H. Steven Blum

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H Steven Blum
Blum web.jpg
Blum in January 2009, during his tenure as Deputy Commander of U.S. Northern Command.
Born (1946-10-13) October 13, 1946 (age 68)
Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Allegiance  United States of America
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 1971-2010
Rank Army-USA-OF-08.svg Lieutenant General
Unit Maryland Army National Guard
Commands held 29th Infantry Division (Light)
Multinational Division, SFOR
Chief, National Guard Bureau
Battles/wars Operation Joint Forge
Awards Defense Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Army Distinguished Service Medal
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit (3)
Meritorious Service Medal (3)
Army Commendation Medal (2)
Other work Managing Director and Group Practice Leader, Sitrick Brincko Group
Advisor, Blakely Educational Services, Inc.

H Steven Blum (born October 13, 1946) is a retired United States Army Lieutenant General. Blum served as the 25th Chief of the National Guard Bureau from 2003 to 2008. His last assignment before retiring was Deputy Commander, U.S. Northern Command, where he concurrently served as Vice Commander, U.S. Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command. He retired from the Army National Guard of the United States on May 21, 2010.

Early life and education[edit]

Blum was born in Baltimore, Maryland on October 13, 1946.[1] He attended Forest Park High School, graduating in 1963.[2] He obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in history from the University of Baltimore in 1968.[3]

Soon after graduating, Blum enlisted in the Maryland Army National Guard. His unit was activated in response to riots that flared up in the wake of the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Blum would later recall that "he heard more shots fired in the weeks he worked downtown Baltimore's streets than during any of his other deployments - at home or abroad."[4]

Blum taught U.S. history at Pimlico Junior High School before accepting a full-time position with the Army National Guard in 1971. He received a Master of Science degree in social science from Morgan State College in 1973.

Blum is Jewish, and is a member of Jewish War Veterans.[5]

Career[edit]

Blum received his commission from Officer Candidate School on August 28, 1971, graduating with honors. He subsequently carried out staff and command assignmemnts at every level from platoon to division, including command of a Special Forces Operational Detachment-A, Light Infantry Battalion, Infantry Brigade, and Division Support Command.[6]

His general officer assignments included Assistant Adjutant General for the Maryland Army National Guard, Assistant Division Commander (Support) and Commander of the 29th Infantry Division (Light), and Chief of Staff, United States Northern Command.[7]

Operation Joint Forge[edit]

Blum served as Commanding General for Multinational Division (North) Stabilization Force 10 in Bosnia and Herzegovina during 2001 and 2002 as part of Operation Joint Forge.[8]

During his tenure at SFOR, Blum received high marks for his military and diplomatic ability to command and coordinate multiple units of various nations. In his last work, To America: Personal Reflections of an Historian, the late historian Steven Ambrose compared Blum favorably to Dwight Eisenhower in World War II.[9]

Chief of the National Guard Bureau[edit]

In April, 2003 Blum was appointed Chief of the National Guard Bureau and promoted to Lieutenant General.[10]

When his term expired in 2007 he received a two-year extension.[11]

As Chief, National Guard Bureau, Blum was the senior uniformed National Guard officer, responsible for formulating, developing, and coordinating all policies, programs, and plans affecting more than half a million federalized and nonfederalized Army National Guard and Air National Guard personnel. Appointed by the President, he served as the principal adviser to the Secretary of Defense and Chief of Staff of the Army, and Chief of Staff of the Air Force on all National Guard issues. His duties also included serving as the Army's and Air Force's official channel of communication with state governors and Adjutants General concerning the 54 state and territorial National Guards.

He served as Chief until November, 2009 and was succeeded by Craig R. McKinley.[12]

United States Northern Command[edit]

Following his term as Chief of the National Guard Bureau, Blum was assigned as Deputy Commander of the United States Northern Command.[13]

As Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command, Blum helped lead the command to anticipate, prepare, and respond to threats and aggression aimed at the United States, its territories, and interests within the assigned area of responsibility and, as directed by the President or Secretary of Defense, provided defense support to civil authorities including consequence management operations.

