Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport (former)

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Guangzhou Baiyun
International Airport

广州白云国际机场
Guǎngzhōu Báiyún Guójì Jīchǎng
广州老白云国际机场夜景3711711.jpg
IATA: CANICAO: ZGGG
Summary
Airport type Public, Defunct
Operator Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport Co. Ltd.
Serves Guangzhou
Location Baiyun District
Elevation AMSL  m / 2 ft
Coordinates 23°11′14″N 113°16′5″E / 23.18722°N 113.26806°E / 23.18722; 113.26806Coordinates: 23°11′14″N 113°16′5″E / 23.18722°N 113.26806°E / 23.18722; 113.26806
Map
CAN is located in Guangdong
CAN
CAN
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
03/21 N/A N/A Paved (Closed)

Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport or Pai Yuen Airport was the main airport in Guangzhou, China, until August 5, 2004, when it was replaced by the identically named Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport, some 25 kilometres (16 mi) to the north. Opened in 1932, "Baiyun" means "white clouds" in Chinese, while the airport took its name from the adjacent Baiyun Mountain.

Aerial views of the old airport show re-development is complete with the previous site now obliterated by residential and commercial development.

History[edit]

The old airport opened in 1932. Due to the expansion of Guangzhou, the airport could not expand to meet passengers needs as buildings surrounded the airport. There were also complaints of noise from aircraft.[citation needed] On August 5, 2004, the new Baiyun airport opened and the old airport was closed.

Old terminal building now converted into a shopping mall

Incidents and accidents[edit]

CAAC Flight 2311[edit]

Main article: CAAC Flight 2311
  • On the 24 December 1982, an Ilyushin Il-18 on CAAC Flight 2311 was destroyed by fire after landing at the airport, 25 passengers were killed.

1990 Guangzhou Baiyun airport collisions[edit]

China Northwest Airlines Flight 2303[edit]

  • On 6 June 1994, China Northwest Airlines Flight 2303 broke up in mid-air and crashed near Xian, en route to Guangzhou from Xian. A maintenance error was responsible. All 160 people on board died.

See Also[edit]

List of defunct international airports