Grosjean v. American Press Co.

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Grosjean v. American Press Co.
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued January 13–14, 1936
Decided February 10, 1936
Full case name Alice Lee Grosjean, Supervisor of Public Accounts for the State of Louisiana v. American Press Co., et al.
Citations 297 U.S. 233 (more)
Holding
The Louisiana tax was an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Sutherland, joined by unanimous

Grosjean v. American Press Co., 297 U.S. 233 (1936), was a decision of the United States Supreme Court over a challenge to a separate sales tax on newspapers with circulation of over 20,000. The tax was being levied by the Huey Long administration in Louisiana in an attempt to tax newspapers critical of him into submission.

The Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, held that corporations were "persons" for purposes of analysis under the Equal Protection and Due Process clauses of the 14th Amendment, and found the tax to be an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Cortner, Richard C. (1996). The Kingfish and the Constitution: Huey Long, the First Amendment, and the Emergence of Modern Press Freedom in America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. ISBN 0-313-29842-4. 
  • Schwartz, Bernard (1992). Freedom of the press. New York: Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-2505-3. 

External links[edit]

  • Text of Grosjean v. American Press Co., 297 U.S. 233 (1936) is available from:  Findlaw  Justia  LII