Gudi Padwa

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Gudhi Padva (Guḍhī Pāḍavā)
Gudi Padwa Gudi.PNG
A Gudhi is erected on Gudhi Padva
Official name Gudhi Padva or Samvatsar Padvo
Observed by Marathi Hindus, Konkani
Type Hindu lunar new year's Day
Celebrations 1 day
Date March/ April
2013 date April 11
2014 date March 31, Monday
2015 date March,21 [1]
Frequency annual
Related to Hindu calendar

Gudhi Padva (Marathi: गुढी पाडवा Guḍhī Pāḍavā), is the Marathi name for Chaitra Shukla Pratipada.[2] It is celebrated on the first day of the Chaitra month to mark the beginning of the New year according to the lunisolar Hindu calendar. This day is also the first day of Chaitra Navratri and Ghatasthapana also known as Kalash Sthapana is done on this day. The practice of raising the Gudhi was started by Shivaji Maharaj to welcome the new year and symbolizes victory "Vijay Dhwaj". Since then this culture of raising Gudhi's has been followed in and around the strong holds of the Maratha kingdom.

The word पाडवा(pāḍavā) or पाडवो(pāḍavo) comes from the Sanskrit word पड्ड्वा/पाड्ड्वो(pāḍḍavā/pāḍḍavo), which stands for the first day of the bright phase of the moon called प्रतिपदा (pratipadā) in Sanskrit.

In south India, first day of the bright phase of the moon is called pāḍya(Tamil: பாட்ய or பாட்டமி , Kannada: ಪಾಡ್ಯ, Telugu: పాడ్యమి, paadyami,Konkani: पाड्यॆ,ಪಾಡ್ಯ). Konkani Hindus variously refer to the day as संसर पाडवो or संसर पाड्यॆ (saṁsāra 'pāḍavo/ saṁsāra pāḍye),संसार (saṁsāra) being a corruption of the word संवत्सर (saṁvatsara). Konkani Hindus in Karnataka also refer to it as उगादि, ಯುಗಾದಿ(ugādi).

Guḍhī Pāḍavā in other languages, states and people[edit]

Known as Guḍhī Pāḍavā ("Gudhee Paadavaa") in Maharashtra, this festival is also known as[2]

In other parts of India[2] this festival is celebrated during

Etymology[edit]

The word Pāḍavā is derived from the Sanskrit word Pratipada[citation needed] for first day of a lunar month i.e. first day after new moon day (Amavasya). A Guḍhī is also hoisted on this occasion giving this festival its name. The term padva or padavo is also associated with Balipratipada the third day of Diwali[citation needed] which is another celebration that comes at the end of the harvesting season.

See also: Balipratipada

Significance[edit]

Astronomical[edit]

This new moon day has special meaning from Astronomy point of view. The Sun is supposed to be in first point of Aries, (Hamal) which is first sign of zodiac and is a natural beginning of spring. Many civilzations have known this. People of ancient Egypt knew this and Nowruz( literally "New Day" ) in Persia is also based on this observation. The Sun however may not be exactly in Aries due to Lunar month. This is adjusted by adding a "Adhik" (Literally an extra) Lunar month every three years to ensure New Year Day( "Gudhee Padwa") indeed matches observed season. See Panchang for details.

It has evolved into of many festivals Holi, Gudhee Padwa around this part of year in India It is one of the most famous harvesting festival in India.

Chronological[edit]

Being the first day of the first month of a year, Gudhi Padwa is the New Year's Day for Marathi people.[citation needed]

Agricultural[edit]

India is a predominantly agrarian society. Thus celebrations and festivals are often linked to the turn of the season and to the sowing and reaping of crops. This day marks the end of one agricultural harvest and the beginning of a new one. In this context, the Gudhi Padwa is celebrated at the end of the Rabi season. Guḍhī Pāḍavā is one of the Saadhe-Teen Muhurta (translation from Marathi: 3 and a half auspicious days) in the Indian Lunar calendar. The full list is as follows -

Historical[edit]

This day also commemorates the commencement of the Shaka calendar after Gautamiputra Satakarni, also known as Shalivahan defeated sakas in battle in 78 A.D.[6]

Religious[edit]

According to the Brahma Purana, this is the day on which Brahma created the world after the deluge and time began to tick from this day forth.[6]

Seasonal[edit]

On this day, the sun assumes a position above the point of intersection of the equator and the meridians. According to the Hindu calendar, this marks the commencement of the Vasanta ritu or the spring season.[6]

The Guḍhī[edit]

Gudhi

On Guḍhī Pāḍavā, a gudhi is found sticking out of a window or otherwise prominently displayed in traditional Maharashtrian households. Bright green or yellow cloth adorned with brocade (zari) tied to the tip of a long bamboo over which gaathi (sugar crystals), neem leaves[citation needed], a twig of mango leaves and a garland of red flowers is tied. A silver or copper pot is placed in the inverted position over it. Altogether, it is called as Gudhi. It is hoisted outside the house, in a window, terrace or a high place so that everybody can see it.

Some of the significances attributed to raising a Gudhi are as follows:

  • Maharashtrians also see the Gudhi as a symbol of victory associated with the conquests of the Maratha forces led by Chhatrapati Shivaji. It also symbolizes the victory of King Shalivahana over Sakas and was hoisted by his people when he returned to Paithan.[6]
  • Gudhi symbolizes the Brahmadhvaj (translation: Brahma’s flag) mentioned in the Brahma Purana, because Lord Brahma created the universe on this day. It may also represent Indradhvaj (translation: the flag of Indra).[6]
  • Mythologically, the Gudhi symbolizes Lord Rama’s victory and happiness on returning to Ayodhya after slaying Ravana. Since a symbol of victory is always held high, so is the gudhi (flag). It is believed that this festival is celebrated to commemorate the coronation of Rama post his return to Ayodhya after completing 14 years of exile.[6]
  • Gudhi is believed to ward off evil, invite prosperity and good luck into the house.[6]

The Gudhi is positioned on the right side of the main entrance of the house. The right side symbolizes active state of the soul.[2]

Festivities[edit]

Rangoli

On the festive day, courtyards in village houses will be swept clean and plastered with fresh cow-dung. Even in the city, people take the time out to do some spring cleaning. Women and children work on intricate rangoli designs on their doorsteps, the vibrant colours mirroring the burst of colour associated with spring. Everyone dresses up in new clothes and it is a time for family gatherings.

Traditionally, families are supposed to begin the festivities by eating the bittersweet leaves of the neem tree. Sometimes, a paste of neem leaves is prepared and mixed with dhane, gul/gur (known as jaggery in English), and tamarind. All the members of the family consume this paste, which is believed to purify the blood and strengthen the body’s immune system against diseases.

Maharashtrian families also make shrikhand and Poori or Puran Poli on this day. Konkanis make Kanangachi Kheer, a variety of Kheer made of sweet potato, coconut milk, jaggery, rice flour, etc. and Sanna.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "March 2015 Calendar with Holidays". Retrieved 20 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Chaitra Shukla Pratipada (Gudhi Padwa)". Hindu Janajagruti Samiti. 
  3. ^ Gajrani, S. History, Religion and Culture of India. Volume 3. p. 108. 
  4. ^ http://www.sindhunagar.com/chetichand.php
  5. ^ http://www.bawarchi.com/festivals/cheti.html
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Significance of Gudhi Padwa". Hindu Jagriti Samiti. 

External links[edit]