded by
New Title
Provost of the University College London
1904–1929[1]
Succeeded by
Allen Mawer
Preceded by
William Beveridge, Baron Beveridge
Vice-Chancellor of the
University of London

1928-1930
Succeeded by
J. Scott Lidgett
Baronetage of the United Kingdom
New creation Foster baronets
(of Bloomsbury)
1930–1931 [1]
Next:
Thomas Saxby Gregory Foster[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Elizabeth J. Morse, ‘Foster, Sir (Thomas) Gregory, first baronet (1866–1931)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, Oct 2009 accessed 22 Dec 2010
  2. ^ a b c Sir Gregory Foster, Bt : Abstract : Nature
  3. ^ a b c AIM25 collection description
  4. ^ ‘FOSTER, Sir Thomas Saxby Gregory’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 22 Dec 2010