Guildford (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 51°14′46″N 0°33′07″W / 51.246°N 0.552°W / 51.246; -0.552

Guildford
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Guildford in Surrey.
Outline map
Location of Surrey within England.
County Surrey
Electorate 77,517 (December 2010)[1]
Major settlements Guildford, Cranleigh, Worplesdon
Current constituency
Created 1885
Member of Parliament Anne Milton (Conservative)
Number of members One
1295–1885
Number of members 1295–1868: Two
1868–1885: One
Type of constituency Borough constituency
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency South East England

Guildford is a constituency[n 1] in Surrey represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Anne Milton, a Conservative.[n 2]

History[edit]

From the first Commons in the Model Parliament of 1295 Guildford was a parliamentary borough sending two members to Parliament until 1868[2][n 3] and one until 1885. In the latter years of sending two members a bloc vote system of elections was used.

Before 1885 the constituency covered the town of Guildford only.[3] The parliamentary borough was abolished under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 however replaced by a new type of seat, named, Guildford (a county division of Surrey) which covered a much wider geographical area.

Boundaries[edit]

The constituency covers Guildford and the surrounding area in the county of Surrey. After the decision of the Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies which reported for the 2010 general election, the electoral wards had electoral wards:

  • Burpham, Christchurch, Friary and St Nicolas, Holy Trinity, Merrow, Onslow, Pilgrims, Shalford, Stoke, Stoughton, Westborough, Worplesdon in the Borough of Guildford
  • Alfold, Cranleigh Rural and Ellens Green, Blackheath and Wonersh, Cranleigh East, Cranleigh West, Ewhurst, Shamley Green and Cranleigh North in the District of Waverley

Members of Parliament[edit]

MPs 1295–1640[edit]

Parliament First member Second member
1381 Robert atte Mille
1386 John Gatyn Henry Marlborough[4]
1388 (Feb) John Bonet Robert Chesenhale[4]
1388 (Sep) John Thorne Robert Vinter[4]
1390 (Jan) Thomas Brocas Robert Vinter[4]
1390 (Nov)
1391 John Gatyn Robert Vinter[4]
1393 John Thorne Henry Colas[4]
1394
1395 John Gatyn Thomas Brocas[4]
1397 (Jan) John Gatyn John Bonet[4]
1397 (Sep) Robert Chesenhale Robert Vinter[4]
1399 John Gatyn John Bonet[4]
1401 John Gatyn Robert Hornmede[4]
1402 Robert atte Mille John Cross[4]
1404 (Jan) John Gatyn Thomas Brocas[4]
1404 (Oct)
1406 William Gregory Henry Rose[4]
1407 Robert Hull John Wharton[4]
1410
1411
1413 (Feb)
1413 (May) Ralph Wimbledon Richard Eton[4]
1414 (Apr)
1414 (Nov) William Waterman Geoffrey Mudge[4]
1415 Thomas Ingram William Weston[4]
1416 (Mar) John Hipperon Richard Eton[4]
1416 (Oct)
1417 William Walsk John Gregg[4]
1419 John Stoughton William Weston[4]
1420 Richard Woking John Wharton[4]
1421 (May) Thomas Waller John Gregg[4]
1421 (Dec) Thomas Waller Richard Woking[4]
1510-1523 No names known[5]
1529 Sir Thomas Palmer John Dale[5]
1536  ?
1539  ?William Fitzwilliam  ?John Bourne[5]
1542 Sir John Baker William Fitzwilliam[5]
1545 Anthony Browne Thomas Elyot[5]
1547 Sir Anthony Browne Thomas Elyot, died
and repl. by Jan 1552 by
Thomas Stoughton[5]
1553 (Mar)  ?
1553 (Oct) William More William Hammond[5]
1554 (Apr) George Tadlow William Hammond[5]
1554 (Nov) Henry Polsted William More[5]
1555 Henry Polsted William More[5]
1558 Edward Popham William Hammond[5]
1559 Sir Thomas Palmer Thomas Stoughton[6]
1562/3 Thomas Bromley John Austen[6]
1571 Peter Osborne Henry Knollys[6]
1572 William More Thomas Stoughton, died
and repl. Jan 1581 by
Lawrence Stoughton[6]
1584 George More Laurence Stoughton[6]
1586 George More Laurence Stoughton[6]
1588 Sir William More George More[6]
1593 George More Laurence Stoughton[6]
1597 Sir William More I Sir Robert Southwell[6]
1601 Robert More William Jackson[6]
1604 Sir George More George Austen
1614 Sir Robert More George Stoughton
1621 Sir Robert More John Murray
1624 Sir Robert More Nicholas Stoughton
1625 Sir William Morley Robert Parkhurst, jnr
1626 Sir William Morley Robert Parkhurst, jnr
1628 Robert Parkhurst Poynings More
1629–1640 No Parliaments summoned

