Guo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Guo (surname))
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the Chinese surname. For other uses, see Guo (disambiguation).
"Kwok" redirects here. For the cooking pot, see wok.
Guo
郭姓 - 楷體.svg
Guo surname in regular script
Pronunciation Guō (Pinyin)
Kueh, Kok (Pe̍h-ōe-jī)
Language(s) Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean
Origin
Language(s) Old Chinese
Other names
Variant(s) Guo, Kuo (Mandarin)
Kwok, Guok (Cantonese)
Gue, Kue, Koay, Quek (Hokkien, Teochew)
Quách (Vietnamese)
Kwak (Korean)
Derivative(s) Quach, Kwak

"Guo", written in Chinese: , is one of the most common Chinese surnames and means "the wall that surrounds outside a city" in Chinese; it can also be spelled Cok, Guo, Quo, Quoc, Quach, Quock, Que, Quek, Kuo, Kok, Koc, Kwek, Kwok, Kwak (Korean), Kuok, Kuek, Gock, Koay or Ker. The different way of spelling of this surname indicates the origin of the family. For example, "Kwok" is Cantonese originated in Hong Kong and surrounding area. It is the 18th most common family name in China. The name Guo was noted as far back as the Xia Dynasty. There are eight legendary origins for the Guo surname. Among them, three are foreign. They are Persian (Hui), Korean, and Mongolian, as a result of sinicization. These are only minority. The majority of people bearing this surname are descended from Han Chinese.

Origins[edit]

Hui Surname[edit]

The Guo family is one of the well known Hui clans around Quanzhou in Fujian, the other being the Ding family, they are examples of these Hui who identify as Muslim by nationality but do not practice Islam. Due to more people of these clans identifying as Hui the population of Hui as grown.[1][2] All these clans needed were only evidence of ancestry from Arab, or Persian, or other Muslim ancestors to be recognized as Hui, and they do not need to practice Islam.[3] It was the Communist party and its policies which encouraged the definition of Hui as a nationality or ethnicity.[4][5] The Chinese Government's Historic Artifacts Bureau preserved tombs of Arabs and Persians whom Hui are descended from around Quanzhou.[6] Many of these Hui worship village gods and do not have Islam as their religion, some are Buddhists, Daoists, followers of Chinese Folk Religions, secularists, and Christians.[7] Many clans with thousands of members in numerous villages across Fujian recorded their genealogies and had Muslim ancestry.[8] These Hui clans originating in Fujian have strong sense of unity among their members, despite being scattered across a wide area in Asia, such as Fujian, Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia, and Philippines.[9][10]

On Taiwan, there are also descendants of Hui who came with Koxinga who no longer observe Islam, the Taiwan branch of the Guo (romanized as Kuo in Taiwan) family is not Muslim, but still does not offer pork at ancestral shrines. The Chinese Muslim Association counts these people as Muslims.[11] The Taiwan Guo now view their Hui identity as irrelevant and don't assert that they are Hui.[12]

Various different accounts are given as to whom the Hui Guo clan is descended from. Several of the Guo claimed descent from Han chinese General Guo Ziyi.[13] They were then were distressed and disturbed at the fact that their claim of descent from Guo Ziyi contradicted their being Hui, which required foreign ancestry.[14] Encyclopædia Iranica claims the ancestor of the Guo clan in Baiqi was the Persian Ebn Tur (Daqqaq).[15]

Some famous Chinese people with "郭" as the surname[edit]

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Guo.

Historical Figure[edit]

  • Guo Jia Official and Adviser under Warlord Cao Cao
  • Guo Yi Son of Guo Jia Official of Cao Wei
  • Guo Huai Military General of Cao Wei
  • Guo Ziyi (697 – 781), general of Tang China who ended the Anshi Rebellion
  • Guo Kan, a famed Chinese general that served under the Mongols.

Mondern Figure[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gladney, Dru C. (2004). Dislocating China: reflections on Muslims, minorities and other subaltern subjects. C. Hurst & Co. Publishers. p. 294. ISBN 1-85065-324-0. 
  2. ^ Robert W. Hefner (1998). Market cultures: society and morality in the new Asian capitalisms. Westview Press. p. 113. ISBN 0-8133-3360-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  3. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1996). Muslim Chinese: ethnic nationalism in the People's Republic. Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard Univ Asia Center. p. 286. ISBN 0-674-59497-5. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  4. ^ Michael Dillon (1999). China's Muslim Hui community: migration, settlement and sects. Richmond: Curzon Press. p. 2. ISBN 0-7007-1026-4. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  5. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1996). Muslim Chinese: ethnic nationalism in the People's Republic. Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard Univ Asia Center. p. 272. ISBN 0-674-59497-5. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  6. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1996). Muslim Chinese: ethnic nationalism in the People's Republic. Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard Univ Asia Center. p. 266. ISBN 0-674-59497-5. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  7. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1998). Making majorities: constituting the nation in Japan, Korea, China, Malaysia, Fiji, Turkey, and the United States. Stanford University Press. p. 112. ISBN 0-8047-3048-2. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  8. ^ Chibli Mallat, Jane Frances Connors, University of London. Centre of Middle Eastern Studies (1990). Islamic family law. BRILL. p. 364. ISBN 1-85333-301-8. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  9. ^ Jean C. Oi, Andrew George Walder (1999). Property rights and economic reform in China. Stanford University Press. p. 62. ISBN 0-8047-3788-6. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  10. ^ Jean C. Oi, Andrew George Walder (1999). Property rights and economic reform in China. Stanford University Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-8047-3788-6. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  11. ^ Peter G. Gowing (July–August 1970). "Islam in Taiwan". SAUDI ARAMCO World. 
  12. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1991). Muslim Chinese: ethnic nationalism in the People's Republic (2, illustrated, reprint ed.). Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University. p. 279. ISBN 0-674-59495-9. Retrieved 2010-06-28. [1]
  13. ^ Dru C. Gladney (1991). Muslim Chinese: ethnic nationalism in the People's Republic (2, illustrated, reprint ed.). Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University. p. 279. ISBN 0-674-59495-9. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  14. ^ Bettina Gransow, Pál Nyíri, Shiaw-Chian Fong (2005). China: new faces of ethnography (illustrated ed.). Lit Verlag. p. 126. ISBN 3-8258-8806-1. Retrieved 2010-06-28. 
  15. ^ [2]