Guitalele

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Guitalele
Other names Guitarlele
Classification String instrument
Related instruments

A guitalele (sometimes spelled guitarlele or guilele) is a guitar-ukulele hybrid,[1] that is, "a 1/4 size" guitar, a cross between a classical guitar and a tenor ukulele.[2] The guitalele combines the portability of a ukulele, due to its small size, with the six single strings and resultant chord possibilities of a classical guitar. It may include a built-in microphone that permits playing the guitalele either as an acoustic guitar or connected to an amplifier. The guitalele is variously marketed (and used) as a travel guitar or children's guitar.[3]

A guitalele is the size of a ukulele, and is played like a bass pitched up to “A” (that is, up a 4th, or like a guitar with a capo on the fifth fret). This gives it tuning of ADGCEA, with the top four strings tuned like a low G ukulele.[4]

Several guitar and ukulele manufacturers market guitaleles, including Yamaha Corporation's GL-1 Guitalele,[5][6] Cordoba's Guilele,[7] Koaloha's D-VI 6-string tenor ukelele,[8] Mele's Guitarlele,[9] and Kanilea's GL6 Guitarlele.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Boyle, Theresa. (May 13, 2004) Toronto Star Students' old drums pail by comparison; Grant buys school new instruments No more need to pound on buckets. Section: News; Page B3.
  2. ^ Constable, Anne. (April 19, 2008) The Santa Fe New Mexican The sweet sound of success: Musician's song to daughter finds fans on line and a record deal.
  3. ^ Anderton, Craig (July 1, 2002). "Guitar Player". Freaks of Frankfurt 36 (7). p. 27. 
  4. ^ "Guitarlele | Ukulele Review". Ukulelehunt.com. Retrieved 2012-03-08. 
  5. ^ Nikkei Weekly (December 22, 1997) Small guitar can be amplified. Section: New products, science & Technology. Page 10.
  6. ^ "GL1". Yamaha.ca. Retrieved 2012-09-11. 
  7. ^ Cordoba Guilele, cordoba.com (accessed 9 July 2013).
  8. ^ Koaloha D-VI, koaloha.com (accessed 9 July 2013).
  9. ^ Mele Spruce Top Guitarlele, Mele Ukelele (accessed 9 July 2013).
  10. ^ Kanilea Guitarlele, Kanilea Ukelele (accessed 9 July 2013).