Gun laws in South Dakota

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Gun laws in South Dakota regulate the sale, possession, and use of firearms and ammunition in the state of South Dakota in the United States.[1][2]

Subject/Law Long Guns Handguns Relevant Statutes Notes
Permit to purchase required? No No
Firearm registration? No No
Owner license required? No No
Carry permits issued? No Yes SD 23-7-7 South Dakota is a "shall issue" state for concealed carry.
Open carry permitted? Yes Yes Open carry is generally permitted. For open carry in a vehicle, the firearm must be clearly visible.
State preemption of local restrictions? Yes Yes
"Assault weapon" law? No No
Magazine Capacity Restriction? No No
NFA weapons restricted? No No
Location of South Dakota in the United States

South Dakota is a "shall issue" state for concealed carry. The local county sheriff shall issue a permit to carry a concealed pistol to qualified applicants. A temporary permit shall be issued within five days of the application. Concealed carry is not permitted at an elementary or secondary school, in a courthouse, or in any establishment that derives over half of its income from the sale of alcoholic beverages. For non-residents, South Dakota recognizes valid concealed carry permits from any other state.[3][4][5][6]

Open carry is legal in South Dakota and does not require a concealed pistol permit. Firearms may be transported in vehicles if they are clearly visible.

When buying a handgun from a Federal Firearms License (FFL) holder, an application to purchase a handgun must be filled out by the buyer and submitted to the local police by the seller. Beginning June 1, 2009, anyone who passes the federal background check will be able to take possession of any firearm immediately, per SB0070.[7]

South Dakota has state preemption of firearms laws. Units of local government may not restrict the possession, transportation, sale, transfer, ownership, manufacture, or repair of firearms or ammunition or their components.[8] Firearms manufacturers, distributors, and sellers are not liable for injury caused by the use of firearms.[1]

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