Gus Mortson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gus Mortson
Gus Mortson 1944.png
Mortson at St. Michaels College, c. 1944
Born (1925-01-24) January 24, 1925 (age 90)
New Liskeard, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Defense
Shot Left
Played for Toronto Maple Leafs
Chicago Black Hawks
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 1945–1967

James Angus Gerald "Old Hardrock" Mortson (born January 24, 1925) is a Canadian former ice hockey defenceman in the National Hockey League. He played for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Chicago Black Hawks, and Detroit Red Wings, winning four Stanley Cups with Toronto. He also played in eight NHL All Star games.

Early career[edit]

Mortson grew up in Northern Ontario. He joined the St. Michael's Majors of the Ontario Hockey Association Jr. league in 1943–44 and played two seasons for them. He then turned professional and played for the United States Hockey League's Tulsa Oilers in 1945–46, compiling 48 points in 51 games.[1]

National Hockey League[edit]

In 1946–47 Mortson joined the NHL's Toronto Maple Leafs, where he played for the next six seasons. He and fellow defenceman Jim Thomson were known as the "Gold Dust Twins", and the two helped the Maple Leafs win Stanley Cups in 1947, 1948, 1949, and 1951. In the 1948 All Star game, Mortson and Gordie Howe squared off in an All-Star Game and, as of 2015, are the only players to fight in an NHL All-Star Game.[2] In 1950, Mortson was named to the league's first all-star team.[1]

In 1952 Mortson was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks, along with Cal Gardner, Ray Hannigan, and Al Rollins, for Harry Lumley. Mortson played for the Black Hawks for six seasons. In 1956–57 he led the league in penalty minutes for the fourth time. He was then traded to the Detroit Red Wings in 1958 and played one season for them.[1] Morton played 797 games and had 198 points and 1,380 penalty minutes in his 13-year NHL career.[1] He was known for his physical play and got into numerous fights.[3]

Later career[edit]

After his NHL career ended, Mortson played for several minor league teams, including the American Hockey League's Buffalo Bisons. He retired in 1967.[1]

Awards and achievements[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1942–43 Kirkland Lake Lakers GBHL
1943–44 Toronto St. Michael's Majors OHA-Jr. 25 5 11 16 16 12 2 2 4 12
1943–44 Oshawa Generals M-Cup 8 1 4 5 4
1944–45 Toronto St. Michael's Majors OHA-Jr. 17 6 12 18 18 6 1 5 6 8
1944–45 Toronto St. Michael's Majors M-Cup 14 6 4 10 12
1945–46 Tulsa Oilers USHL 51 19 29 48 47 13 1 5 6 12
1946–47 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 60 5 13 18 133 11 1 3 4 22
1947–48 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 58 7 11 18 118 5 1 2 3 2
1948–49 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 60 2 13 15 85 9 2 1 3 8
1949–50 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 68 3 14 17 125 7 0 0 0 18
1950–51 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 60 3 10 13 142 11 0 1 1 4
1951–52 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 65 1 10 11 106 4 0 0 0 8
1952–53 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 68 5 18 23 88 7 1 1 2 6
1953–54 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 68 5 13 18 132
1954–55 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 65 2 11 13 133
1955–56 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 52 5 10 15 87
1956–57 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 5 18 23 147
1957–58 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 67 3 10 13 62
1958–59 Detroit Red Wings NHL 36 0 1 1 22
1958–59 Buffalo Bisons AHL 29 3 9 12 46 11 3 3 6 12
1959–60 Buffalo Bisons AHL 72 10 32 42 37
1962–63 Chatham Maroons OHA-Sr. 36 11 14 25 46 9 1 1 2 6
1963–64 Chatham Maroons IHL 29 2 14 16 60
1964–65 Oakville Oaks OHA-Sr. 31 7 18 25 78 11 1 5 6 18
1964–65 Buffalo Bisons AHL 3 0 3 3 0
1965–66 Oakville Oaks OHA-Sr. 27 7 15 22 48 7 0 2 2 2
1966–67 Oakville Oaks OHA-Sr. 13 3 3 6 8
NHL totals 797 46 152 198 1380 54 5 8 13 68

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Gus Mortson". legendsofhockey.net. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  2. ^ http://redwings.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=630635
  3. ^ Meharg, Bruce (2005). Legends of the Leafs. Author House. pp. 152–154.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bill Gadsby
Chicago Black Hawks captain
195457
Succeeded by
Ed Litzenberger