Héctor Beltrán Leyva

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Héctor Beltrán Leyva
Born (1965-02-15) February 15, 1965 (age 49)
Badiraguato, Sinaloa, Mexico
Other names "El Ingeniero",[1] "El H"[1] "El General"[2]
Occupation Leader of the Beltrán Leyva Cartel
Criminal status
Fugitive
Reward amount
Mexico: $30 Million Mexican Pesos;
USA: $5 million USD
Wanted by
The Mexican PGR and the US DEA
Wanted since 2004
Comments Wanted by the Governments of Mexico and the United States
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Beltrán and the second or maternal family name is Leyva.

Héctor Beltrán Leyva (aka, Mario Alberto Beltrán Leyva)[2] is a Mexican drug lord and leader of the Beltrán Leyva Cartel.[1][3] He is the brother of Arturo Beltrán Leyva (deceased), former leader of the cartel. Héctor was the second-in-command and rose to the leadership of the criminal organization after his brother's death on December 16, 2009 during a confrontation with Mexican marines.[4][5]

Biography[edit]

Although originally a part of the Sinaloa Cartel, the four Beltrán Leyva brothers broke ties with the organization in 2008 after Alfredo Beltrán Leyva was arrested by Mexican military special forces, and the Beltrán Leyva brothers blamed their boss Joaquín Guzmán (a.k.a. El Chapo) of treason.[6][7] In response to the supposed betrayal, the Beltrán Leyva brothers ordered the murder of 22 year-old Édgar Guzmán López, a son of Joaquín Guzmán, who was killed in a shopping center parking lot by at least 15 gunmen using assault rifles and grenade launchers.[8][9]

The remaining four Beltrán Leyva brothers established the Beltrán Leyva Cartel and forged a collaboration pact with their former rivals: the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas. Today, the Beltrán Leyva Cartel is responsible for the procurement of fire arms and ammunitions from the United States in furtherance of their criminal enterprise and is responsible for the trafficking of multi-ton amounts of illicit drugs, including cocaine, marijuana, heroin, and methamphetamine. Héctor Beltrán Leyva is also credited with rising rates of violence within Mexico, as his organization is reportedly responsible for kidnapping, torture, murder, and various other acts of violence against numerous men, women, and children in Mexico.[1] The cartel is considered one of the most ruthless and brutal in the way they dispose of their enemies. The organization is connected with the assassinations of numerous Mexican law enforcement officials,[8][10] including Édgar Eusebio Millán Gómez, the former acting commissioner of the Mexican Federal Preventive Police.[11]

Bounty[edit]

The U.S. Department of State is currently offering a reward of USD $5 million for information leading to the arrest and/or conviction of Héctor Beltrán Leyva, while the Mexican government is offering a USD $2.1 million reward.[12][13]

Kingpin Act sanction[edit]

On 3 December 2009, the United States Department of the Treasury sanctioned Beltrán Leyva under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (sometimes referred to simply as the "Kingpin Act"), for his involvement in drug trafficking along with twenty-one other international criminals and ten foreign entities.[14] The act prohibited U.S. citizens and companies from doing any kind of business activity with him, and virtually froze all his assets in the U.S.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Narcotics Rewards Program: Hector Beltran-Leyva". United States Department of State. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  2. ^ a b México ofrece millonarias recompensas por 37 líderes del narco. Noticias Univision. March 23, 2009. Retrieved 11 June 2013.
  3. ^ De la Luz González, María (4 January 2010). "Héctor Beltrán asume el mando del cártel: PF". El Universal (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "Mexican navy kills top cartel kingpin in shootout". USA Today. Associated Press. 17 December 2009. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  5. ^ Malkin, Elisabeth (17 December 2009). "Mexico Deals a Blow to a Cartel but Warns of Continued Drug-Related Violence". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  6. ^ Wilkinson, Tracy (27 May 2012). "Sinaloa cartel, Zetas push Mexico's drug violence to new depths". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Fox, Edward (6 June 2012). "7 Dead in Sinaloa Alongside Banner Claiming State Collusion With Chapo Guzman". InSight Crime. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Mexico plagued by new wave of gangland murders". Monsters and Critics. 11 May 2008. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  9. ^ Valdez Cárdenas, Javier (10 May 2008). "Sinaloa, en jaque por la violencia tras ser asesinado hijo del Chapo". La Jornada (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Planearon los Beltrán Leyva homicidio de Edgar Millán: PFP". El Informador (in Spanish). 2008. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  11. ^ McKinley, James C. (9 May 2008). "Gunmen Kill Chief of Mexico's Police". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "Mexico's 24 most wanted traffickers". Los Angeles Times. The Associated Press. 23 March 2009. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  13. ^ Olson, Alexandra (24 March 2009). "Mexico offers $2 million for top drug lords". U-T San Diego. Archived from the original on 14 November 2012. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "DESIGNATIONS PURSUANT TO THE FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN DESIGNATION ACT". United States Department of the Treasury. 15 May 2014. p. 9. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  15. ^ "An overview of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act". United States Department of the Treasury. 2009. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014.