Groove Me

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"Groove Me"
Single by King Floyd
from the album King Floyd
A-side "What Our Love Needs"
B-side "Groove Me"
Released 1970 (1970)
Recorded Malaco Records Studio
Jackson, Mississippi
Genre R&B, funk[1]
Length 03:04
Label Chimneyville, Atlantic
Producer(s) Wardell Quezergue
King Floyd singles chronology
"What Our Love Needs"
(1970)
"Groove Me"
(1970)
"Baby Let Me Kiss You"
(1971)

"Groove Me" is a song recorded by R&B singer King Floyd. Released from his eponymous album in late 1970, it was a crossover hit, spending four non-consecutive weeks at number-one on Billboard Soul chart and peaking at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100.[2]

The song was recorded and produced by Wardell Quezergue at Malaco Records' Jackson, Mississippi recording studios during the same session as another Quezergue-produced song, Jean Knight's "Mr. Big Stuff".[3] "Groove Me" was originally released as the B-side to Floyd's "What Our Love Needs" on the Malaco subsidiary Chimneyville. When New Orleans disc jockey George Vinnett started playing the B-side, the song began meriting attention, and as the record emerged as a local smash, Atlantic Records scooped up national distribution rights.[3]

Credits[edit]

No credits are listed for the Malaco studio musicians on the record. According the Rob Bowman's liner notes from the 1999 box set, The Last Soul Company: Malaco, A Thirty Year Retrospective, the musicians for this session included:

During this time at Malaco, horn lines were typically played by saxophonist Hugh Garraway and trumpeter Perry Lomax.[4]

Origin[edit]

According to Rob Bowman, Canadian professor of ethnomusicology, "Groove Me" had been inspired by a young college student who had worked about twenty feet away from Floyd at an east L.A. box factory. In Floyd's words: "She'd just watch me and smile at me all day. When I went to the water fountain, she would make it her purpose to come up to the water fountain. But, I was so shy. So, I decided one day that I was gonna write this poem and give it to her and I wrote 'Groove Me.' Believe it or not, after I finished it she never came back to work. It blew me away. So, I never gave her the poem. Man, I'd sure like to meet her one day just to thank her!"[5]

Cover versions[edit]

Use in film and television[edit]

  • The first line of the song "Aww, sookie sookie now" is a catchphrase used by Regine Hunter in the 1990s sitcom Living Single. It is also looped as a sample throughout the song "Six Secs" by the digital hardcore band Cobra Killer on their self-titled album from 1998.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Letsch, Glenn (2005). R & B Bass. Hal Leonard Corporation. pp. 24–25. ISBN 0634073702. Retrieved August 6, 2013. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 209. 
  3. ^ a b Billboard song info
  4. ^ Bowman, Rob. (1999). Malaco Records: The Last Soul Company. http://www.peermusic.com/ecard/LastSoulCompanyboxsetBooklet.pdf
  5. ^ Bowman, Rob. (1999). Malaco Records: The Last Soul Company, p. 17. http://www.peermusic.com/ecard/LastSoulCompanyboxsetBooklet.pdf
Preceded by
"Stoned Love" by The Supremes
Billboard's Best Selling Soul Singles number one single
January 2–16, 1971
Succeeded by
"If I Were Your Woman" by Gladys Knight & the Pips
Preceded by
"If I Were Your Woman" by Gladys Knight & the Pips
Billboard's Best Selling Soul Singles number one single
January 30, 1971
Succeeded by
"(Do The) Push and Pull" by Rufus Thomas