Guy Carbonneau

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Guy Carbonneau
GuyCarbonneauSept2007.JPG
Born (1960-03-18) March 18, 1960 (age 54)
Sept-Îles, QC, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
St. Louis Blues
Dallas Stars
NHL Draft 44th overall, 1979
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1980–2000

Joseph Harry Guy Carbonneau (born March 18, 1960) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey player in the National Hockey League. He was also the president of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League Chicoutimi Saguenéens.

Playing career[edit]

Carbonneau started his hockey career in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League with the Chicoutimi Saguenéens. After an impressive 182 points season with the Sagueneens, Carbonneau was drafted 44th overall in the 1980 NHL Entry Draft by the Montreal Canadiens.

Succeding his mentor Bob Gainey in the role of defensive forward, Carbonneau's strong play earned him three Frank J. Selke Trophy wins in 1987–88, 1988–89, and 1991–92, the second-most Selke Trophies after Gainey who had won four. Carbonneau helped the Canadiens to a Stanley Cup championship in 1985–86. In 1989–90, he was named the captain of the Canadiens, and led them to another Stanley Cup win in 1992–93 against Wayne Gretzky and the Los Angeles Kings.

On August 19, 1994, he was traded to the St. Louis Blues in exchange for Jim Montgomery. He played there for one season before moving to the Dallas Stars, under general manager Bob Gainey. There, he was part of the Stars' two consecutive Presidents Trophy wins in 1998 and 1999 for the best regular season record. He won his third Stanley Cup in 1998–99 with the Stars, as they defeated the Buffalo Sabres in six games. Next season, Carbonneau and the Stars reached the Stanley Cup Finals again but this time they lost to the New Jersey Devils in six games, afterward he retired at the conclusion of the series.

Carbonneau was one of the more popular Canadiens; fans chanted "Guy, Guy, Guy!" whenever he touched the puck, much as they did for Guy Lafleur (with whom Carbonneau played from 1982–85) during his career. He was also one of the most admired Dallas Stars players. Holding the team captaincy of the Stars at the time, he took the ceremonial opening faceoff when his team played the Canadiens at the last game at the Montreal Forum.

In 2005, the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League created the Guy Carbonneau Trophy (Trophée Guy Carbonneau), awarded annually to the player in the QMJHL judged to be the best defensive forward.

Post-playing career[edit]

After serving as an assistant coach to Michel Therrien with the Canadiens from 2000 to 2002, Carbonneau moved back to the Dallas Stars where he worked as an assistant General Manager until his return to Montreal in January 2006, rejoining his friend and mentor Bob Gainey.

On January 14, 2006, Guy Carbonneau became the Montreal Canadiens associate coach as Claude Julien was fired and GM Bob Gainey assumed the role of interim head coach. Carbonneau then took over as head coach, after the Canadiens were eliminated from the playoffs, becoming the 28th coach in franchise history.

In the 2007-08 season, the team's 99th, Carbonneau led the Canadiens to the best regular season record in the Eastern Conference, earning their first conference title since 1989 and first division title since 1992. In the playoffs, his team defeated the Boston Bruins in 7 games and were eliminated by the Philadelphia Flyers in 5 games. On April 30, 2008, he was nominated for the Jack Adams Award as head coach of the year but lost by 12 voting points to Washington Capitals coach Bruce Boudreau.[1] In the summer of 2008, Carbonneau signed a three-year contract extension. [1]

Carbonneau continued on as head coach for the team's 2008–09 Montreal Canadiens season, which was their 100th season (centennial). Carbonneau was named an assistant coach to Claude Julien, his predecessor as Canadiens head coach and now in the same capacity with the Boston Bruins, at the All-Star game in Montreal on January 25. On March 9, 2009, he was fired as head coach with 16 games left in the regular season and was replaced by general manager Bob Gainey, who claimed that the team needed a new direction. The team had won just 3 of 15 games before the all-star game, putting their playoff position in jeopardy, due to injuries to key players. However the team then rebounded to win 5 of 7 games, including Carbonneau's last game at Dallas before his dismissal. The Canadiens went 1-1-2 under Gainey, with Bell Centre fans chanted "Car-bo! Car-bo!" in support of the recently fired Carbonneau, and ending up finished 8th in the conference followed by a first round playoff sweep by the Boston Bruins. [2][2]