MPs 1640–1868[edit]

prior to 1868 the constituency was jointly represented by two MPs

Election 1st Member[7] 1st Party 2nd Member[7] 2nd Party
April 1640 Sir Robert Parkhurst Parliamentarian George Abbotts Parliamentarian
November 1640 Sir Robert Parkhurst Parliamentarian George Abbotts Parliamentarian
1645 Sir Robert Parkhurst Parliamentarian Nicholas Stoughton Recruiter
1648  ?  ?
1653 Guildford not represented in Barebones Parliament
1654 Richard Hiller One seat only
1656 Colonel John Hewson One seat only
1659 Carew Raleigh Robert Parkhurst
1660 Richard Onslow Arthur Onslow
1664 Thomas Dalmahoy
March 1679 Richard Onslow Whig
October 1679 Morgan Randyll
1685 Heneage Finch Tory
1689 Foot Onslow John Weston Tory
1690 Morgan Randyll
1701 Denzil Onslow Whig
1705 Robert Wroth
1708 Morgan Randyll
1710 Robert Wroth
1711 Morgan Randyll
1713 Sir Richard Onslow, Bt Whig
1714 Denzil Onslow Whig
1717 Robert Wroth
1720 Arthur Onslow Whig
1722 Thomas Brodrick
1727 Colonel. Richard Onslow
1728 Henry Vincent
1734 Hon. Richard Onslow
1740 by-election Denzil Onslow
1747 Sir John Elwill, Bt
1760 by-election George Onslow
1768 Sir Fletcher Norton
1782 by-election William Norton
1784 Viscount Cranley Whig Chapple Norton
1790 George Holme Sumner Tory
1796 Chapple Norton
1806 Thomas Cranley Onslow Tory George Holme Sumner [n 4] Tory
March 1807 Chapple Norton Whig
1812 Arthur Onslow Tory
1818 William Draper Best Tory
1819 by-election Charles Baring Wall Tory
1826 George Chapple Norton Tory
1830 Charles Baring Wall Tory George Holme Sumner Tory
1831 Charles Francis Norton Whig James Mangles[8] Whig
1832 Charles Baring Wall Tory
1834 Conservative
1837 James Yorke Scarlett Conservative
1841 Ross Donnelly Mangles[9] Whig
1847 Henry Currie Conservative
1852 James Bell Liberal
1857 William Bovill Conservative
1858 by-election Guildford Onslow[10] Liberal
1866 by-election Richard Garth Conservative
1868 Representation reduced to one member

MPs since 1868[edit]

Election Member[7] Party
1868 Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] Liberal
1874 Denzil Roberts Onslow Conservative
1885 St John Brodrick Conservative
1906 William Henry Cowan Liberal
Jan 1910 (William) Edgar Horne Conservative
1922 Henry Cecil Buckingham Conservative
1931 by-election Charles Arthur Uryan Rhys Conservative
1935 Sir John Jarvis, Bt Conservative
1950 Richard Nugent Conservative
1966 David Howell Conservative
1997 Nick St Aubyn Conservative
2001 Sue Doughty Liberal Democrat
2005 Anne Milton Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Anne Milton
Liberal Democrat Kelly-Marie Blundell [1]
Labour Richard Wilson [2]
UKIP Harry Aldridge [3]
General Election 2010: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Anne Milton 29,618 53.3 +9.9
Liberal Democrat Sue Doughty 21,836 39.3 −4.0
Labour Tim Shand 2,812 5.1 −4.8
UKIP Mazhar Manzoor 1,021 1.8 +0.6
Peace John Morris 280 0.5 +0.5
Majority 7,782 14.0
Turnout 55,567 72.1 +5.0
Conservative hold Swing +5.45[n 5]

