Gressenhall

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Coordinates: 52°41′57″N 0°54′08″E / 52.699165°N 0.902245°E / 52.699165; 0.902245

Gressenhall
Gressenhall Workhouse Museum.jpg
Gressenhall Workhouse Museum.
Gressenhall is located in Norfolk
Gressenhall
Gressenhall
 Gressenhall shown within Norfolk
Area  10.53 km2 (4.07 sq mi)
Population 1,008 
    - Density  96 /km2 (250 /sq mi)
OS grid reference TF964166
Civil parish Gressenhall
District Breckland
Shire county Norfolk
Region East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town DEREHAM
Postcode district NR20
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk

Gressenhall is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk.

It covers an area of 10.53 km2 (4.07 sq mi) and had a population of 1,008 in 443 households at the 2001 census.[1] For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of Breckland.

The village is on the River Whitewater close to East Dereham in Norfolk.

History[edit]

The Gressenhall Farm and Workhouse museum is located here, and a watermill dating from 1847. The main buildings of the Gressenhall workhouse were built in 1777 when it was a house of industry. Here paupers would work under quite a strict regime in return for accommodation.

This changed after the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834: as a result the building underwent numerous changes to comply with the Act. The workhouse was a poor law institution. Its purpose was to provide a home and work for the poor local people who had nowhere to live. Gressenhall was constructed in 1776 and took one year to open.

Gressenhall has a post office, a pub (The Swan) and a church.

Notable residents[edit]

  • Dr. Sean Radford of Radford Hall
  • Sir Jerome Alexander (died 1670), a High Court judge in Ireland noted for his severe sentences, was born in Gressenhall about 1590.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Census population and household counts for unparished urban areas and all parishes. Office for National Statistics & Norfolk County Council (2001). Retrieved 20 June 2009.

External links[edit]