He served at NORTHCOM until retiring in May, 2010.[14]

Later work[edit]

After his retirement from the military, Blum accepted a position as managing director and group practice leader with the Sitrick Brincko Group.[15]

He was also an Executive in Residence at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Education, Division of Public Safety and Leadership.[16]

As of 2012, Blum is affiliated with Blakely Educational Services, Inc., a firm which provides educational services to the United States military, its allies, and for other organizations.[17]

NAACP Meritorious Service Award[edit]

On July 18, 2006, Blum was awarded the NAACP Meritorious Service Award at their 31st annual Armed Services and Veterans Affairs Awards banquet.[18] Some atheists and agnostics objected to certain remarks about their lack of religious belief, and his paraphrased repetition of the "no atheists in foxholes" assertion. According to Blum in his remarks: "The strength of this nation is that it's not homogeneous. We don't all look alike. We don't all think alike. We don't all play alike. We don't all have the same physical attributes."

Civilian education[edit]

Military education[edit]

In addition, Blum is a graduate of:

Assignments[edit]

  1. August 1971 - September 1972, S-3, Detachment B3, Company B, 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Maryland Army National Guard
  2. October 1972 - August 1974, Air Operations Officer, Headquarters Detachment, 5th Special Forces Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group, Maryland Army National Guard
  3. August 1974 - August 1976, Battalion S-2, Headquarters Detachment, 5th Special Forces Battalion, 20th Special Forces, Maryland Army National Guard
  4. September 1976 - November 1977, Recruiting and Retention Officer, Headquarters Detachment, Maryland Army National Guard
  5. November 1977 - August 1978, Commander, Special Forces Operations Detachment-A, Company B, 5th Special Forces Battalion, 20th Special Forces, Maryland Army National Guard
  6. September 1978 - October 1978, Recruiting and Retention Officer, Headquarters Detachment, Maryland Army National Guard
  7. October 1978 - June 1981, Special Forces Operations Officer, Command and Control, Headquarters, Maryland Army National Guard
  8. July 1981 - September 1981, Marksmanship Program Administrator, Headquarters Detachment, Maryland Army National Guard
  9. October 1981 - September 1982, Training Administrator, Headquarters Detachment, Maryland Army National Guard
  10. October 1982 - November 1984, Director Plans, Operations and Training, Headquarters, State Area Command, Maryland Army National Guard
  11. December 1984 - July 1985, Mobilization Operations Officer, Headquarters, State Area Command, Maryland Army National Guard
  12. August 1985 - September 1987, Battalion Commander, Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 115th Infantry, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard
  13. October 1987 - October 1988, Executive Officer, Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard
  14. November 1988 - January 1989, Operations and Training Officer, Headquarters, State Area Command, Maryland Army National Guard
  15. January 1989 - August 1992, Director, Plans, Operations, and Training, Headquarters, Maryland Army National Guard
  16. September 1992 - July 1995, Commander, 3rd Brigade, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard
  17. July 1995 - August 1996, Commander, Division Support Command, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard
  18. August 1996 - July 1999, Assistant Division Commander, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard
  19. August 1999 - October 2001, Commanding General, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Virginia Army National Guard
  20. October 2001 - April 2002, Commanding General, Multi National Division (North), Stabilization Force 10, Operation Joint Force, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  21. April 2002 - August 2002, Commanding General, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Virginia Army National Guard
  22. August 2002 - April 2003, Chief of Staff, United States Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado
  23. April 2003 - November 2008, Chief, National Guard Bureau, Arlington, Virginia
  24. January 2009 – May 21, 2010, Deputy Commander, United States Northern Command and Vice Commander, United States Element, North American Aerospace Defense Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado

Awards and decorations[edit]