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Anne Milton 22,595 43.8 +2.4
Liberal Democrat Sue Doughty 22,248 43.1 +0.5
Labour Karen Landles 5,054 9.8 −3.9
Green John Pletts 811 1.6 N/A
UKIP Martin Haslam 645 1.2 −0.3
Peace John Morris 166 0.3 N/A
Independent Victoria Lavin 112 0.2 N/A
Majority 347 0.7
Turnout 51,631 68.3 +5.6
Conservative gain from Liberal Democrat Swing +0.9
General Election 2001: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Democrat Sue Doughty 20,358 42.6 +8.4
Conservative Nick St Aubyn 19,820 41.4 −1.1
Labour Joyce Still 6,558 13.7 −3.8
UKIP Sonya Porter 736 1.5 +0.8
Pacifist Party John Morris 370 0.8 +0.3
Majority 538 1.2
Turnout 47,842 62.7 −11.9
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing +4.7

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Nick St Aubyn 24,230 42.5 −12.8
Liberal Democrat Margaret Sharp 19,439 34.1 +1.3
Labour Joseph Burns 9,945 17.5 +6.1
Referendum Party James Gore 2,650 4.7 N/A
UKIP Robert McWhirter 400 0.7 N/A
Pacifist Party John Morris 294 0.5 N/A
Majority 4,791 8.4
Turnout 56,958 74.6
Conservative hold Swing -7.05[n 6]

This constituency underwent boundary changes between the 1992 and 1997 general elections and thus change in share of vote is based on a notional calculation.

General Election 1992: Guildford[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 33,516 55.3 −0.2
Liberal Democrat Margaret Sharp 20,112 33.1 −0.8
Labour Howard Mann 6,781 11.2 +0.6
Natural Law Alex Stephen Law 234 0.4 N/A
Majority 13,404 22.2 +0.6
Turnout 60,643 78.5 +3.2
Conservative hold Swing +0.3

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 32,504 55.5 +0.4
Social Democrat Margaret Sharp 19,897 33.9 +0.5
Labour Robert John Wolverson 6,216 10.6 −0.1
Majority 12,607 21.6
Turnout 58,617 75.3
Conservative hold Swing −0.05[n 7]
General Election 1983: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 30,016 55.1 −2.2
Social Democrat Margaret Sharp 18,192 33.4 +12.2[n 8]
Labour Keith Chesterton 5,853 10.7 −10.5
Party of Associates with Licensees Anthony Farrell 425 0.8
Majority 11,824 21.7
Turnout 54,486 72.5
Conservative hold Swing -7.2[n 9]

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 31,595 57.3 +8.1
Labour Paul H. Blagbrough 11,689 21.2 −1.4
Liberal Henry Donnelly 11,673 21.2 −7.0
Independent Rhodesian Front Peter G. Scott 232 0.4 +0.4
Majority 19,906 36.1
Turnout 55,189 75.3
Conservative hold Swing +4.75
General Election October 1974: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 25,564 49.2 +0.3
Liberal Christopher Jonathan Fox 14,660 28.2 −3.5
Labour Robert William Harris 11,727 22.6 +3.2
Majority 10,904 21.0
Turnout 51,951 71.9
Conservative hold Swing +1.9[n 10]
General Election February 1974: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 28,152 48.9 −6.5
Liberal Christopher Jonathan Fox 18,261 31.7 +13.7
Labour Jean Elizabeth Crow 11,175 19.4 −7.3
Majority 9,891 17.2
Turnout 57,588 80.4
Conservative hold Swing &minus10.1
General Election 1970: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Howell 27,203 55.4 +5.0
Labour Patton B. Smith 13,108 26.7 −6.2
Liberal Michael J Walton 8,822 18.0 +1.3
Majority 14,095 28.7
Turnout 49,133 72.0
Conservative hold Swing +5.6

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative David Arthur Russell Howell 24,116 50.4 −0.5
Labour Cedric E.H. Thornberry 15,771 32.94 +4.9
Liberal John R Buchanan 7,992 16.69 −4.4
Majority 8,345 17.4
Turnout 78.7
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George R.H. Nugent 24,277 50.9 −6.6
Labour G.E.H. Griffith 13,365 28.0 −1.1
Liberal C.J.N. Martin 10,052 21.1 +7.7
Majority 10,912 22.9
Turnout 78.6
Conservative hold Swing −2.75

