H. W. Derby Building

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H. W. Derby Building
H.W. Derby Building.jpg
Front and side of the building
Location Cincinnati, Ohio
Coordinates 39°05′58″N 84°31′04″W / 39.09935°N 84.51773°W / 39.09935; -84.51773Coordinates: 39°05′58″N 84°31′04″W / 39.09935°N 84.51773°W / 39.09935; -84.51773
Architect Samuel Hannaford [1]
Architectural style Italianate[1]
NRHP Reference # 80003045[1]
Added to NRHP March 3, 1980[1]

H. W. Derby Building is a registered historic building in Cincinnati, Ohio. The building was designed by architect Samuel Hannaford. It listed in the National Register on March 3, 1980.

The firm of H. W. Derby & Co. acted as a jobbing outlet "for such large eastern houses as Harpers and Appleton", operated the largest and most elaborate bookstore in the West, and was well known in the Ohio Valley. H. W. Derby had an extensive publishing business of law books, medical books, and "miscellaneous" publications, "his law book line being unrivaled in the West" and his works of history, biography and travels, "received a new impetus with the passage of the act establishing the Ohio School Library in 1853." This law, "which Derby had zealously promoted, provided a tax for the support of libraries in school districts throughout the state, and the books for these collections were largely supplied by Derby from the publications of Harpers (who in 1839 had secured a monopoly to supply the New York School District libraries), Appleton, Derby & Jackson, and his own house."[2]

Hamilton & Rankin (John R. Hamilton's firm) designed the H. W. Derby Building on Third Street.[3] H. W. Derby opened a New York gallery, the Institute of Fine Arts, at 625 Broadway, but "it is likely that this enterprise was a casualty of war" because a few years later he was exhibiting foreign paintings around the country "one of which, Dubufe's "Prodigal Son," burned in Smith & Nixon's hall in Cincinnati. In the late 1870s he returned to Columbus, Ohio and after a few years again moved on to Cincinnati, where he erected an impressive business block, the Derby Building, which later burned.."[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-06-30. 
  2. ^ a b Walter Sutton Volume III · Winter 1948 · Number 2 The Derby Brothers: 19th Century Bookmen UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER LIBRARY BULLETIN
  3. ^ Hamilton & Rankin Biographical Dictionary of Cincinnati Architects, 1788-1940