On September 17, 2009, Carbonneau joined on as an analyst for CBC Sports Hockey Night in Canada.[3]

Carbonneau left CBC after the 2009–2010 season and joined Réseau des sports as an analyst.[4]

Carbonneau also appeared in the first season (2010) of La série Montréal-Québec, as the head coach for the Montreal team.[5]

On February 7, 2011, Carbonneau became head coach of the Chicoutimi Saguenéens, the team he co-owns.[6] He resigned in July.

Awards and achievements[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

Playing career[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1976–77 Chicoutimi Saguenéens QMJHL 59 9 20 29 8 4 1 0 1 0
1977–78 Chicoutimi Saguenéens QMJHL 70 28 55 83 60
1978–79 Chicoutimi Saguenéens QMJHL 72 62 79 141 47 4 2 1 3 4
1979–80 Chicoutimi Saguenéens QMJHL 72 72 110 182 6 12 9 15 24 28
1979–80 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 2 1 1 2 2
1980–81 Montreal Canadiens NHL 2 0 1 1 0
1980–81 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 78 35 53 88 87 6 1 3 4 9
1981–82 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 77 27 67 94 124 9 2 7 9 8
1982–83 Montreal Canadiens NHL 77 18 29 47 68 3 0 0 0 2
1983–84 Montreal Canadiens NHL 78 24 30 54 75 15 4 3 7 12
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 79 23 34 57 43 12 4 3 7 8
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 20 36 56 57 20 7 5 12 35
1986–87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 79 18 27 45 68 17 3 8 11 20
1987–88 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 17 21 38 61 11 0 4 4 2
1988–89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 79 26 30 56 44 21 4 5 9 10
1989–90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 68 19 36 55 37 11 2 3 5 6
1990–91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 78 20 24 44 63 13 1 5 6 10
1991–92 Montreal Canadiens NHL 72 18 21 39 39 11 1 1 2 6
1992–93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 61 4 13 17 20 20 3 3 6 10
1993–94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 79 14 24 38 48 7 1 3 4 4
1994–95 St. Louis Blues NHL 42 5 11 16 16 7 1 2 3 6
1995–96 Dallas Stars NHL 71 8 15 23 38
1996–97 Dallas Stars NHL 73 5 16 21 36 7 0 1 1 6
1997–98 Dallas Stars NHL 77 7 17 24 40 16 3 1 4 6
1998–99 Dallas Stars NHL 74 4 12 16 31 17 2 4 6 6
1999–00 Dallas Stars NHL 69 10 6 16 36 23 2 4 6 12
NHL totals 1318 260 403 663 820 231 38 55 93 161

Coaching career[edit]

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L OTL Pts Finish W L Win % Result
Montreal Canadiens 2006–07 82 42 34 6 90 4th in Northeast Missed playoffs
2007–08 82 47 25 10 104 1st in Northeast 5 7 45 W 4–3 over BOS
L 4–1 to PHI
2008–09 66 35 24 7 77 2nd in Northeast (93 pts.) (Fired before end of season)
Total 230 124 83 23 271 5 7 45

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bob Gainey
Montreal Canadiens captain
198994
with Chris Chelios, 1989–90
Succeeded by
Kirk Muller
Preceded by
Bob Gainey
(interim)
Head coach of the Montreal Canadiens
200609
Succeeded by
Bob Gainey
(interim)
Preceded by
Dave Poulin
Winner of the Frank J. Selke Trophy
1988
1989
Succeeded by
Rick Meagher
Preceded by
Dirk Graham
Winner of the Frank J. Selke Trophy
1992
Succeeded by
Doug Gilmour