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Richard H Nugent 27,198 57.5 -5.7
Labour G.R. 'Bill' Bellerby 13,756 29.1 -7.7
Liberal Arthur R. Braybrooke 6,318 13.4 +13.4
Majority 13,442 28.4
Turnout 80.2
Conservative hold Swing +1.0[n 11]
General Election 1955: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Richard H Nugent 27,113 63.203 -0.04
Labour G.R. Bellerby 15,785 36.797 +0.04
Majority 11,328 26.4
Turnout 76.4
Conservative hold Swing -0.02
General Election 1951: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Richard H Nugent 27,604 63.207 +7.7
Labour VG Wilkinson 16,068 36.793 +2.5
Majority 11,536 26.4
Turnout 79.6
Conservative hold Swing +5.1
General Election 1950: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Richard H Nugent 24,983 55.5 +5.5
Labour V.G. Wilkinson 15,443 34.3 +1.4
Liberal F.H. Philpott 4552 10.12 -7.0
Majority 9540 21.21
Turnout 84.07
Conservative hold Swing

Constituency boundaries were redrawn in time for the 1950 general election. From 1918 to 1950 the west part of Surrey had been represented by three constituencies - Farnham to the west, Chertsey to the north east and Guildford to the south east. The 1950 boundary changes saw the creation of an additional constituency in the west part of Surrey, namely Woking. As a result the constituency of Guildford significantly reduced in size, in both geographically and in population terms. To the south the areas of Godalming, Elstead, Thursley, Whitley, Haslemere and Chiddingford, all of which had previously been part of the constituency of Guildford, were transferred to the constituency of Farnham. To the east the areas of Send, Ripley, Wisley, Ockham, St Martha, Albury, Shere, Clandon and Horsley, all of which had previously been part of the constituency of Guildford, were transferred to the mid Surrey constituency of Dorking.[12]

The boundaries, which emerged in the run up to 1950 general election, namely a constituency centred on the town of Guildford plus an area southwards towards Cranleigh, became, with small changes in subsequent boundary reviews, the basic shape for the constituency of Guildford throughout the later part of the 20th century.

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir John Jarvis 33,091 50.0 -24.9
Labour Vernon George Wilkinson 21,789 32.93 +7.87
Liberal Joseph Gerald Curie Ruston 11,281 17.1 +17.1
Majority 11,302 17.1
Turnout 74.9
Conservative hold Swing -16.4

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General Election 1935: Guildford[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir John Jarvis 35,384 74.9
Labour FA Campbell 11,833 25.06
Majority 23,551 49.88
Turnout 69.27
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Guildford[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles AU Rhys 39,008 86.21
Labour S Peck 6,242 13.79
Majority 32,766 72.41
Turnout 72.26
Conservative hold Swing
By-election 1931: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles AU Rhys unopposed
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929: Guildford[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Buckingham 20,550 48.3
Liberal Somerset Stopford Brooke 15,984 37.6
Labour LM Worsnop 5,996 14.1
Majority 4,566 10.7
Turnout 72.1
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1924: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Buckingham 18,273 62.3
Labour SF Markham 6,227 21.2
Liberal S Parnell Kerr 4,842 16.5
Majority 12,046 41.1
Turnout 71.3
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1923: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Buckingham 14,117 52.3
Liberal SP Kerr 7,601 28.2
Labour William Bennett 5,260 19.5
Majority 6,516 24.2
Turnout 67.6
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1922: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Buckingham 18,045 70.6
Labour William Bennett 7,514 29.4
Majority 10,531 41.2
Turnout 65.4
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General Election 1918: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Edgar Horne 13,149 72.1
Labour W Bennett 5,078 27.9
Majority 8,071 44.3
Turnout 50.0
Conservative hold Swing

Constituency boundaries were redrawn in time for the 1918 general election. From 1885 to 1918 the west part of Surrey had been represented by two constituencies - the north part of west Surrey was the constituency of Chertsey, the south part the constituency of Guildford. Boundary changes in the run up to the 1918 general election resulted in an increase from two to three in the of the number of constituencies in west Surrey - Farnham to the west, Chertsey to the north east and Guildford to the south east.

As a result of these boundary changes, the constituency of Guildford lost the areas of Ash, Normandy, Seale, Frensham and Farnham, towards its west, but to the east gained the areas of Merrow, Send, Ripley, Ockham, Wisley, Clandon and Horsley; all of which had previously been part of the constituency of Chertsey.[16]

General Election December 1910: Guildford[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Edgar Horne 8,463 63.7
Liberal AJ Davey 4,832 36.3
Majority 3,631 27.3
Turnout
Conservative hold Swing
A. Methuen
General Election January 1910: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Sir Edgar Horne 9,264 64.80
Liberal Algernon Methuen 5,033 35.20
Majority 4,231 29.6
Turnout
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

