Gummy shark

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Gummy shark
Mustelus antarcticus1.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Chondrichthyes
Subclass: Elasmobranchii
Superorder: Selachimorpha
Order: Carcharhiniformes
Family: Triakidae
Genus: Mustelus
Species: M. antarcticus
Binomial name
Mustelus antarcticus
Günther, 1870
Gummy Shark.png
Distribution of the gummy shark

The gummy shark, Mustelus antarcticus, is a shark in the family Triakidae. It is a slender, grey shark with white spots along the body and flat, plate-like teeth for crushing its prey. It has a maximum length of between 157 cm (male) and 175 cm (female). It feeds on crustaceans, marine worms, small fish, and cephalopods. Gummy sharks are found in the waters around southern Australia, from Shark Bay in Western Australia to Port Stephens in New South Wales, from the surface down to a depth of 350 m. The reproduction of gummy sharks is ovoviviparous.

Gummy shark meat is often marketed as "flake". Their boneless fillets have made them particularly popular within the fish and chip industry throughout Australia. Although gummy sharks have not been overfished, they inhabit many of the same areas as school (snapper) sharks which have an established bycatch quota. This means fishers targeting gummy shark can not have an adverse impact on the school shark population.[1] Bag limits for recreational fishers in Victoria apply, a limit of two gummy shark and/or school shark, landed whole or as a carcass. Minimum size for both species is 45 cm measured from the rear-most gill slit to the base of the tail fin.[2]

This gummy shark was caught at Hastings, Western Point, Victoria, using cured eel bait.

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