Gwanggyosan

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Gwanggyosan
Gwanggyosan from Hwaseong.JPG
Gwanggyosan seen from Hwaseong, Suwon
Elevation 582 m (1,909 ft)
Prominence 582 m (1,909 ft)
Location
Location South Korea
Range Gwanggyosan Range
Coordinates 37°20′41″N 127°02′02″E / 37.34472°N 127.03389°E / 37.34472; 127.03389Coordinates: 37°20′41″N 127°02′02″E / 37.34472°N 127.03389°E / 37.34472; 127.03389
Climbing
Easiest route Gwanggyo Reservoir, Suwon
Korean name
Hangul 광교산
Hanja
Revised Romanization Gwanggyosan
McCune–Reischauer Kwanggyosan

Gwanggyosan (582 m[1]) is a small mountain in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. It lies on the border of Suwon and Yongin, though the wider range extends north and so also borders Uiwang, Gwacheon, Seoul and Seongnam.

The summit offers views across Suwon, Yongin and Bundang. The mountain is commonly hiked from Gwanggyo Reservoir in Suwon.[2]

Gwanggyosan and Pungsu[edit]

Interpreted within the context of traditional Korean logic and beliefs - especially within the realm of Korean Confucianism - Gwanggyosan serves as Suwon's jinsan, or Guardian Mountain. This is in keeping with the logic of pungsu (known as feng shui in China), which avers that an ideal site for a city or town is one where there is a jinsan to the north, an open vista, river or a large body of water to the south, and either mountains or valleys to the east and west.[3] As Suwon's jinsan, Gwanggyosan provides a natural landmark indicating the city's position to travelers [4] and acts as a sort of "shield" against the harsh winds from the north in wintertime. Aiding Gwanggyosan in providing a favorable sense of pungsu to Suwon are the flat farms and paddies in the southern portions of Gwonseon-gu and Yeongtong-gu, Chilbo-san to the west, and the hills along Suwon's border with Yongin to the east.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "한국의 산하 - 광교산 (Hangugui Sanha - Gwanggyosan)". Korean mountaineering association website. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 
  2. ^ "Welcome to Suwon - Gwanggyosan". Suwon City Council. Retrieved 2008-02-18. 
  3. ^ Korean Anthropology: Contemporary Korean Culture in Flux. Eds. Korean National Commission for UNESCO. 2003, pg. 89.
  4. ^ Korean Anthropology: Contemporary Korean Culture in Flux. Eds. Korean National Commission for UNESCO. 2003, pg. 90.

See also[edit]