Grub Street Journal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Published from January 8, 1730 to 1738,[1][2][3] The Grub-Street Journal was a satire on popular journalism and hack-writing as it was conducted in Grub Street in London.[4] It was largely edited by Richard Russel and the botanist John Martyn. While he disclaimed it, Alexander Pope was one of its contributors,[2][3] continuing his satire which he had started with The Dunciad.

After its end, The Literary Courier of Gruber Street succeeded it for a few months.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lounsbury, Thomas Raynesford (1908). The text of Shakespeare: its history from the publication of the quartos and folios down to and including the publication of the editions of Pope and Theobald. C. Scribner's sons. p. 383. 
  2. ^ a b Pope, Alexander; Croker, John Wilson; Elwin, Whitwell; Courthope, William John (1882). The works of Alexander Pope, Volume 4. J. Murray. p. 441. 
  3. ^ a b Pope, Alexander; Dennis, John (1891). The poetical works of Alexander Pope, Volume 3. G. Bell. p. 3. 
  4. ^ Lounsbury, Thomas Raynesford (1908). The text of Shakespeare: its history from the publication of the quartos and folios down to and including the publication of the editions of Pope and Theobald. C. Scribner's sons. p. 390. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Goldgar, Bertrand A., ed. (2002). The Grub-Street Journal, 1730-33. London: Pickering & Chatto. ISBN 1851967443.  Facsimile reprint in 4 volumes.
  • Hillhouse, James T. (1967) [1928]. The Grub-Street Journal (Reissued. Illustrated ed.). New York: Benjamin Blom. 

External links[edit]