Bronze oak leaf cluster
Defense Distinguished Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg Army Distinguished Service Medal
US Defense Superior Service Medal ribbon.svg Defense Superior Service Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Legion of Merit (with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Meritorious Service Medal (with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Commendation Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Achievement Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
Joint Meritorious Unit Award ribbon.svg Joint Meritorious Unit Award
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Superior Unit Award (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal (with 1 Silver and 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
Bronze star
National Defense Service Medal (with Bronze Service Star)
AFEMRib.svg Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary ribbon.svg Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
Global War on Terrorism Service ribbon.svg Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
Armed Forces Service Medal ribbon.svg Armed Forces Service Medal
Humanitarian Service ribbon.svg Humanitarian Service Medal
AFRM with Hourglass Device (Gold).jpg Armed Forces Reserve Medal (with "M" Device and Gold Hourglass)
Army Service Ribbon.svg Army Service Ribbon
Army Reserve Overseas Training Ribbon.svg Army Reserve Component Overseas Training Ribbon
NATO Medal Yugoslavia ribbon bar.svg NATO Medal
SpecialForcesTabMetal.jpg Special Forces Tab
Office of the Secretary of Defense Identification Badge.png Secretary of Defense Identification Badge
Expert Infantry Badge.svg Expert Infantryman Badge
US Army Airborne master parachutist badge.gif Master Parachutist Badge
AirAssault.svg Air Assault Badge
United States Army Staff Identification Badge.png Army Staff Identification Badge
Canadian jump wings.png Canadian Parachutist Badge

Dates of rank[edit]

Rank Date
US-O9 insignia.svg Lieutenant General 13 April 2003
US-O8 insignia.svg Major General 1 February 2000
US-O7 insignia.svg Brigadier General 1 August 1996
US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel 3 January 1989
US-O5 insignia.svg Lieutenant Colonel 1 October 1982
US-O4 insignia.svg Major 8 September 1978
US-O3 insignia.svg Captain 3 September 1974
US-O2 insignia.svg First Lieutenant 28 August 1972
US-O1 insignia.svg Second Lieutenant 28 August 1971

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Public Records Index, Volume 1, entry for H. Steven Blum, 1020
  2. ^ Tom Bowman, Baltimore Sun, Bush nominates Marylander to Top National Guard Post, January 7, 2003
  3. ^ Blakely Educational Services, Resume, H Steven Blum, 2012, page 2
  4. ^ Caitlin Harrington, "Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum commands a changing National Guard," Congressional Quarterly (October 10, 2003).
  5. ^ Jewish War Veterans, Articles from the Jewish War Veterans, Lieutenant General H Steven, Excerpts of Remarks, 2003, page 1
  6. ^ Maryland Military Historical Society, Newsletter, LTG (Ret.) H Steven Blum Elected President of MDMHS, 2010, page 1
  7. ^ Space Foundation, Strategic Space Symposium, Speaker's biography, H Steven Blum, 2009
  8. ^ United States Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, Biography, H. Steven Blum, 2013
  9. ^ MSG Bob Haskell, "Blum new Guard Bureau chief," Army News Service, (April 16, 2003).
  10. ^ Katherine McIntire Peters, Government Executive, National Guard to Undergo Major Overhaul, May 18, 2003
  11. ^ National Guard Bureau, Lieutenant General H. Steven Blum Extended as Chief, National Guard Bureau, January 26, 2007
  12. ^ Mike R. Smith, National Guard Bureau, Gates Taps McKinley as Next Guard Bureau Chief, July 16, 2008
  13. ^ North American Aerospace Defense Command, Blum assumes Deputy Commander, USNORTHCOM, January 16, 2009
  14. ^ PRNews Wire, Lt General H Steven Blum (U.S. Army, Ret.) Joins Sitrick Brincko Group, July 13, 2010
  15. ^ "Retired General Joins Sitrick Brincko", The New York Times, 2010-07-12, retrieved 2011-09-09 
  16. ^ U.S. House Armed Services Committee, Biography H Steven Blum, page 1, 2010
  17. ^ Blakely Educational Services, Inc., Home page, The BES Team, accessed June 7, 2013
  18. ^ Rudi Williams, "General Praises NAACP for Making National Guard Better," Armed Forces Press Service (July 19, 2006).
  19. ^ North Atlantic *Treaty Organization, Stabilization Force, Biography, H Steven Blum, accessed June 7, 2013

External links[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
MG Raymond F. Rees (acting)
Chief of the National Guard Bureau
2003 - 2008
Succeeded by
GEN Craig R. McKinley