Gruner + Jahr

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gruner + Jahr
Type Subsidiary
Genre Publishing house
Founded 1965
Founder(s) Henri Nannen
Gerd Bucerius
John Jahr Sr.
Richard Gruner
Headquarters Hamburg, Germany
Area served Europe
Key people Bernd Klaus Buchholz (CEO)
Torsten-Jörn Klein (head of International Magazines)
Products Newspapers, magazines
Employees 12,500
Subsidiaries Brown Printing Company (100%)
Prisma Presse S.N.C. (100%)
Motor Presse Stuttgart (59,9%)
NEWS Publishing Group (50%)
...
Website http://www.guj.de/
Gruner + Jahr, picture taken from the belltower of St. Michaelis Church

Gruner + Jahr AG & Co KG is the largest European printing and publishing firm. Its headquarters is in Hamburg, Germany.

History[edit]

Originally founded on 1 August 1948 as the Henri Nannen publishing house, Gruner + Jahr was created in 1965 from a merger by acquisition, by publishers John Jahr Sr. and Gerd Bucerius joining the printing firm of Richard Gruner. In 1969, Richard Gruner retired, and thanks to the entrepreneurship of Reinhard Mohn, Bertelsmann acquired 25% of the ownership. Over the next fifteen years, the firm grew by expansion, acquisition (publishers Kindler & Schiermeier) and merger (Spiegel Verlag and Motor-Presse Verlag). By 1976, Bertelsmann owned a 74.9% stake, and the Hamburg publishing family Jahr owned 25.1%, a balance which has been maintained through 2007.

In 1978, Gruner + Jahr became the first German publishing house to expand into other European and International markets. Over the next twenty years, publishing houses in France, the USA, and Spain were purchased, and a number of new magazines were started in Germany including Impulse, Schöner Essen, and Gala.

In 2005, Gruner + Jahr exited the U.S. magazine business, selling its women's magazine portfolio to the Meredith Corporation and its business magazine portfolio to Mansueto Ventures. In 2005-2006, Gruner + Jahr participated in the Du bist Deutschland marketing campaign.

In 2006, Gruner + Jahr surpassed Hubert Burda Media to become the largest European publisher, based on market share.[1]

Publications[edit]

Gruner + Jahr publishes approximately 285 magazines and newspapers in 22 countries, including Poland, Spain, Russia, France and the People's Republic of China. As of 2007, Gruner + Jahr publications include:

  • P.M. Magazin
  • Eltern
  • Eltern Family
  • Capital
  • Unternehmermagazin impulse
  • Art – Das Kunstmagazin

Operations[edit]

Headquarters G+J at “Baumwall”
with Hamburg subway in front, view from Elbe river side.

Bernd Kundrun is Chairman of the Board, and also a member of the executive committee of Bertelsmann. Gruner + Jahr has more than 12,500 employees and had gross profits for 2005 of 2.62 billion euro, of which 57% were from outside Germany.

Subsidiaries[edit]

In addition to direct publishing, Gruner + Jahr own interests in a number of other publishers and printers. They own 60% of Sächsische Zeitung, 56% of the NEWS Publishing Group, 25.5% of Spiegel Publishing and 95% of Henri-Nannen-Schule, a journalist school in Germany.

On 22 November 2011, it was announced that Gruner + Jahr AG & Co. KG transferred its entire 37.45-percent stake in the Prinovis Ltd. & Co. KG gravure joint venture to Arvato, another Bertelsmann division.[2]

Gruner + Jahr owns several publishers and printers outright (100%), including Brown Printing, the United States' third largest magazine printer and fifth largest catalog printer with facilities located in Waseca, Minnesota; East Greenville, Pennsylvania and Woodstock, Illinois,[3] and the second largest magazine printer in France, the Prisma Presse S.N.C. in Paris.

Gruner + Jahr established operations in India in 2008.[4] On 1 July 2011, Gruner + Jahr acquired a 78.75 percent interest in one of the leading publishing houses in India, MaXposure Media Group India Pvt Ltd.[5][6][7] This was followed by acquisition of digital ad network Networkplay March 2012[8] and acquisition of mobile ad-network SeventyNine.[9] In May 2014, Gruner + Jahr acquired a 50 percent interest in one of the leading Word-of-Mouth Marketing company in Europe trnd, to complete its adverting sales in press[10]

Henri Nannen Prizes[edit]

Gruner + Jahr annually awards the Henri Nannen Prizes, in five news categories: best reportage, best investigative report, best documentary, best humor piece, and best photojournalism article. The prizes are awarded in May for the previous year.

2004[edit]

  • Reportage: Stefan Willeke of "Die Zeit" for "Herr Mo holt die Fabrik" the 16 months of disassembling a coking plant in Dortmund and moving it to China[11]
  • Investigative: Freddie Röckenhaus of Süddeutsche Zeitung and Thomas Hennecke of Kicker for their investigation of financial scandel at "Borussia Dortmund"[11]
  • Documentary: The reporting team of Uwe Buse, Ullrich Fichtner, Mario Kaiser, Uwe Klussmann, Walter Mayr and Christian Neef from Der Spiegel for "Putin's Ground Zero" on the Beslan school hostage crisis[11]
  • Humor: not awarded to an individual[11]
  • Photography: Yang Yankang for his photoessay on Chinese Christians in Geo[11]
  • Lifetime: Peter Scholl-Latour[11][12]
  • Freedom of the Press: Irina Chalip of the Belarus publication Belorusskaja Delowaja Gaseta[11][12]

2005[edit]

  • Reportage: Bartholomäus Grill of Die Zeit[13]
  • Investigative: Kayhan Özgenç of Focus for exposing the Volkswagen scandel in his piece "Die VW-Affäre"[13][14]
  • Documentary: Henning Sussebach and Stefan Willeke of Der Zeit for their report "Operation Lohndrücken"[13]
  • Humor: Kurt Kister for his column "Unsere Besten" in Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin[13]
  • Photography: Jim Gehrz of the Minneapolis Star Tribune for his photoessay on Jessica Clements entitled "Against All Odds"[13]
  • Lifetime: Joachim Fest[13]
  • Freedom of the Press: Hrant Dink, editor-in-chief of the weekly Armenian paper Agos[13][14]
  • Editorial: Jim Amoss, editor-in-chief of the US newspaper The Times-Picayune[13]

2006[edit]

  • Reportage: Klaus Brinkbäumer of Der Spiegel
  • Investigative: Klaus Ott, Markus Balser and Hans Leyendecker of the Süddeutsche Zeitung
  • Documentary: Alexander Smoltczyk of Der Spiegel
  • Humor: Hans Zippert of Die Welt[15]
  • Photography: Alessandro Scotti of Geo[15]
  • Lifetime: Robert Lebeck, photographer
  • Freedom of the Press: Dmitri Muratow and the editorial staff at Novaya Gazeta, the independent Russian newspaper

2007[edit]

  • Reportage: Sabine Rückert for "Wie das Böse nach Tessin kam" ("How evil came to Tessin, Germany") in Die Zeit

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Schneider, Wolf (2000) Die Gruner-+-Jahr-Story: Ein Stück deutsche Pressegeschichte Piper, Munich, ISBN 3-492-04265-1
  • Steidle, Otto and Kiessler, Uwe (1991) Verlagshaus Gruner + Jahr Hamburg Oktagon Verlag, Munich, ISBN 3-927789-15-1
This article is based in part on material from the German Wikipedia.

External links[edit]