Henry Cowan
General Election January 1906: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal William Henry Cowan 6,430 53.3
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick 5,630 46.7
Majority 800 6.6
Turnout
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
By-election 1900: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick unopposed
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1900: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick 5,816 61.7
Liberal AW Chapman 3,609 38.3
Majority 2,207 23.4
Turnout
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

General Election 1895: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick unopposed
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1892: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick 5,191 58.3
Liberal GPC Lawrence 3,720 41.7
Majority 1471 16.5
Turnout
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

General Election 1886: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick unopposed
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1885: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William St John Fremantle Brodrick 4,485 54.5
Liberal ED Gosling 3,750 45.5
Majority 735 8.9
Turnout
Conservative hold Swing

Constituency boundaries were redrawn in time for the 1885 general election. From 1868 to 1885 the west part of Surrey had been represented by two constituencies, one known as Guildford (which consisted of the town centre of Guildford and little else) and one constituency known as Surrey Western, which comprised the rest of that part of the county of Surrey. The Guildford constituency was both geographically and in size of electorate significantly smaller than the Surrey Western constituency. The 1885 to 1918 constituency boundaries saw the area of west Surrey divided into two constituencies more equal in size of population and land area. The north part of west Surrey was given the constituency name Chertsey, the south part Guildford.[18]

General Election 1880: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Denzil Roberts Onslow 705 55.3
Liberal TR Kemp 571 44.7
Majority 134 10.5
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1870s[edit]

General Election 1874: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Denzil Roberts Onslow 673 61.0
Liberal Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] 430 39.0
Majority 243 22.0
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing

Elections in the 1860s[edit]

General Election 1868: Guildford
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] 536 51.0
Conservative Richard Garth 515 49.0
Majority 21 2.0

Constituency boundaries were redrawn in time for the 1868 election.

Prior to the 1868 general election, the constituency of Guildford was represented by two Members of Parliament. That was reduced to one from 1868 onwards.

The 1868 to 1885 constituency known as Guildford was geographically limited to an area around the current centre of Guildford town. This is in marked contrast to the various post-1885 versions of the constituency known as Guildford all of which have had a much greater geographical area. The 1868 constituency was, at its maximum, little over one mile east to west, and just over one mile north to south.[20] (Most of the area which is in the modern constituency of Guildford would in 1868 have been part of the Surrey Western Constituency, rather than the Guildford Constituency.)

Guildford by-election 17 December 1866
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Richard Garth 339
Liberal WW Pocock 301
Majority 38
Conservative hold Swing

The 17 December 1866 by-election was caused by W Bovill resigning as an MP following his appointment to judicial office, namely Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas.

Guildford by-election 11 July 1866
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Bovill 316
Liberal HL Long 11
Majority 305
Conservative hold Swing

The 11 July 1866 by-election resulted from the need of W Bovill to seek reelection upon his appointment as Solicitor-General.

General Election 1865: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] 333
Conservative William Bovill 318
Liberal WW Pocock 228
Majority 90
Liberal hold Swing
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1850s[edit]

Party designations for many candidates during the 1830s, 1840s and 1850s can be problematic as party ties were not as strong as those that developed, in Britain, in the late 19th century. Therefore for the 1830s to 1850s election results, listed below, the term Liberal includes Whigs and Radicals; and the term Conservative includes Tories and Peelites.

General Election 1859: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] unopposed
Conservative William Bovill unopposed
Liberal hold Swing
Conservative hold Swing
Guildford by-election 22 October 1858
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Guildford James Hillier Onslow[10] 268
Conservative WJ Evelyn 239
Majority 29
Liberal hold Swing

The 22 October 1858 by-election was caused by RD Mangles resigning as an MP following his appointment as Member of the Council of India.

General Election 1857: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Ross Donnelly Mangles 349
Conservative William Bovill 338
Liberal James Bell 167
Majority 171
Liberal hold Swing
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
General Election 1852: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Ross Donnelly Mangles 370
Liberal James Bell 251
Conservative TL Thurlow 244
Majority 7
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
Liberal hold Swing

Elections in the 1840s[edit]

General Election 1847: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Henry Currie 366
Liberal Ross Donnelly Mangles 242
Conservative TL Thurlow 184
Majority 58
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
Liberal hold Swing
General Election 1841: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Ross Donnelly Mangles 242
Liberal Charles Baring Wall 221
Conservative James Yorke Scarlett 177
Conservative Henry Currie 161
Majority 44
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1830s[edit]

