Gumbaynggirr

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Gumbaynggir (also 'Kumbainggar') are an Australian Aboriginal group of the Coffs Harbour, New South Wales area. The Gumbaynggirr lands cover an area of the Mid North Coast from the Nambucca River to as far north as the Clarence River (Grafton), west to Armidale and eastward to the Pacific coast, making the Gumbaynggirr tribe one of the largest in NSW.[1] Evidence indicates people have lived in the area for many thousands of years.

Their neighbours to the south are the Dunghutti (Kempsey), to the north, the Bundjalung (Byron Bay area) and to the west, the Ngarabal (Glen Innes) and Nganyaywana (Anaiwan) (Armidale).[2]

History[edit]

Clement Hodgkinson was the first European to make contact with the local Aboriginal community when he explored the upper reaches of the Nambucca and Bellinger Rivers in March 1841.

The Gumbaynggir are an active people who recently represented themselves at the "New Way" Sovereignty Summit Canberra Conference convened by 1972 Tent Embassy. Four last living Leaders and Gumilaroi elected Sovereign Spokesman Michael Anderson.[disambiguation needed][3] '

Language[edit]

Main article: Kumbainggar language

Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative began in 1986, when Gumbaynggirr elders got together to revive their language and hand it down. Muurrbay means 'white fig tree' in the Gumbaynggirr language. The centre does research and teaches the language in the surrounding areas, its aim being to help revive and strengthen traditions, culture and self-esteem through language.[4]

Current Population[edit]

Today current Gumbaynggirr population stand between 10.000 is one of the largest population Current Aboriginal population in the area of this tribe is about 18.000

People[edit]

Aden Ridgeway, who served as an Australian Senator from 1999 to 2005, is a Gumbaynggirr man.

Tyrone Sheather, a young emerging filmmaker and artist is of Gumbaynggirr descent.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.bowraville.org.au/gumbaynggirr.htm
  2. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ http://www.muurrbay.org.au/