Hütter Hü 17

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Hü 17
TMW - Hütter H 17 b 1.jpg
Hü 17B in the Technisches Museum Wien
Role Glider
National origin Germany
Designer Ulrich Hütter and Wolfgang Hütter
Status Production completed
Number built "several hundred"[1]

The Hütter Hü 17, is a German high-wing, strut-braced, single-seat, utility training glider that was designed by brothers Ulrich Hütter and Wolfgang Hütter in the 1930s.[1][2]

The aircraft's correct designation is unclear and various sources refer to is as the Hütter Hü 17, Hütter-17, Hütter H-17, Hutter H-17, Hütter Hü-17, Göppingen Gö 5 and Goppingen 5.[1][2][3][4]

Design and development[edit]

The Hütter brothers designed the Hü 17 in Salzburg, Austria, the designation indicating the aircraft's glide ratio. The design was made available as plans for amateur construction and several hundred were completed. The brothers then joined the Schempp-Hirth company which constructed about five of the aircraft under the designation Göppingen Gö 5.[1][2]

The aircraft is of wooden construction, using a D-tube wing with a single strut and doped aircraft fabric covering. The wing employs a Göppingen 535 airfoil at the wing root and a NACA M-6 at the wing tip. The fuselage is plywood covered.[1][2][5]

Operational history[edit]

In the 1980s a number of aircraft were still flying in Australia, West Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States.[1] In July 2011 one example was registered with the American Federal Aviation Administration in the Experimental - Exhibition category, having been constructed in 1990.[6]

Variants[edit]

Hü 17B in the Technisches Museum Wien
Hü 17
Initial model with a 9.7 m (31.8 ft) wing span[1][2]
Hü 17B
Improved model, introduced after the Second World War with increased wing span and higher empty and gross weights[1][2]
Göppingen Gö 5
Model built by Schempp-Hirth[1][2]

Aircraft on display[edit]

Specifications (Hü 17b)[edit]

Data from Sailplane Directory and Soaring[1][2]The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde[7]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 5.18 m (17 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.96 m (32 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 9.47 m2 (101.9 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 10.5:1
  • Airfoil: root: Göttingen 535, tip NACA M-6
  • Empty weight: 110 kg (243 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 210 kg (463 lb)

Performance

  • Never exceed speed: 160 km/h (99 mph; 86 kn)
  • Aerotow speed: 100 km/h (62.1 mph; 54.0 kn)
  • Winch launch speed: 80 km/h (49.7 mph; 43.2 kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: 17:1 at 64 km/h (40 mph)
  • Rate of sink: 0.98 m/s (192 ft/min) at 61 km/h (38 mph)
  • Wing loading: 22.2 kg/m2 (4.5 lb/sq ft)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Said, Bob: 1983 Sailplane Directory, Soaring Magazine, page 86, Soaring Society of America November 1983. USPS 499-920
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Activate Media (2006). "Goppingen 5 Hutter 17". Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
  3. ^ a b National Soaring Museum (2011). "Sailplanes in Our Collection". Retrieved 1 July 2011. 
  4. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (July 2011). "Make / Model Inquiry Results". Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
  5. ^ Lednicer, David (2010). "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". Retrieved 1 July 2011. 
  6. ^ Federal Aviation Administration (July 2011). "Make / Model Inquiry Results N17HU". Retrieved 14 July 2011. 
  7. ^ Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson & Peter Brooks (1958). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs dans Le Monde (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 9–13. 
  • Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson & Peter Brooks (1958). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs dans Le Monde (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 9–13.