General Election 1837: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Baring Wall 252
Conservative James Yorke Scarlett 188
Liberal James Mangles 159
Majority 29
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1835: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal James Mangles 299
Conservative Charles Baring Wall 214
Liberal HAC Austen 131
Majority 83
Liberal hold Swing
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1832: Guildford (top 2 candidates elected)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal James Mangles 299
Tory Charles Baring Wall 180
Liberal Charles Francis Norton 138
Majority 42
Liberal hold Swing
Tory gain from Liberal Swing

Constituency boundaries were redrawn in time for the 1832 general election.[23]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
  3. ^ To the House of Commons of England until 1708, then to the House of Commons of Great Britain until 1801, and to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom until 1885.
  4. ^ At the 1806 general election, two Tories were returned: Onslow and Sumner. However, a petition was lodged, and on 16 March 1807 Sumner's election was overturned in favour of the 3rd-placed candidate, the Whig Chapple Norton
  5. ^ Lib Dem to Con
  6. ^ Due to ward changes somewhat notional (Con-Lib Dem) swing and (Con-Lab) was higher: -9.45
  7. ^ Con to Lib
  8. ^ Notional, based on pact kept here for Liberals to field candidates, pre-merger in forming the Liberal Democrats
  9. ^ Notional Con to SDP swing, most of this swing was Lab and Lib to SDP, shown by the single party swing of -2.2%
  10. ^ Again mostly an opposite sign swing caused by a larger other two-party swing. Here: Lib to Lab
  11. ^ Theoretical Con-Lab swing but wiped out by gains from an additional opponent party, a Liberal
References
  1. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  2. ^ Reform Act 1867: representation reduced to one seat with effect from the 1868 general election.
  3. ^ Map Boundary Commission VisionofBritain
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2011-10-29. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2011-10-29. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "History of Parliament". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2011-10-29. 
  7. ^ a b c Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "G" (part 2)[self-published source][better source needed]
  8. ^ For political affiliation see Stoke next Guildford pp57-8, 1999 edition, author Lyn Clark, publisher Phillimore.
  9. ^ For political affiliation see Stoke next Guildford p58, 1999 edition, author Lyn Clark, publisher Phillimore which refers to Ross Donnelly (son of James Mangles MP 1831-1837) as being the Liberal MP from 1841-1858. Elsewhere on Wikipedia at Liberal Party (UK) the traditional starting date for the Liberal Party is taken to be 1859, although the term Liberal had been used since at least the 1830s to describe Whig and/or Radical politicians. Consistent with 1859 being referred to as the traditional start date of the Liberal Party, Ross Donnelly Mangles has herein been referred to as a Whig, rather than a Liberal. There is further information about Ross Donnelly Mangles' life and family background at Descendants of William Mangles and in the ODNB article by Katherine Prior, ‘Mangles, Ross Donnelly (1801–1877)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 3 Oct 2010.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g For political affiliation see Guildford p180, 1982 edition, author ER Chamberlin, publisher Phillimore.
  11. ^ "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 2010-12-06. 
  12. ^ For 1918 to 1950 constituency see http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1917/Surrey_1917, for 1950 to 1955 constituency see http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1900s/Great_Britain_Sheet2
  13. ^ http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/ge35/i09.htm
  14. ^ http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/ge31/i09.htm
  15. ^ 1918-1929 results see British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949 FWS Craig
  16. ^ See http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1917/Surrey_1917 for map of constituencies used in 1918 and compare to http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1885/Surrey_1885 for map of 1885-1918 constituncies.
  17. ^ 1885-1910 results see British Parliamentary Results 1885-1918 FWS Craig
  18. ^ For 1868 constituency boundary maps see http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1868/Guildford_1868 For 1885 to 1918 constituency boundary map see http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1885/Surrey_1885. For the size of each constituency's electorate see British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 and 1885-1918 by FWS Craig.
  19. ^ For 1868-1880 results see British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, FWS Craig
  20. ^ The boundary ran roughly from just west of Guildford Railway Station, to Cross Lanes in the east. See http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1868/Guildford_1868 for further details.
  21. ^ For 1857-1866 elections see Britsih Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, FWS Craig
  22. ^ For 1832 to 1852 election results see British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, FWS Craig
  23. ^ See http://vision.port.ac.uk/maps/sheet/bc_reports_1868/Guildford_1868 for 1832 constituency boundaries.

Sources[edit]